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when comparing simple arrays, i use something like the following function to concatenate and remove duplicates:

//Merge
public function merge(a1:Array, a2:Array):Array
{
    var result:Array = a1.concat(a2);

    var dictionary:Dictionary = new Dictionary();

    for each    (var item:Object in result)
                dictionary[item] = true;

    result = new Array();

    for (var key:Object in dictionary)
        result.push(key);

    dictionary = null;

    return result;
}

however, this approach doesn't work on complex arrays.

is there a well known algorithm, or is it even possible to write a function of recursion that can compare a Vector.<Object> with another? one that will always work even if the some objects being compared have additional key/value pairs?


[EDIT]


to be more clear, using a dictionary to determine if items in a simple array only works on primitive data types (int, number, string, etc.) or object references, so the above example works if it's passed 2 arrays resembling something like this:

var arr1:Array = new Array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
var arr2:Array = new Array(8, 7, 6, 5, 4);

resulting in a merged array with the following values:

1, 2, 3, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4

in contrast, i'm asking if it's possible to pass a function 2 complex arrays or Vector.<Object> all containing unique objects that may have identical key/value pairs and remove redundencies in the resulting Vector.<Object>. for example:

var vec1:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>();
vec1.push({city:"Montreal", country:"Canada"});
vec1.push({city:"Halifax", country:"Canada"});

var vec2:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>();
vec2.push({city:"Halifax", country:"Canada"});
vec2.push({city:"Toronto", country:"Canada"});

merging the above 2 vector objects would result in the following vector by determining and removing objects with identical key/value pairs:

{city:"Montreal", country:"Canada"}
{city:"Halifax", country:"Canada"}
{city:"Toronto", country:"Canada"}

i'm searching for an algorithm which could handle the removal of these similar objects without having to know about their specific key/value names or how many key/value pairs there are within the object.

share|improve this question
    
Hi, you replaced result with dataProperty in the example. –  recursivity Aug 28 '11 at 23:29
    
ah, missed that. fixed. –  TheDarkIn1978 Aug 29 '11 at 1:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sure you can, you can build a similar example with any type of Vector:

     public function mergeObjectVectors(v1:Vector.<Object>,                      
                                        v2:Vector.<Object>):Vector.<Object>
     {
        var dictionary:Dictionary = new Dictionary();
        var concat:Vector.<Object> = v1.concat(v2);
        var result:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>();

        for each(var i:Object in concat)
        {
            if (!dictionary[i])
            {
                dictionary[i] = true;
                result.push(i);
            }
        }           

        return result;
    } 

However if you plan on accepting vectors of any type, it's different:

        public function testing():void
        {
             var v1:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>();
             v1.push({name:"Object 1"});
             v1.push({name:"Object 2"});

             // Vector w duplicates
             var v2:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>();
             var o:Object = {name:"Object 3"};                 
             v2.push(o);
             v2.push(o);
             v2.push(o);

             var resultVector:Vector.<Object> = mergeAnything(v1, v2, Class(Vector.<Object>));
             var resultArray:Array = mergeAnything(v1, v2, Array);
             var resultObject:Object = mergeAnything(v1, v2, Object);
        }


        public function mergeAnything(o1:Object, o2:Object, resultClass:Class):*
        {

            var dictionary:Dictionary = new Dictionary();
            var result:Object = new resultClass();

            var i:int;
            for each(var o:Object in o1)
            {
               if (!dictionary[o])
               {
                  dictionary[o] = true;
                  result[i++] = o;
               }
            }   

            for each(o in o2)
            {
               if (!dictionary[o])
               {
                  dictionary[o] = true;
                  result[i++] = o;
               }
            }

            return result;
        }

The first example will be more resource-efficient.


EDIT: This should do it, try it with your example:

     public function mergeObjectVectors(v1:Vector.<Object>, v2:Vector.<Object>):Vector.<Object>
    {
        var concat:Vector.<Object> = v1.concat(v2);
        var result:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>();

        var n:int = concat.length;
        loop:for (var i:int = 0; i < n; i++)
        {   
            var objectToAdd:Object = concat[i];

            var m:int = result.length;
            for (var j:int = 0; j < m; j++)
            {
                var addedObject:Object = result[j];
                if (this.areObjectsIdentical(objectToAdd, addedObject))
                {
                    continue loop;
                }
            }
            result.push(objectToAdd);
        }           

        return result;
    } 

    private function areObjectsIdentical(o1:Object, o2:Object):Boolean
    {
        var numComparisons:int = 0;

        for (var s:String in o1)
        {
            numComparisons++;
            if (o1[s] != o2[s])
            {
                return false;
            }
        }                   
        for (s in o2)
        {
            numComparisons--;
        }

        return !numComparisons;     
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Well it seems that you're allowed to cast an Array as a Vector, so all you have to do is return an Array and cast it as a vector. –  recursivity Aug 29 '11 at 0:33
    
much like my previous attempts, neither can i seem to get your first example to work. i'm passing the function 2 vectors, both of which contain this object with identical key/value pairs: {city:"Montreal", age:369}, but both are still being added to the resulting vector. –  TheDarkIn1978 Aug 29 '11 at 2:24
    
Even if they contain identical information they would be different objects (instanced twice) so the resulting vector would include both objects, but that should also happen with the arrays. –  recursivity Aug 29 '11 at 2:35
    
it works with simple arrays of numbers, ints and strings. yes, they are different objects which is why dictionary doesn't work since it only recognizes reference similarities. perhaps adding my example in my question was misleading, but i'm asking if it's possible to compare different objects with identical key/value pairs, perhaps thru recursion, in order to remove redundancies. –  TheDarkIn1978 Aug 29 '11 at 2:55
    
i've edited my question. hopefully it's now more clear. –  TheDarkIn1978 Aug 29 '11 at 3:12

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