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we have a problem to use TransactionScope. TransactionScope get to us very good flexibility to use transactions across our Data Access Layer. On this way we can use transactions implicit or explicit. There are some performance boost again ADO.NET transactions, but at this time this is not really problem. However we have problem with locking. In example code below, although isolation level is set to ReadCommitted, it is not possible to make Select SQL statement from other client on table testTable, until the main transaction (in Main method) will be committed, because there is lock on whole table. We also tried to use only one connection across all methods, but same behavior. Our DBMS is SQL Server 2008. Is there something what we didn't understood?

Regards Anton Kalcik

See this sample code:

class Program
{
    public class DAL
    {
        private const string _connectionString = @"Data Source=localhost\fsdf;Initial Catalog=fasdfsa;Integrated Security=SSPI;";

        private const string inserttStr = @"INSERT INTO dbo.testTable (test) VALUES(@test);";

        /// <summary>
        /// Execute command on DBMS.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="command">Command to execute.</param>
        private void ExecuteNonQuery(IDbCommand command)
        {
            if (command == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("Parameter 'command' can't be null!");

            using (IDbConnection connection = new SqlConnection(_connectionString))
            {
                command.Connection = connection;
                connection.Open();
                command.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }

        public void FirstMethod()
        {
            IDbCommand command = new SqlCommand(inserttStr);
            command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@test", "Hello1"));

            using (TransactionScope sc = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required))
            {
                ExecuteNonQuery(command);
                sc.Complete();
            }
        }

        public void SecondMethod()
        {
            IDbCommand command = new SqlCommand(inserttStr);
            command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@test", "Hello2"));

            using (TransactionScope sc = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required))
            {
                ExecuteNonQuery(command);
                sc.Complete();
            }
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        DAL dal = new DAL();
        TransactionOptions tso = new TransactionOptions();
        tso.IsolationLevel = System.Transactions.IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted;

        using (TransactionScope sc = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required,tso))
        {
            dal.FirstMethod();
            dal.SecondMethod();
            sc.Complete();
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I don't think your issue has anything to do with the .NET TransactionScope concept. Rather, it sounds like you're describing the expected behavior of SQL Server transactions. Also, changing the isolation level only affects "data reads" not "data writes". From SQL Server BOL:

"Choosing a transaction isolation level does not affect the locks acquired to protect data modifications. A transaction always gets an exclusive lock on any data it modifies, and holds that lock until the transaction completes, regardless of the isolation level set for that transaction. For read operations, transaction isolation levels primarily define the level of protection from the effects of modifications made by other transactions."

What that means is that you can prevent the blocking behavior by changing the isolation level for the client issuing the SELECT statement(s). The READ COMMITED isolation level (the default) won't prevent blocking. To prevent blocking the client, you would use the READ UNCOMMITTED isolation level, but you would have to account for the possibility that records may be retrieved that have been updated/inserted by an open transaction (i.e. they might go away if the transaction rolls back).

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Thanks for your hint. So if understood it right, settings of transaction isolation level at TransactionScope will only affect how I will be able access data by read operation on DBMS from this transaction scope. –  Anton Kalcik Apr 6 '09 at 21:17
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Good question to talk about transactions.

Your main method is keeping transactions to commit. Even if you commit within other methods, you will still have locks on that row. You will not able to read that table with READ COMMITTED, which is expected, until you commit your locking transaction.

Here is after first method returns:

First method returns

After second method returns, you will add one more lock to table.

secont method returns

If we execute select statement from a query window with SPID(55), you will see wait status.

select is waiting

After you main method trans commits, you will get the select statement result and it will only show shared lock from our select statement query page.

Scope commits and select returns

X means exclusive lock, IX intent locks. You can read more from my blog post about transactions.

If you want to read without wait, you can use nolock hint. If you want to read after first method commits, you can remove that outer scope.

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