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How can I label each of these lines separately :

Plot[{{5 + 2 x}, {6 + x}}, {x, 0, 10}]

enter image description here

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3 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted

There's some nice code that allows you to do this dynamically in an answer to How to annotate multiple datasets in ListPlots.

There's also a LabelPlot command defined in the Technical Note Labeling Curves in Plots

Of course, if you don't have too many images to make, then it's not hard to manually add the labels in using Epilog, for example

fns[x_] := {5 + 2 x, 6 + x}; 
len := Length[fns[x]];

Plot[Evaluate[fns[x]], {x, 0, 10}, 
 Epilog -> Table[Inset[
    Framed[DisplayForm[fns[x][[i]]], RoundingRadius -> 5], 
    {5, fns[5][[i]]}, Background -> White], {i, len}]]

outputa

In fact, you can do something similar with Locators that allows you to move the labels wherever you want:

DynamicModule[{pos = Table[{1, fns[1][[i]]}, {i, len}]},
 LocatorPane[Dynamic[pos], Plot[Evaluate[fns[x]], {x, 0, 10}],
  Appearance -> Table[Framed[Text@TraditionalForm[fns[x][[i]]], 
                  RoundingRadius -> 5, Background -> White], {i, len}]]]

In the above I made the locators take the form of the labels, although it is also possible to keep an Epilog like that above and have invisible locators that control the positions. The locators could also be constrained (using the 2nd argument of Dynamic) to the appropriate curves... but that's not really necessary.

As an example of the above code with the functions with the labels moved by hand:

fns[x_] := {Log[x], Exp[x], Sin[x], Cos[x]};

four functions

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+1 Nice idea to use Locators! –  Alexey Popkov Aug 28 '11 at 14:40
8  
+1. It might not be necessary to constrain the locators to the lines, but it is pretty cool to do so. Try changing the Dynamic expression to Dynamic[pos,(pos=MapIndexed[{##}/.{{x_, y_}, {i_}}:>{x,fns[x][[i]]}&,#])&]. –  WReach Aug 28 '11 at 15:13
2  
@WReach: You're just the type of interested reader that I left this exercise to! Your code works nicely. –  Simon Aug 28 '11 at 15:18
    
@Simon, Thank You very much, it looks great. –  500 Aug 28 '11 at 20:49
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You can insert legends in your plot by loading the PlotLegends package

<<PlotLegends`;
Plot[{5+2 x,6+x},{x,0,10},
    PlotLegend->{"5+2x","6+x"},LegendShadow->None,
    LegendPosition->{0.3,-0.5},LegendSpacing->-0,LegendSize->0.5]

enter image description here


However, let me also note my dislike of this package, primarily because it's extremely counterintuitive, laden with too many options and does not provide a clean experience right out of the box like most of Mathematica's functions. You will have some fiddling around to do with the options to get what you want. However, in plots and charts where you do want a legend, this can be handy. Also see the comments to this answer and this question.

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The PlotLegends package is not optimal. See the comments to this answer and this SO question. –  Simon Aug 28 '11 at 14:40
1  
@Simon: I know... I had a second part to my answer which I deleted before the 5 min window because I didn't want to pass any judgements. Here is what it said: " However, let me also note my dislike of this package, primarily because it's extremely counterintuitive, laden with too many options and does not provide a clean experience right out of the box like most of Mathematica's functions. You will have some fiddling around to do with the options to get what you want. However, in plots and charts where you do want a legend, this can be handy." –  Lorem Ipsum Aug 28 '11 at 14:43
    
I'll delete this answer after you've read my response. However, do add those two links above as a comment to the question (also noting that it's buggy). Perhaps all he wants is a legend and people have ways of complicating requests. –  Lorem Ipsum Aug 28 '11 at 14:46
    
Leave the answer here! It's good to have the standard answer and a discussion of its strengths and weaknesses. –  Simon Aug 28 '11 at 14:51
2  
Because PlotLegends is sub-par, I've used used the energy level diagram part of LevelScheme to create legends before. It's not automated, nor simple, but it worked and well. –  rcollyer Aug 28 '11 at 16:32
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Mathematica 9 now provides easy ways to include legends.

Plot[{{5 + 2 x}, {6 + x}}, {x, 0, 10}, PlotLegends -> "Expressions"]
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