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I am trying to find the minimun number in an array using recursive function.but my code gives segemtation fault .

main()
{
    int a[5]={2,1,4,5,3};
    int n=1;
    fumi(a,n,a[0],5);
}

fumi(int a[],int n,int min,int t)
{
    if(n==t)
    {
        printf("%d",min);
    }
    if(a[n]<min)
    {
        min=a[n];
    }
    return(fumi(a,n+1,min,t));
}

Where am doing wrong and also main is not returning anything is not reason for segmentation fault.

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Note : as an exercise for recursion, this may be interesting, but in a real program, this is an extremely bad idea. –  Clement Bellot Aug 28 '11 at 12:01
    
how it would be a bad idea?? –  Amit Singh Tomar Aug 28 '11 at 12:05
    
When you want to sort a[10000] (not sure of the number), you are going to have your program crashing (by en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stack_overflow ), unless the compiler remove the recursion as an optimization. While the non recursive function takes 5 lines, takes way less memory, is easier to understand, and (also) is faster. –  Clement Bellot Aug 28 '11 at 12:11
1  
@Amit Singh Tomar C compilers are not required to apply the tail call optimization. If a compiler does not apply it, your program will run out of stack (and terminate abruptly) for moderately sized arrays. –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 28 '11 at 12:13
    
Agreed, this is a terrible candidate for a recursive solution. –  David Heffernan Aug 28 '11 at 14:12
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you should also return after printf("%d",min); otherwise, you check if (a[t] < min), and a[t] was not allocated.

fumi(int a[],int n,int min,int t)
{
    if(n==t)
    {
        printf("%d",min);
        return; //This line was added
    }
    if(a[n]<min)
    {
        min=a[n];
    }
    return(fumi(a,n+1,min,t));
}
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Thanks @amit it works but how my code was wrong?? –  Amit Singh Tomar Aug 28 '11 at 12:00
    
@Amit Singh Tomar: you didn't stop the recursion, and when trying to access a[5], which was not allocated by you, you got a seg-fault. the return, after printing stopped the recursion and prevented accessing not allocated memory. –  amit Aug 28 '11 at 12:01
    
yes got ur point @Amit !! –  Amit Singh Tomar Aug 28 '11 at 12:04
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Your code is very close to working. The reason it crashes is because the recursion never stops and goes on part the end of the array.

You correctly check for n == t and print out the result, but after that you don't return. The code keeps running on to infinity. Simply adding a return after the printf solves the problem:

void fumi(int a[],int n,int min,int t)
{
    if(n==t)
    {
        printf("%d",min);
        return; // stop recursing
    }
    if(a[n]<min)
    {
        min=a[n];
    }
    fumi(a,n+1,min,t);
}
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After executing

if(n==t)
{
    printf("%d",min);
}

It does not return, instead it goes on doing:

if(a[n]<min)
{
    min=a[n];
}

So when the base condition satisfies it does not return. Therefore the fumi function is always called recursively.

Two causes of segfault:

  1. As n goes beyond the max array length, an unallocated (illegal) memory access triggers it
  2. As the recursion does not return, we get a stack overflow, leads to a segmentation fault.

whichever occurs first.

Therefore the correction your code needs is to return when it encounters the base condition:

if(n==t)
{
    printf("%d",min);
    return;
}
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1  
Thanks @phoxis for your nice explanation –  Amit Singh Tomar Aug 28 '11 at 12:19
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