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In Java I can pass a Scanner a string and then I can do handy things like, scanner.hasNext(), or scanner.nextInt(), scanner.nextDouble(), etc.

This allows some pretty clean code for parsing a string that contains rows of numbers.

How is this done in C# land?

If you had a string that say had:

"0 0 1 22 39 0 0 1 2 33 33"

In Java I would pass that to a scanner and do a

while(scanner.hasNext()) 
    myArray[i++] = scanner.nextInt();

Or something very similar. What is the C#'ish way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Out of interest (for us C# folks) could you show code for how a scanner is initialized - for example, do you need to tell it the type you are scanning for? –  Steve Haigh Apr 6 '09 at 16:59
    
Scanner s = new Scanner(input) where input is many different types of things (String, File, Readable, InputStream, etc..) java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Scanner.html. Also there are hasNext (like hasNextInt()) methods to see if what you are looking for is the next thing to be read. –  TofuBeer Apr 6 '09 at 17:08
    
It also has a generic hasNext() to simply see if there are any tokens of any type left in the string. –  Simucal Apr 6 '09 at 18:28

6 Answers 6

I'm going to add this as a separate answer because it's quite distinct from the answer I already gave. Here's how you could start creating your own Scanner class:

class Scanner : System.IO.StringReader
{
  string currentWord;

  public Scanner(string source) : base(source)
  {
     readNextWord();
  }

  private void readNextWord()
  {
     System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
     char nextChar;
     int next;
     do
     {
        next = this.Read();
        if (next < 0)
           break;
        nextChar = (char)next;
        if (char.IsWhiteSpace(nextChar))
           break;
        sb.Append(nextChar);
     } while (true);
     while((this.Peek() >= 0) && (char.IsWhiteSpace((char)this.Peek())))
        this.Read();
     if (sb.Length > 0)
        currentWord = sb.ToString();
     else
        currentWord = null;
  }

  public bool hasNextInt()
  {
     if (currentWord == null)
        return false;
     int dummy;
     return int.TryParse(currentWord, out dummy);
  }

  public int nextInt()
  {
     try
     {
        return int.Parse(currentWord);
     }
     finally
     {
        readNextWord();
     }
  }

  public bool hasNextDouble()
  {
     if (currentWord == null)
        return false;
     double dummy;
     return double.TryParse(currentWord, out dummy);
  }

  public double nextDouble()
  {
     try
     {
        return double.Parse(currentWord);
     }
     finally
     {
        readNextWord();
     }
  }

  public bool hasNext()
  {
     return currentWord != null;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thats kinda handy :) –  Christopher Klein Apr 6 '09 at 18:58
    
@BlueMonkMN, thanks for the effort! It looks good so far. –  Simucal Apr 6 '09 at 20:03
    
Even though this code can handily represent functionality similar to what Java provides, I suspect the same problem could be solved more efficiently by some similar alternative that doesn't have to parse the value twice (once to see if it can be parsed and once to actually get the value). –  BlueMonkMN Apr 6 '09 at 21:33

To my knowledge, there are no built in classes in the framework for doing this. You would have to roll your own.

That would not be too hard. A nice C# version might implement IEnumerable so you could say:

var scanner = new Scanner<int>(yourString);
foreach(int n in scanner)
    ; // your code
share|improve this answer
1  
The whole point to the scanner was that it works for any number (not only integers.) –  Samuel Apr 6 '09 at 16:54
    
No: the sample code only works for integers in the same way this code does. I like the generic idea. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 6 '09 at 17:04
2  
the Scanner class has many more methods, and often they are used to read different things from the same Scanner. For example read a String then read a number. –  TofuBeer Apr 6 '09 at 17:05
    
This would certainly work, but you can use the built-in language facilities for traversing collections and performing transformations (lambdas) like I outlined without having to roll your own. To each his own! –  Adam Robinson Apr 6 '09 at 17:06
    
All-in-all, the implementation you choose and it's completeness, really depends on what needs to be accomplished. –  driis Apr 6 '09 at 17:08

While this isn't the exact same fundamental concept, what you're looking for can be done with this lambda expression:

string foo = "0 0 1 22 39 0 0 1 2 33 33";

int[] data = foo.Split(' ').Select(p => int.Parse(p)).ToArray();

What this does is first Split the string, using a space as a delimiter. The Select function then allows you to specify an alias for a given member in the array (which I referred to as 'p' in this example), then perform an operation on that member to give a final result. The ToArray() call then turns this abstract enumerable class into a concrete array.

So in this end, this splits the string, then converts each element into an int and populates an int[] with the resulting values.

share|improve this answer
    
The whole point to the scanner was that it works for any number (not only integers.) –  Samuel Apr 6 '09 at 16:53
    
Then apply the same concept, just replace int.Parse with double.Parse, float.Parse, etc. –  Adam Robinson Apr 6 '09 at 16:55
    
That's still missing the point. What if he string has 5 integers, 2 doubles and a float? Your solution doesn't help at all. –  Samuel Apr 6 '09 at 16:58
2  
The programmer calls it, because they want to know if a float or double is the next token. Perhaps you should read the Java docs for Scanner? –  Samuel Apr 6 '09 at 17:13
1  
I don't have any need to read the Java docs...I'm not a Java developer, I'm a C# developer here to answer a C# question. I'm also not interested in arguing with someone who's trolling for one. –  Adam Robinson Apr 6 '09 at 17:15

You could use linq to accomplish this like so:

string text = "0 0 1 22 39 0 0 1 2 33 33";
text.Where(i => char.IsNumber(i)).Write(); // do somthing usefull here...
share|improve this answer

To get as close as possible to your syntax, this'll work if you're only interested in one type ("int" in the example):

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   if (args.Length == 0) { args = new string[] { "3", "43", "6" }; }
   IEnumerator<int> scanner = (from arg in args select int.Parse(arg)).GetEnumerator();
   while (scanner.MoveNext())
   {
      Console.Write("{0} ", scanner.Current);
   }            
}

Here's an even more whiz-bang version that allows you to access any type that is supported by string's IConvertible implementation:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    if (args.Length == 0) { args = new string[] { "3", "43", "6" }; }
    var scanner = args.Select<string, Func<Type, Object>>((string s) => {
            return (Type t) =>
            ((IConvertible)s).ToType(t, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); 
        }).GetEnumerator();
    while (scanner.MoveNext())
    {
        Console.Write("{0} ", scanner.Current(typeof(int)));
    }            
}

Just pass a different type to the "typeof" operator in the while loop to choose the type.

These both require the latest versions of C# and the .NET framework.

share|improve this answer

I would do this in one of a couple ways depending on whether 1) you are using the latest .NET framework with LINQ support and 2) you know the values are valid integers. Here's a function to demonstrate both:

  int[] ParseIntArray(string input, bool validateRequired)
  {
     if (validateRequired)
     {
        string[] split = input.Split();
        List<int> result = new List<int>(split.Length);
        int parsed;
        for (int inputIdx = 0; inputIdx < split.Length; inputIdx++)
        {
           if (int.TryParse(split[inputIdx], out parsed))
              result.Add(parsed);
        }
        return result.ToArray();
     }
     else
        return (from i in input.Split()
                select int.Parse(i)).ToArray();
  }

Based on comments in other answer(s), I assume you need the validation. After reading those comments, I think the closest thing you'll get is int.TryParse and double.TryParse, which is kind of a combination of hasNextInt and nextInt (or a combination of hasNextDouble and nextDouble).

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