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The following awk one-liner allows me to split a file according to the character at position 22:

awk -v pdb="${file}" -F "" '{close(c);c=$22}{print > pdb"_"c".pdb"}' ${file}.1tmp 

My files are of the type:

ATOM   8911  N   SER W   1      -5.412  94.401  12.569  1.00137.46           N  
ATOM   8912  CA  SER W   1      -4.093  93.709  12.370  1.00137.35           C  
ATOM   8913  C   SER W   1      -3.115  93.771  13.604  1.00137.27           C  
ATOM   8914  O   SER W   1      -2.023  93.177  13.570  1.00137.22           O  
ATOM   8915  CB  SER W   1      -3.417  94.212  11.063  1.00137.29           C  
ATOM      1  N   ASP X   7      70.244 176.432 -72.598  1.00121.87           N  
ATOM      2  CA  ASP X   7      70.164 177.938 -72.649  1.00122.11           C  
ATOM      3  C   ASP X   7      68.705 178.495 -72.843  1.00121.38           C  
ATOM      4  O   ASP X   7      68.482 179.724 -72.941  1.00121.16           O  
ATOM      5  CB  ASP X   7      71.128 178.442 -73.745  1.00122.87           C  
ATOM   5143  N   ASP W   7     -68.623 209.141 -11.831  1.00118.10           N  
ATOM   5144  CA  ASP W   7     -67.698 209.756 -12.845  1.00118.36           C  
ATOM   5145  C   ASP W   7     -66.378 210.288 -12.223  1.00118.02           C  
ATOM   5146  O   ASP W   7     -65.657 211.116 -12.802  1.00118.06           O  
ATOM   5147  CB  ASP W   7     -68.436 210.840 -13.657  1.00118.67           C  

However, the script copies all lines with a W at the 22nd position in the same file even if they are in non-contiguous blocks. I would like to split the file in blocks so that the first contiguous block containing W (or whatever other character) will be named W1 and the second W2 and so on. Can this be easily done with awk or should I go for a loop with a counter or something like that?

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Sad Python is sad ;) –  Tom Zych Aug 28 '11 at 9:54
    
I started to learn Python one week ago. However, I am not a programmer and I need to finish what I am doing right now in the next few days. I doubt I can learn enough Python in that period of time. Namely considering that I am not familiar with any programming language. –  mirix Aug 28 '11 at 9:56
    
Just a joke, referring to the earlier question where the Python script worked and the awk one didn't, and that you seem to want only an awk solution this time. I'd post you a Python script if my brain were less fried. –  Tom Zych Aug 28 '11 at 10:00
    
Ok, thanks ;-) The frustrating thing is that I am 95 % done. I am just dealing with a couple weird exceptions when parsing files (the thing I like the least about programming this far). –  mirix Aug 28 '11 at 10:03
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
awk -v pdb="${file}" 'BEGIN{f=1} NR==1{n=$5;s[$5]=f} $5!=n{s[$5]=f++ ;n=$5} { print > pdb"_"$5"_"s[$5]".txt" }' ${file}
share|improve this answer
    
awk pdb="${file}" -F "" 'BEGIN{f=1} NR==1{n=$22;s[$22]=f} $22!=n{s[$22]=f++ ;n=$22} { print > pdb""$22""s[$22]".txt" }' ${file}.1tmp –  mirix Aug 28 '11 at 11:18
    
I forgot the -v –  mirix Aug 28 '11 at 11:27
    
with what you are doing, you don't even need to use "" delimiter. Using field positions should be easier –  ghostdog74 Aug 28 '11 at 11:38
    
Yes, I do. Otherwise I would not use it. Sometimes, with large values in the second column, there is no space left between the first and second columns, so from the awn point of view, that is just one column and therefore the 5th column becomes the 4th. In the PDB format, each field occupies a fixed position and therefore it is better to provide the specific position rather than using delimiters. Is it possible to specify a range in awk? I mean something like $22-$25? –  mirix Aug 28 '11 at 13:14
    
not with awk. but you can use for loop, depending on what you want to do with that range. –  ghostdog74 Aug 28 '11 at 14:05
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