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It turns out +0 === -0 evaluates to true despite +0 and -0 being different entities. So, how do you differentiate +0 from -0?

There is a hack:

if (1 / myZero > 0) {
   // myZero is +0
} else {
   // myZero is -0
}

Can I do better?

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9  
Why do you need to know this? (Not condescending... I am really curious!) –  Jason Gennaro Aug 28 '11 at 20:35
2  
your solution seems reasonable. (+0 === -0) being true seems like an oversight in the language so I don't know how else you'll resolve it. I wouldn't expect it to come up frequently. –  evan Aug 28 '11 at 20:35
8  
@evan, it's not an oversight, it's what IEEE 754 requires. –  John Flatness Aug 28 '11 at 20:42
1  
You don't need a function, just do this check: if ( 1 / x > 0 ) { ... –  Šime Vidas Aug 28 '11 at 20:44
2  
@Jason: I'm just playing around with the specs, and considering a bunch of thought experiments. These kind of bizarre things could potentially lead to difficult-to-find bugs. See one of my fears here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7223517/… –  Randomblue Aug 28 '11 at 21:02

4 Answers 4

This is still some kind of hack, but a look at the specs suggests this:

Math.atan2(0, -0) === Math.PI // true
Math.atan2(0,  0) === 0       // true
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Which specs are you referring to? ECMAScript? (Not doubting, I just want to know...) –  Jared Farrish Aug 28 '11 at 20:43
    
@Jared Farrish: Yes, the part of atan2. –  pimvdb Aug 28 '11 at 20:44
    
Do you have a link by chance? –  Jared Farrish Aug 28 '11 at 20:44
    
bclary.com/2004/11/07 15.8.2.5 –  pimvdb Aug 28 '11 at 20:45
    
@Jared es5.github.com/#x15.8.2.5 –  Šime Vidas Aug 28 '11 at 20:46

According to David Flanagan's book, p. 34, dividing 1 by your zero will produce the corresponding infinity, which can then be used in an equality check:

1 / 0
> Infinity
1 / -0
> -Infinity

And here's the behavior of the equality comparisons of infinities:

Infinity === -Infinity
> false
Infinity === Infinity
> true
-Infinity === Infinity
> false
-Infinity === -Infinity
> true
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This returns +0:

-0 + 0

This doesn't help to differenciate -0 and +0, but this helps in ensuring that some value is not -0.

1 / -0       => -Infinity  
1 / (-0 + 0) => Infinity
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2  
or you could use Math.abs(-0). –  evan Aug 28 '11 at 21:12
    
This is very useful for me because I needed to specifically ensure positive zero but leave other signed numbers alone. –  Semicolon Mar 23 at 4:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In ECMAScript 6, there is Object.is which is like === except that it distinguishes positive and negative zeroes, and Object.is(NaN, NaN) evaluates to true. (See here for a writeup.)

Chrome 24 has native support for Object.is without a flag.

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