Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a subroutine or function an input variable can be defined with intent(in) and the compiler assures that within the subroutine the variable can not be altered. As soon as the variable is passed (by reference) to another subroutine this subroutine is able to alter the variable without compiler warning.

This was tested with gfortran with the code:

program Test
    integer i
    i = 21 ! half the truth
    call test(i)
    write (*,*) "21 expected, but is 42: ", i
end program

subroutine test(i)
    integer, intent(in) :: i
    call doSomethingNasty(i)
end subroutine

subroutine doSomethingNasty(i)
    integer :: i
    i = 42 ! set the full truth ;-)
end subroutine

My questions are:

  1. Is this the normal behaviour for all compilers?
  2. Is there a way to force the compilers to assure that the variable is really constant and that alterations would be presented as compiler errors? I mean something like the const keyword in C/C++ which is also checked against the called functions which also need to assure that the constant is treated accordingly and that no reference is escaping.
  3. I found the possibility to pass the variable to the subroutine by "value" via passing it trough an expression like test((i)). For numeric variables, this is understandable and ok, but this seems to work with gfortran for arrays, derived types and pointers, too. Does this work with other compilers, too? Is it a safe way to protect my local variables?
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

With sufficient compiler options gfortran generates a warning for your example, that an implicit interface is used.

If you make the interface explicit by placing the subroutines into a module, and use intents for all arguments, gfortran will catch the problem:

module mysubs

contains

subroutine test(i)
    integer, intent(in) :: i
    call doSomethingNasty(i)
end subroutine

subroutine doSomethingNasty(i)
    integer, intent (inout) :: i
    i = 42 ! set the full truth ;-)
end subroutine


end module mysubs


program Test_intent_in

use mysubs

    integer i
    i = 21 ! half the truth
    call test(i)
    write (*,*) "21 expected, but is 42: ", i

end program Test_intent_in

gfortran gives error message:

call doSomethingNasty(i)
                          1
Error: Procedure argument at (1) is INTENT(IN) while interface specifies INTENT(INOUT)

When pass the argument "(i)" you are passing an expression rather than a variable. The expression is not definable and thus should not be used as an actual argument for an "out" or "inout" dummy argument.

Another approach for argument "safety": you can also use the "value" attribute in the declaration of a dummy argument to essentially make a local copy of the argument and guarantee that the actual argument won't be altered.

Edit: As kemiisto pointed out, "contains" also makes the interface known. I don't like "contains" because the variable scoping ... all variables of the parent program are visible. Try this test code out:

PROGRAM contains_tst

  INTEGER :: i, m

  i = 21
  m = 22
  CALL test(m)

  CONTAINS

    SUBROUTINE test(j)
      INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: j
      write (*, *) i, j
    END SUBROUTINE test

END PROGRAM contains_tst
share|improve this answer
    
The interesting thing is that this warning doesn't appear when you do not specify intent (inout) for i in doSomethingNasty. One more reason to specify intent for every variable in the code. :) –  Wildcat Aug 28 '11 at 20:29
    
Wow, interesting... Why does the compiler not complain about it, if the subroutine is not within a module!? Or when intent(inout) is not specified? I come from C/C++ and Java and I have some trouble to deal with Fortran due to such differences... But this gives some ideas about the design guidelines for the development crew, I guess. –  Rick-Rainer Ludwig Aug 28 '11 at 21:52
4  
If the interface is not "explicit", then the compiler doesn't "know" the interface and doesn't check for consistency between caller and callee. It is an issue of INTER-procedure checking. The easiest way to make the interfaces explicit is to place your procedures into a module. (You could use interface statements, but that's more work and error prone.) Placing your procedures in a module allows the compiler to do a lot of consistency checking -- it is a big help to the programmer! Without specifying the intent, the argument usage might be OK and so the usage isn't an error. –  M. S. B. Aug 29 '11 at 4:05

As soon as the variable is passed (by reference)

A warning note: Fortran standard does not specify how variables are passed (by reference, by value or in any other way). This is implementation dependent. Fortran is quite different from C/C++. Better stop to think in C-way. It will be misleading.

1) Yes and no. It is implementation dependent. First of all INTENT attribute specifies your intentions. As you can see in Fortran standard, Section 5.3.10, NOTE 5.17 (you can get the Final Draft of so-called Fortran 2008 by link at the beginning of this page http://fortranwiki.org/fortran/show/Fortran+2008):

Argument intent specifications serve several purposes in addition to documenting the intended use of dummy arguments. A processor can check whether an INTENT (IN) dummy argument is used in a way that could redefine it. [...]

compiler ("processor") can (not should) check such things.

Secondly (as I already mentioned) you can not be sure that for argument with INTENT(IN) compiler will choose to pass it by value and not by reference. In this case the choice was by reference. At least it seems that i in test subroutine was passed by reference. The next subroutine. The default INTENT is INOUT. That is why it is possible to change the value of argument i (with unspecified that's why default INTENT) in doSomethingNasty. Once again i was passed by reference. Or maybe it even was "copy-in/copy-out". Such freedom exists to allow compiler perform optimizations.

2) No. If I understand you correctly you need something similar to constant references (to achieve what is called "const correctness"). But we do not even have references in Fortran, so obviously there are no constant references.

3) There is a way to protect local variables. As M. S. B. pointed out in his answer place your subroutines in MODULEs (or in CONTAINS section of main program) and always specify INTENT attributes for variables. I've tried to compile the code below with different Fortran compilers available to me

PROGRAM main

  INTEGER :: i

  i = 21
  CALL test(i)
  WRITE (*,*) "21 expected, but is 42: ", i

  CONTAINS

    SUBROUTINE test(i)
      INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: i
      CALL do_something_nasty(i)
    END SUBROUTINE test

    SUBROUTINE do_something_nasty(i)
      INTEGER, INTENT(INOUT) :: i
      i = 42
    END SUBROUTINE do_something_nasty

END PROGRAM main

and all compilers (GNU, Intel, Open64, Portland and g95) issued an error message. I think that other compilers (Pathscale, IBM) will behave the same way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Yes, I come from C/C++ and Java. I deal no with OpenMP and Fortran and look for a way to protect my variables to avoid race conditions. I would like to have a kind of constant reference, yes, or something similar. In the legacy code, the dependencies are not obvious and I hoped on the help of the compiler. Your answers are not very encouraging. ;-) I also read about pure functions. Functional programming is something I know. Maybe this helps. I have to think about it. Do you have a good source to get the most significant differences between Fortran and C/C++ explained? –  Rick-Rainer Ludwig Aug 28 '11 at 21:43
1  
Suddenly I don't remember any source which explains differences between Fortran and C/C++. But cs.rpi.edu/~szymansk/OOF90/bugs.html might be useful. As a quick modern Fortran tutorial I recommend this one www-uxsup.csx.cam.ac.uk/courses/Fortran –  Wildcat Aug 29 '11 at 5:26
    
Thanks, I will study the links. –  Rick-Rainer Ludwig Aug 29 '11 at 6:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.