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I've become a maintainer of a shared library project. The library is split into a few modules, each of them compiled as static library, then linked together. Eclipse is used as IDE, code stored at SVN server. So far the building process was handlet by hand - building libraries, moving all the .a and .h into shared folder, then building the shared library. The code needs to be compiled for linux, ARM and windows.

The problem is that I need to split the current modules a little bit more, for better testing (multiple test and example simple programs, just one .cpp file with main) and inter-module code sharing (both module A and B use C, but I don't want to connect A and B). This results into more complex dependency tree which is going to be difficult to handle by hand. I also need to be able to build more configurations of one project, possibly linking to different version of dependent projects.

How would you organise the code and set up the development environment?

EDIT: the concrete things I need from the DE:

  1. IDE with GUI (I like vim and shell, but the others don't)
  2. Separate projects, each creating static library, set of headers to include and example programs
  3. Different configurations for each project, linking/including different versions and/or configurations of dependencies
  4. Code completion and SVN support
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possible duplicate of Getting started with a cross platform C++ project there are lots of other similar questions too... –  rubenvb Aug 28 '11 at 19:44
    
rubenvb: the other guy is asking about something else (compilation in both eclipse and vs2010), but thanks for the link anyway - I will take a look at Scons –  Dadam Aug 28 '11 at 20:53

2 Answers 2

make and Makefiles are the established and very well-thought-out method for such building and linking jobs, especially in combination with automake and libtool. These tools integrate excellently with SVN, and probably also with Eclipse.

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There are two options for c++ project in Eclipse. First has makefiles generated by Eclipse. Custom ones can be included, but AFAIK it doesn't use varialbes like ${CC}, so writing a makefile for examples building is quite hacky. Second option is pure user-provided makefiles. I use this one so far, switching configurations by environment variables, but here I am loosing some Eclipse features (like specifying per-configuration include or library list). –  Dadam Aug 28 '11 at 20:48
    
If you want to publish your project at all, drop all Eclipse-only features in the Makefile and use Eclipse for the code editing, not the build automation. Really. The autotools (autoconf and automake) provide you with all the configuration options you need, they can be edited and distributed text-only, and especially they are the de-facto standard used by 90% of open source projects. Thereby they are much easier to use, understand and build. –  thiton Aug 29 '11 at 6:25
    
I will not publish it - it is a part of a bigger project maintained by the university –  Dadam Aug 29 '11 at 7:46
    
Autotools on Windows are slow and kind of unreliable. You'll need to build through Cygwin or MSYS, which brings a lot of problems with it... –  rubenvb Aug 29 '11 at 8:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So I solved it for now. I created a folder called Pool. Directory tree:

Pool
 - inc
    - arm
      - proj1 public headers directory
      - proj2 public headers directory
      - proj3 public headers directory
    - lin
      - proj1 public headers directory
      - proj2 public headers directory
      - proj3 public headers directory
    - win
      - proj1 public headers directory
      - proj2 public headers directory
      - proj3 public headers directory
 -lib
    - arm
      - libproj1.a
      - libproj2.a
      - libproj3.a
    - lin
      - libproj1.a
      - libproj2.a
      - libproj3.a
    - win
      - libproj1.a
      - libproj2.a
      - libproj3.a

The libraries are copied here automatically using makefile. Including header:

#include "proj1/someheader.h"

Linking it:

-L${POOL}/lib/arm -lproj1

Note: beware of -l library parameters order.

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