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I know this is silly question but I don't know which step I'm missing to count so can't understand why the output is that of this code.

int i=2;
int c;
c = 2 * - ++ i << 1;
cout<< c;

I have trouble to understanding this line in this code:

c = 2 * - ++ i <<1;

I'm getting result -12. But I'm unable to get it how is precedence of operator is working here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Have a look at the C++ Operator Precedence table.

  1. The ++i is being evaluated, yielding 3.
  2. The unary - is being evaluated, yielding -3.
  3. The multiplication is being done1, yielding -6.
  4. The bit shift is evaluated (shifting left by 1 is effectively multiplying by two) yielding -12.
  5. The result -12 is being assigned to the variable c.

If you used parentheses to see what operator precedence was doing, you'd get

c = ((2 * (-(++i))) << 1);

Plus that expression is a bit misleading due to the weird spacing between operators. It would be better to write it c = 2 * -++i << 1;

1 Note that this is not the unary *, which dereferences a pointer. This is the multiplication operator, which is a binary operator.

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Nice answer nad appreciate your result. But unary operator precedence is like this I read '! ~ + - ++ -- & *` R-L. So according t me the multiplication should be execute first or not? –  avirk Aug 29 '11 at 2:20
2  
Avrik, unary * is not multiplication, it's dereferencing. Multiplication is a binary operator. –  paxdiablo Aug 29 '11 at 2:22
    
@Avrik that statement can be written as ((2 * (-(++i))) << 1) or read as "Two times negative plus-plus-eye, then shift that left by one". –  Seth Carnegie Aug 29 '11 at 2:29
    
Its a silly question again how is shifting works there? @paxdiablo how is dereferencing please elaborate to me for understand it more clearly. –  avirk Aug 29 '11 at 3:09
    
@avirk as you know in a computer numbers are represented in binary. Using << on an integer moves each bit of the integer to the left the specified number of times. So because the binary representation of 6 is 110, 6 << 1 moves each bit to the left 1 place and so is 1100, or 12. The compiler preserves the sign of the integer, and that makes it -12. That's a simplification, but it's generally correct. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 29 '11 at 3:12

Operator precedence defined the grouping between the operators and their operands. In your example the grouping is as follows

c = ((2 * (-(++i))) << 1);

That's how "precedence of operator is working here" and that's the only thing it does.

The result of this expression is -6 shifted one bit to the left. This happens to be -12 on your platform.

According to your comment in another answer, you mistakenly believe that operator precedence somehow controls what is executed "first" and what is executed "next". This is totally incorrect. Operator precedence has absolutely nothing to do with the order of execution. The only thing operator precedence does, once again, is define the grouping between the operators and their operands. No more, no less.

The order of execution is a totally different thing entirely independent from operator precedence. In fact, C++ language does not define any "order of execution" for expressions containing no sequence points inside (the above one included).

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+1 for telling me that operator precedence somehow controls what is executed "first" and what is executed "next". This is totally incorrect. Operator precedence has absolutely nothing to do with the order of execution. –  avirk Aug 29 '11 at 3:29

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