Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, should be straight forward question.

Lets say I have a class with alot of dumb fields like

String thizz;
long that;
Boolean bar;

How can I with reflection see if the fields thizz, that and bar have been initalized or left to their default values of null, 0 and false?

share|improve this question
    
why is reflection necessary? Can't you just check them? –  Paul Bellora Aug 28 '11 at 19:55
    
Because I dont know how many and what fields the other object has, it changes a lot... –  rapadura Aug 28 '11 at 19:57
1  
Please note that the default value of Boolean is null. Perhaps you had boolean in mind? –  BalusC Aug 28 '11 at 20:01
    
Wait, so are you asking how to dynamically look up an object's fields and values? That's kind of a different question. –  Paul Bellora Aug 28 '11 at 20:03
    
This is the default values for java types: download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/… –  Lynch Aug 28 '11 at 20:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have only 7 primitive types and one reference type to check. If you group all Number types together, you only have three values to check for.

Object o =
for (Field field : o.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
 Class t = field.getType();
 Object v = field.get(o);
 if(t == boolean.class && Boolean.FALSE.equals(v)) 
   // found default value
 else if(t.isPrimitive() && ((Number) v).doubleValue() == 0)
   // found default value
 else if(!t.isPrimitive() && v == null)
   // found default value
}  
share|improve this answer

You don't need reflection...

if (thizz == null) {
    //it's not initialized
}
if (that == 0) {
   //it's not initialized
}
if(bar == false) {
    //it's not initialized
}

However, they could have been initialized then reset to their default values. If you truly want to know if they're been initialized you could do something like this:

private boolean isFooInitialized = false;
private Foo foo;
public void setFoo(Foo foo) {
    this.foo = foo;
    isFooInitialized = foo != null;
}

/edit To get all the fields from a class, check out Class.getDeclaredFields(). This will give every field, not just the public ones.

From here you can check the type of the field and get its value:

Foo foo = ...
Field[] fooFields = foo.getClass().getDeclaredFields();
for (Field fooField : fooFields) {
    Class<?> fooFieldClass = fooField.getClass();
    if (fooFieldClass.equals(int.class)) {
        if (fooField.getInt(foo) == 0) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooFieldClass.equals(double.class)) {
        if (fooField.getDouble(foo) == 0) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooFieldClass.equals(boolean.class)) {
        if (fooField.getBoolean(foo) == false) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooFieldClass.equals(float.class)) {
        if (fooField.getFloat(foo) == 0) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooFieldClass.equals(char.class)) {
        if (fooField.getChar(foo) == 0) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooFieldClass.equals(byte.class)) {
        if (fooField.getByte(foo) == 0) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooFieldClass.equals(long.class)) {
        if (fooField.getLong(foo) == 0) {
            // not initialized
        }
    } else if (fooField.get(foo) == null) {
        // not initialized
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, let me restate my question, I actually dont care if the value has been initialized and later set to null or 0, I just need to check the default for all Javas possible types, primitives as well as java.lang objects –  rapadura Aug 28 '11 at 19:59
    
@AntonioP In that case, it's easy -- there are only ~7 (I could be wrong by one or two) different "default values". One for each primitive and one for non-primitives. A simple overloaded method could easily perform the check: bool IsDefault(bool b), bool IsDefault(long i), etc (some types can be doubled up, like int/long and float/double), modify for reflection as/if required. –  user166390 Aug 28 '11 at 20:05
    
@AntonioP updated my answer. –  Jeffrey Aug 28 '11 at 20:09
    
@Jeffrey, Yeah that was kind of what I did, except I used to check instance of Number, Boolean and String, the rest I assume are false anyway... –  rapadura Aug 28 '11 at 20:12
    
@AntonioP If you already did this, where's the problem with it? –  Jeffrey Aug 28 '11 at 20:13

This should get you going in the right direction.

    Class clazz = Class.forName("your.class");
    Field[] fields = clazz.getDeclaredFields();
    for (Field field : fields) {
      String dataType = field.getType().getName();
      if (dataType.equals("java.lang.String")) {
          System.out.println("found a string");
      }
    }
share|improve this answer

The gist of it is:

Field[] fields = yourObject.getClass().getFields();
for(Field f : fields)
{
  Class<?> k = f.getType();
  // depending on k, methods like f.getInt(yourObject),
  // f.getFloat(yourObject), 
  // f.getObject(hourObject) to get each member.
}

Now, this only lets you read the public fields.

Alternatively, IF your object follows getX/setX naming conventions, you can use getMethods(), and look for methods named "getXxx" and "setXxx", to infer the existence of settable fields -- and invoke those getters to look for the expected default values.

share|improve this answer
1  
Note that getFields() only returns public fields. –  Paul Bellora Aug 28 '11 at 20:11
    
Good point. Adding a note about this. –  david van brink Aug 28 '11 at 21:04

Peter Lawrey's answer works fine for me, except for fields of primitive data type char, which raises the following exception in my code :

java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.Character cannot be cast to java.lang.Number

So I added the char case :

Object o =
for (Field field : o.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
 Class t = field.getType();
 Object v = field.get(o);
 if (boolean.class.equals(t) && Boolean.FALSE.equals(v)) 
   // found default value
 else if (char.class.equals(t) && ((Character) v) != Character.MIN_VALUE)
   // found default value
 else if (t.isPrimitive() && ((Number) v).doubleValue() == 0)
   // found default value
 else if(!t.isPrimitive() && v == null)
   // found default value
}  

Character.MIN_VALUE is '\u0000', which is the default value of char according to the Java Documentation on primitive data types.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.