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Given an existing point in lat/long, distance in (in KM) and bearing (in degrees converted to radians), I would like to calculate the new lat/long. This site crops up over and over again, but I just can't get the formula to work for me.

The formulas as taken the above link are:

lat2 = asin(sin(lat1)*cos(d/R) + cos(lat1)*sin(d/R)*cos(θ))

lon2 = lon1 + atan2(sin(θ)*sin(d/R)*cos(lat1), cos(d/R)−sin(lat1)*sin(lat2))

The above formula is for MSExcel where-

asin          = arc sin()   
d             = distance (in any unit)   
R             = Radius of the earth (in the same unit as above)  
and hence d/r = is the angular distance (in radians)  
atan2(a,b)    = arc tan(b/a)  
θ is the bearing (in radians, clockwise from north);  

Here's the code I've got in Python.

import math

R = 6378.1 #Radius of the Earth
brng = 1.57 #Bearing is 90 degrees converted to radians.
d = 15 #Distance in km

#lat2  52.20444 - the lat result I'm hoping for
#lon2  0.36056 - the long result I'm hoping for.

lat1 = 52.20472 * (math.pi * 180) #Current lat point converted to radians
lon1 = 0.14056 * (math.pi * 180) #Current long point converted to radians

lat2 = math.asin( math.sin(lat1)*math.cos(d/R) +
             math.cos(lat1)*math.sin(d/R)*math.cos(brng))

lon2 = lon1 + math.atan2(math.sin(brng)*math.sin(d/R)*math.cos(lat1),
                     math.cos(d/R)-math.sin(lat1)*math.sin(lat2))

print(lat2)
print(lon2)

I get

lat2 = 0.472492248844 
lon2 = 79.4821662373
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1  
What is the problem? –  GWW Aug 28 '11 at 17:00
    
@GWW I was getting an answer that didn't make sense. The reason it didn't make sense because because I wasn't converting the answers back to degrees. Code changed and included in the original post as an edit. –  David M Aug 28 '11 at 17:05
3  
You should simply submit your edit as an answer, and accept that answer, to make it more clear that you resolved your own problem. Otherwise, SO will penalise you for leaving an question unresolved, making it slightly more likely that future users will not bother to answer your questions. –  Cerin Oct 12 '11 at 21:35
    
You will get better precision and results if you use numpy objects. –  Mike Pennington Oct 16 '11 at 11:52
    
@Cerin - thanks for the advice. –  David M Oct 20 '11 at 11:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Needed to convert answers from radians back to degrees. Working code below:

import math

R = 6378.1 #Radius of the Earth
brng = 1.57 #Bearing is 90 degrees converted to radians.
d = 15 #Distance in km

#lat2  52.20444 - the lat result I'm hoping for
#lon2  0.36056 - the long result I'm hoping for.

lat1 = math.radians(52.20472) #Current lat point converted to radians
lon1 = math.radians(0.14056) #Current long point converted to radians

lat2 = math.asin( math.sin(lat1)*math.cos(d/R) +
     math.cos(lat1)*math.sin(d/R)*math.cos(brng))

lon2 = lon1 + math.atan2(math.sin(brng)*math.sin(d/R)*math.cos(lat1),
             math.cos(d/R)-math.sin(lat1)*math.sin(lat2))

lat2 = math.degrees(lat2)
lon2 = math.degrees(lon2)

print(lat2)
print(lon2)
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1  
I try this but just get the same start point returned? –  user1561108 Feb 3 '13 at 15:28

The geopy library supports this:

import geopy
from geopy.distance import VincentyDistance

# given: lat1, lon1, b = bearing in degrees, d = distance in kilometers

origin = geopy.Point(lat1, lon1)
destination = VincentyDistance(kilometers=d).destination(origin, b)

lat2, lon2 = destination.latitude, destination.longitude

Found via http://stackoverflow.com/a/4531227/37610

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lon1 and lat1 in degrees

brng = bearing in radians

d = distance in km

R = radius of the Earth in km

lat2 = math.degrees((d/R) * math.cos(brng)) + lat1
long2 = math.degrees((d/(R*math.sin(math.radians(lat2)))) * math.sin(brng)) + long1

I implemented your algorithm and mine in PHP and benchmarked it. This version ran in about 50% of the time. The results generated were identical, so it seems to be mathematically equivalent.

I didn't test the python code above so there might be syntax errors.

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Not working. From North to South, result is correct but it's wrong in "East-West" direction. –  Peter Nov 14 '14 at 20:01

Maybe a bit late for answering, but after testing the other answers, it appears they' dont work correctly. Here is a PHP code we use for our system. Working in all directions.

PHP code:

lat1 = latitude of start point in degres

long1 = longitude of start point in degres

d = distance in km

angle = bearing in degres

function get_gps_distance($lat1,$long1,$d,$angle)
{
    // Our beautifull planet
    $R = 6378.14;

    // Deg to Rad
    $latitude1 = $lat1 * (M_PI/180);
    $longitude1 = $long1 * (M_PI/180);
    $brng = $angle * (M_PI/180);

    $latitude2 = asin(sin($latitude1)*cos($d/$R) + cos($latitude1)*sin($d/$R)*cos($brng));
    $longitude2 = $longitude1 + atan2(sin($brng)*sin($d/$R)*cos($latitude1),cos($d/$R)-sin($latitude1)*sin($latitude2));

    // back to degres
    $latitude2 = $latitude2 * (180/M_PI);
    $longitude2 = $longitude2 * (180/M_PI);

    // 6 dec. for Leaflet and other system compatibility
   $lat2 = round ($latitude2,6);
   $long2 = round ($longitude2,6);

   // Push in array and get back
   $tab[0] = $lat2;
   $tab[1] = $long2;
   return $tab;
 }

Result is OK in all directions. hope this will help.

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Also late but for those who might find this, you will get more accurate results using the geographiclib library. Check out the geodesic problem descriptions and the JavaScript examples for an easy introduction to how to use to answer the subject question as well as many others. Implementations in a variety of languages including Python. Far better than coding your own if you care about accuracy; better than VincentyDistance in the earlier "use a library" recommendation. As the documentation says: "The emphasis is on returning accurate results with errors close to round-off (about 5–15 nanometers)."

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