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I'm trying to leverage the node-request module, but the documentation isn't that great. If I make a request to a valid resource and pipe it to a Writable Stream, everything works fine. However, if I make a request to an invalid object, the Writable Stream is still created. Example, take the following snippet:

var x = request("http://localhost:3000/foo.jpg");
var st = fs.createWriteStream("foo.jpg");
x.pipe(st);

If the foo.jpg resource exists on the server, the data is piped to the stream, and it creates the file fine on the server. However, if foo.jpg does not exist on the server, a blank container file is still created. There appears to be no error event or anything that can be leveraged to determine if the request returned a 404. I've tried something like the following:

var x = request("http://localhost:3000/foo.jpg", function(err, response, body) {
    if(response.statusCode === 200) {
        // Success
        var st = fs.createWriteStream("foo.jpg");
        x.pipe(st);
    }
});

And also:

request("http://localhost:3000/foo.jpg", function(err, response, body) {
    if(response.statusCode === 200) {
        // Success
        var x = response.request;
        var st = fs.createWriteStream("foo.jpg");
        x.pipe(st);
    }
});

To no avail. The idea is pretty simple; I just want to copy a file identified by the URL to the local server. If the request is invalid (404, etc), don't pipe the file; if the request is valid, pipe the file. Any suggestions?

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Wait, I'm not exactly sure what you want to accomplish here. What do you want copied and when? –  Qcom Aug 28 '11 at 19:56
4  
For the love of god use request instead of node-request. –  Raynos Nov 24 '11 at 3:01

4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Why not use the http module directly.http.request

It has an 'error' event which you can use to catch the error.

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5  
Because http.request is a low level API compared to request. It's a pain to use –  Raynos Nov 24 '11 at 3:03
    
I suppose the native http.request may be the way to go. –  naivedeveloper Mar 9 '12 at 15:16

i wrote request :)

you might want to try this

var r = request(url)
r.on('response', function (resp) {
   resp.headers 
   resp.statusCode
   r.pipe(new WritableStream())
})
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and how would you retry the request if status code was 503 and you wanted to pipe the response to your server's response? –  naugtur Sep 30 at 11:42
    
found a way. check my answer. –  naugtur Oct 2 at 14:31

@Mikeal solution looks great, but may have some problem with the piping (first few bytes can be missed). Hee is an updated code:

var r = request(url)
r.pipe(new WritableStream());
r.on('response', function (resp) {
   resp.headers 
   resp.statusCode
   // Handle error case and remove your writablestream if need be.
})
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Dude You are awesome! closing the writableStream worked. Not doing so crash exits the process. Cheers ! –  FacePalm Feb 22 at 5:57

The way I ended up succeeding with new Streams in node:

function doQuery(){
    var r = request(url)
    r.pause()
    r.on('response', function (resp) {
       if(resp.statusCode === 200){
           r.pipe(new WritableStream()) //pipe to where you want it to go
           r.resume()
       }else{  }
    })
}

This is really flexible - if you want to retry, you can call the function recursively with setTimeout

function doQuery(){
    var r = request(url)
    r.pause()
    r.on('response', function (resp) {
       if(resp.statusCode === 200){
           r.pipe(new WritableStream()) //pipe to where you want it to go
           r.resume()
       }else{ 
           setTimeout(doQuery,1000)
       }
    })
}
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