Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the following code (without virtual inheritance) :

class A
{
public:
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

class B : public A
{
 public:
    virtual void f() {}
};

class C : public A
{
 public:
    virtual void f() {}
};

class D : public B, public C
{

/* some code */
};


int main()
{
    D d;
    return 0;
}

the code compile.

On the other hand , here :

class A
{
public:
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

class B : virtual public A
{
    virtual void f() {}
};

class C : virtual public A
{
    virtual void f() {}
};

class D : public B, public C
{
    /* some code */
};


int main()
{
    D d;
    return 0;
}

The compiler presents a compilation error:

no unique final overrider for 'virtual void A::f()' in 'D' . 

Why is it different in the second code ?

share|improve this question
    
Does D implement/override virtual void f() or no? –  ssube Aug 28 '11 at 9:07
    
Virtual inheritance is not the magical solution to the repeated inheritance issue. It is a different tool than non-virtual inheritance, much like virtual vs. non-virtual functions: they have different semantics, and are appropriate for different problems. –  curiousguy Jul 21 '12 at 1:57

2 Answers 2

Your first scenario hierarchy corresponds to:

    F()   F()
     A     A
     |     |
 F() B     C F()
      \   /
        D 

Where D is not abstract, because there are two A subobjects in an object of type D: One that is made concrete by B through the lattice of B, and another that is made concrete through the lattice of C.

Unless you try to invoke the function F() on object of D there will not be any ambiguity.

Your second scenario hierarchy corresponds to:

       F()  
        A
      /   \
 F() B     C F()
      \   /
        D  

In this scenario, the object D has a single Base class A sub object, and it must override and provide implementation of the pure virtual function in that subobject.


Herb Sutter's articles in Guru Of The Week(GOTW) are a nice read for Multiple Inheritance:

  1. Multiple Inheritance Part I
  2. Multiple Inheritance Part II
  3. Multiple Inheritance Part III
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for ASCII art, and +1 for linking to GOTW :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 28 '11 at 11:25
1  
Even when the A::f() is not pure virtual , the compilation error happens. See link –  fizzbuzz Jun 19 '13 at 19:59

With the virtual inheritance a D object has a single base-class A sub-object. This single sub-object can’t have two different implementations of a virtual function. In contrast, without virtual inheritance a D object has two distinct base-class A sub-objects, each with its own implementation of the function (which is OK until you try to call it on a D object, at which point you need to indicate which one you want).

Cheers & hth.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.