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I want to create getter/setter methods dyanmically to retrieve private properties.

This is what I did.

First of all, I made the class:

function winClass (posX, posY, w, h) {
  var x = posX || 0;
  var y = posY || 0;
  var width = w || 0;
  var height = h || 0;
}

Then I extended winClass with getter/setter methods, as follows:

winClass.prototype.getX = function () {
  return x;
}

winClass.prototype.setX = function (val) {
  x = val;
}

And then I tested:

var win1 = new winClass (10, 10, 100, 100);
document.write (win1.getX ());

But the following error comes when I try to setup the 'getX' method: 'x is not defined'. It makes sense because that 'x' isn't in the winClass scope but thus I don't know how to setup dynamically getter/setter methods for private variables.

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The getter/setters have to be in the scope that can see the private variables and the only scope that can see these variables is the internals of the constructor. That's why these variables are actually private. So, to make setters/getters for them, you have to put the functions in that scope that can see them. This will work:

function winClass (posX, posY, w, h) {
  var x = posX || 0;
  var y = posY || 0;
  var width = w || 0;
  var height = h || 0;

  this.getX = function() {return(x);}
  this.setX = function(newX) {x = newX;}
}

var win1 = new winClass (10, 10, 100, 100);
alert(win1.getX());   // alerts 10

You can see it work here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/hYps2/.

If you want a generic getter/setter for privates, you could do it like this:

function winClass (posX, posY, w, h) {
  var privates = {};
  privates.x = posX || 0;
  privates.y = posY || 0;
  privates.width = w || 0;
  privates.height = h || 0;

  this.get = function(item) {return(privates[item]);}
  this.set = function(item, val) {privates[item] = val;}
}

var win2 = new winClass(10,10,100,100);
alert(win2.get("x"));    // alerts 10

And, if you want to hack around the private nature of these variables which makes no sense to me (as you might as well make them standard instance variables then), you can do it like this:

function winClass (posX, posY, w, h) {
  var privates = {};
  privates.x = posX || 0;
  privates.y = posY || 0;
  privates.width = w || 0;
  privates.height = h || 0;

  this.getPrivates = function() {return(privates);}
}

winClass.prototype.getX = function() {
    return(this.getPrivates().x);
}

winClass.prototype.setX = function(newX) {
    this.getPrivates().x = newX;
}

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/EKHFh/.

Of course, this ruins the private nature of the variables so there isn't really any point in doing it this way as making them regular instance variables would be easier and have the same access control.

And, for completeness, here's the normal instance variable method that freely lets you add accessor methods to the prototype, but the variables aren't private.

function winClass (posX, posY, w, h) {
  this.x = posX || 0;
  this.y = posY || 0;
  this.width = w || 0;
  this.height = h || 0;
}

winClass.prototype.getX = function() {
    return(this.x);
}

winClass.prototype.setX = function(newX) {
    this.x = newX;
}
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Hence in Javascript the concept of prototype is a fudge to try to pretend that it is object oriented. –  Ed Heal Aug 28 '11 at 20:38
    
But this is a static declaration of getters/setters, not dynamic. I need to add them dynamically to winClass. –  Wilk Aug 28 '11 at 20:43
    
@Wilk - define "dynamic getter/setter" and please describe what you're trying to accomplish. –  jfriend00 Aug 28 '11 at 20:45
1  
As I have already said, these are private variables and the ONLY way you can get access to them is from within the constructor. Any way that allows you to get access to them from outside the constructor ruins the private nature of them and you might as well make them plain instance variables instead of privates. Pick which characteristics you want and then use that type of variable. Private is private. You can hack around it, but then they are no longer private. I'll add one more hack around the private, but there's literally no point because they should then be instance variables. –  jfriend00 Aug 28 '11 at 21:04
1  
@Ed Heal - You need to give prototypical inheritance more credit. Javascript't concept of Prototype comes from the Self language and (besides the syntax) is not a fudge at all. –  hugomg Aug 28 '11 at 23:05
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have a look at this it explains how to write C# style getters and setters in JavaScript. Very cool

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I have been playing around with this very thing the last few days. I would suggest looking at the module pattern, if you haven't already. There are plenty of resources on the subject, but I prefer this post. http://www.adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth

It handles OOP like public/private methods/variables very well.

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