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I found myself in a desperate situation trying to understand the algorithm below. Does anyone recognize it?

It comes from a decompiled assembly. I am writing a PHP website front-end application and need to use passwords generated by this terrible piece of code as credentials to log in.

public static void Crypt(string ThisCle, string Buffer, long BufferLength)
{
    int index = 1;
    do
    {
        WUC.cry[index] = char.MinValue;
        checked { ++index; }
    }
    while (index <= 32000);
    WUC.cle = Conversions.ToCharArrayRankOne(ThisCle);
    WUC.si = 0;
    WUC.x1a2 = 0;
    WUC.i = 0;
    WUC.j = 0;
    WUC.l = 0;
    while ((long) WUC.j <= checked (BufferLength - 1L))
    {
        byte num1 = checked ((byte) Strings.Asc(Strings.Mid(Buffer, WUC.j + 1, 1)));
        WUC.Assemble();
        WUC.cfc = WUC.inter >> 8;
        WUC.cfd = WUC.inter & (int) byte.MaxValue;
        WUC.compte = 0;
        do
        {
            WUC.cle[WUC.compte] = Strings.Chr(Strings.Asc(WUC.cle[WUC.compte]) ^ (int) num1);
            checked { ++WUC.compte; }
        }
        while (WUC.compte <= 15);
        byte num2 = checked ((byte) ((int) num1 ^ (WUC.cfc ^ WUC.cfd)));
        byte num3 = (byte) ((uint) num2 >> 4);
        byte num4 = checked ((byte) ((int) num2 & 15));
        char ch;
        switch (num3)
        {
            case (byte) 0:
                ch = 'a';
                break;
            case (byte) 1:
                ch = 'b';
                break;
            case (byte) 2:
                ch = 'c';
                break;
            case (byte) 3:
                ch = 'd';
                break;
            case (byte) 4:
                ch = 'e';
                break;
            case (byte) 5:
                ch = 'f';
                break;
            case (byte) 6:
                ch = 'g';
                break;
            case (byte) 7:
                ch = 'h';
                break;
            case (byte) 8:
                ch = 'i';
                break;
            case (byte) 9:
                ch = 'j';
                break;
            case (byte) 10:
                ch = 'k';
                break;
            case (byte) 11:
                ch = 'l';
                break;
            case (byte) 12:
                ch = 'm';
                break;
            case (byte) 13:
                ch = 'n';
                break;
            case (byte) 14:
                ch = 'o';
                break;
            case (byte) 15:
                ch = 'p';
                break;
        }
        WUC.cry[checked (WUC.j * 2)] = ch;
        switch (num4)
        {
            case (byte) 0:
                ch = 'a';
                break;
            case (byte) 1:
                ch = 'b';
                break;
            case (byte) 2:
                ch = 'c';
                break;
            case (byte) 3:
                ch = 'd';
                break;
            case (byte) 4:
                ch = 'e';
                break;
            case (byte) 5:
                ch = 'f';
                break;
            case (byte) 6:
                ch = 'g';
                break;
            case (byte) 7:
                ch = 'h';
                break;
            case (byte) 8:
                ch = 'i';
                break;
            case (byte) 9:
                ch = 'j';
                break;
            case (byte) 10:
                ch = 'k';
                break;
            case (byte) 11:
                ch = 'l';
                break;
            case (byte) 12:
                ch = 'm';
                break;
            case (byte) 13:
                ch = 'n';
                break;
            case (byte) 14:
                ch = 'o';
                break;
            case (byte) 15:
                ch = 'p';
                break;
        }
        WUC.cry[checked (WUC.j * 2 + 1)] = ch;
        checked { ++WUC.j; }
    }
}

There's a "Decrpyt" method working in a similar way. The ciphers are 16 chars long.

share|improve this question
    
Could you add a flag in their user record in your DB that required them to reset their password once you migrate to the PHP site? Or add a Password2 file that was the newly calculated (Blowfish) hash that your new site will utilize (with the flag as a backup), but is generated on the current site iteration? –  Jared Farrish Aug 28 '11 at 23:27
    
@JarredFarrish Actually, I can't. It's only a PHP front-end, the apps are running side-by side. I thought I could decrypt all the passwords and generate and save a second hash for each user record, but I cannot modify the original application and would have to regenerate the passwords every day just to cover the case when someone's changed his/her password. –  David Aug 28 '11 at 23:38
    
But thanks for the idea anyway! –  David Aug 28 '11 at 23:41
1  
Oh gee. Maybe then a SOAP/XML-RPC port which would allow your PHP site to pass the credentials off and still have it authenticated? –  Jared Farrish Aug 28 '11 at 23:42
    
@JarredFarrish I am trying to avoid this, anyway, it's a fair "last chance" if nothing else works... –  David Aug 28 '11 at 23:59
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This looks like it could be the original (Delphi) source:

http://files.codes-sources.com/fichier_fullscreen.aspx?id=45245&f=pc1.pas&lang=en

It's a PC1 cipher, look here for some implementations in other languages.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks! It clearly appears to be a C# port of that code. I'll check out the PC1 cipher and let you know. –  David Aug 28 '11 at 23:49
    
@David I don't think so, I think it's the same code, there are versions of Delphi that generate .net code, which of course can be decompiled back to C#. The link I gave you contains a ready to use php version as well btw... –  fvu Aug 28 '11 at 23:51
    
You are right. I've noticed some minor differences which turned to be only small refactorings. (If something like "refactoring" can happen in a 1200 LOC static class.) I tried the PHP version and it works great. Thank's a lot! –  David Aug 28 '11 at 23:58
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