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would like to have a central place to register new signals, connect to signals, and so on. now i thought to use sigc++. however, i don't know how to code a wrapper class for this template based lib. something along the lines of:

class EventManager {
public:
    ... singleton stuff ...
    template<typename ReturnType, typename Params>
    bool registerNewSignal( std::string &id )
    {
        sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params> *sig = new sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params>();

        // put the new sig into a map
        mSignals[ id ] = sig;
    }

    // this one should probably be a template as well. not very
    // convenient.
    template<typename ReturnType, typename Params>
    void emit( id, <paramlist> )
    {
        sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params> *sig = mSignals[ id ];
        sig->emit( <paramlist> );
    }

private:
    std::map<const std::string, ???> mSignals;
};

what should i replace the ??? with to make the map generic, but still be able to retrieve the according signal to the given id, and emit the signal with the given paramlist -- which i don't know how to handle either.

share|improve this question
    
I think this singleton design has several problems, for example you have to take care of synchronization issues (e.g. protect mSignals with a mutex) and potential race conditions. Why not use the sigc++ directly? –  dimitri Aug 28 '11 at 20:52
    
i need a central management point for events. –  noobsaibot Aug 28 '11 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'll need a base class which have emit() function:

template<class Ret>
class SigBase {
public:
  virtual Ret emit()=0;
};

and then some implementation of it:

template<class Ret, class Param1>
class SigDerived : public SigBase<Ret>
{ 
public:
  SigDerived(sigc::signal<Ret, Param1> *m, Param1 p) : m(m), p(p){ }
  Ret emit() { return m->emit(p); }
private:
  sigc::signal<Ret, Param1> *m;
  Param1 p;
};

Then the map is just pointer to base class:

std::map<std::string, SigBase<Ret> *> mymap;

EDIT: It might be better if the SigBase doesn't have the Ret value, but instead only supports void returns.

share|improve this answer
    
well yes, that would work. however, this implementation has to be provided by the client who shouldn't be bothered to do this in the first place. he is supposed to use my EventManager to register and fire the events. –  noobsaibot Aug 28 '11 at 21:05
    
wouldn't your register function just do it? It can do all the work internally. –  tp1 Aug 28 '11 at 21:09
    
yeah, i could take a pointer to the new signal. the point is, that the client shouldn't be bothered with implementing this in the first place. –  noobsaibot Aug 28 '11 at 21:12
    
I didn't get it why client would implement this instead of your eventmanager implementation? –  tp1 Aug 28 '11 at 21:14
    
because i can't say upfront what kind of signals the client want to use. –  noobsaibot Aug 28 '11 at 21:18

here's what i have so far. it works ... but feels like an abomination. how could i improve it further? for instance, how to get rid of the reinterpret_cast?

@dimitri: thanks for the tip with the mutex, i'll add that.

class Observer {
public:

    static Observer* instance()
    {
        if ( !mInstance )
            mInstance = new Observer();
        return mInstance;
    }

    virtual ~Observer() {}

    template<typename ReturnType, typename Params>
    sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params>* get( const std::string &id )
    {
        SignalMap::const_iterator it = mSignals.find( id );
        if ( it == mSignals.end() )
            return 0;

        return reinterpret_cast<sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params>*>( (*it).second );
    }

    template<typename ReturnType, typename Params>
    bool registerSignal( const std::string &id )
    {
        SignalMap::const_iterator it = mSignals.find( id );
        if ( it != mSignals.end() ) {
            // signal with the given id's already registered
            return false;
        }

        // create a new signal instance here
        sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params> *sig = new sigc::signal<ReturnType, Params>();
        mSignals[ id ] = reinterpret_cast<sigc::signal<void>*>(sig);

        return true;
    }

private:
    Observer()
    {
    }

    SignalMap           mSignals;
    static Observer*    mInstance;
};

Observer* Observer::mInstance = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
@tp1: any ideas as to how c++11 could help me here? –  noobsaibot Aug 30 '11 at 19:47

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