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Sorry if this is a stupid question, but it's something that I'm curious about.

I am overloading the less-than operator for my sort algorithm based on last name, first name, middle name. I realize there is not a right or wrong here, but I'm curious as to which style is written better or preferred among fellow programmers.

bool CPerson::operator<(const CPerson& key) const
{
    if (m_Last < key.m_Last)
        || ( (m_Last == key.m_Last) && (m_First < key.m_First) )
        || ( (m_Last == key.m_Last) && (m_First == key.m_First) && (m_Middle < key.m_Middle) )
        return true;
    return false;
}

or

bool CPerson::operator<(const CPerson& key) const
{
    if (m_Last < key.m_Last)
        return true;
    else if ( (m_Last == key.m_Last) && (m_First < key.m_First) )
        return true;
    else if ( (m_Last == key.m_Last) && (m_First == key.m_First) && (m_Middle < key.m_Middle) )
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

or

bool CPerson::operator<(const CPerson& key) const
{
    if (m_Last < key.m_Last)
        return true;

    if (m_Last == key.m_Last)
        if (m_First < key.m_First)
            return true;

    if (m_Last == key.m_Last)
        if (m_First == key.m_First)
            if (m_Middle < key.m_Middle)
                return true;

    return false;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Which will someone else find easiest to debug and then correct? – Keith Aug 29 '11 at 3:29
    
@Keith yeah, that is something I would like to consider as well. – user898058 Aug 29 '11 at 3:33
2  
I prefer the 3rd, but it's buggy. Consider "A B C" vs "A C B" – Benjamin Lindley Aug 29 '11 at 3:34
    
@Benjamin: All of them are buggy. They are essentially the same expression. – David Hammen Aug 29 '11 at 3:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I prefer:

bool CPerson::operator<(const CPerson& key) const
{
    if (m_Last == key.m_Last) {
        if (m_First == key.m_First) {
            return m_Middle < key.m_Middle;
        }
        return m_First < key.m_First;
    }
    return m_Last < key.mLast;
}

Nice and systematic, and it is obvious how new members can be added.


Because these are strings, the repeated comparison may be needlessly inefficient. Following David Hamman's suggestion, here is a version which only does the comparisons once per string (at most):

bool CPerson::operator<(const CPerson& key) const
{
    int last(m_Last.compare(key.m_Last));
    if (last == 0) {
        int first(m_First.compare(key.m_First));
        if (first == 0) {
            return m_Middle < key.m_Middle;
        }
        return first < 0;
    }
    return last < 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Plus it's more succinct and clear. +1 – Seth Carnegie Aug 29 '11 at 3:33
    
Note well: This is not what the same code as the OP's code. Mankarse's code is correct, so +1. I prefer the compact boolean notation, but then again (as I noted in my answer) I am a bit weird in this regard. – David Hammen Aug 29 '11 at 3:45
    
@Mankarse Thanks, I'm glad I posted this question now. I totally missed your approach to the sort algorithm. (: – user898058 Aug 29 '11 at 3:46
    
@David Hammen - Yes, this does not give the same result. – Mankarse Aug 29 '11 at 3:54
    
@Mankarse. I spent some time with the algorithm and just came back to see that I ended up with the same setup as your second example. (: That does indeed seem more efficient. – user898058 Aug 29 '11 at 6:35

All of your implementations are essentially the same and they are all wrong by any reasonable definition of sort order for people's names. Your algorithm will place Jonathan Abbott Zyzzyk ahead of Jonathan Zuriel Aaron.

What you want is person A's name is less than person B's name if:

  • The last name of person A is less than the last name of person B or
  • The two have the same last name and
    • The first name of person A is less than the first name of person B or
    • The two have the same first name and the middle name of person A is less than the middle name of person B.

Whether you implement this as a single boolean expression versus a staged if/else sequence is a bit of personal preference. My preference is the single boolean expression; to me that logical expression is clearer than a cluttered if/else sequence. But apparently I'm weird. Most people prefer the if/else construct.

Edit, per request
As a single boolean expression,

bool Person::operator< (const Person& other) const {
  return (last_name < other.last_name) ||
         ((last_name == other.last_name) &&
          ((first_name < other.first_name) ||
           ((first_name == other.first_name) &&
            (middle_name < other.middle_name))));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would be curious to see your code for this. I am a bit of a "single boolean expression" person myself, but I can't see how it would avoid redundancy in this particular case. – Mankarse Aug 29 '11 at 3:57
    
Yeah, I saw the error in my logic as I was reading through all the comments/answers. I'm learning a lot from the comments and implementations of the the different approaches to the sort algorithm. Thank you! – user898058 Aug 29 '11 at 4:43
    
@Mankarse: I edited my answer to show the boolean expression. Note that this intentionally has redundant comparisons. See my alternative answer for a perhaps obscurative implementation that avoids the redundancy. – David Hammen Aug 29 '11 at 4:43
    
@Mankarse: The above comment is incorrect. Avoiding the redundancy using C++ booleans either results in undefined behavior or some truly hairy uses of the ternary operator. – David Hammen Aug 29 '11 at 4:51

I find the first one the most difficult to read of the three (although none of them are too difficult) and the first one has unnecessary parentheses. The second one is my personal preference, because the third one seems too long and verbose.

This really is subjective though.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was worried people would say it's subjective and a matter of personal preference. But I think I agree with your choice of the second example. Thank you! – user898058 Aug 29 '11 at 3:34

I normally write a comparison function roughly like this:

bool whatever::operator<(whatever const &other) { 

    if (key1 < other.key1)
        return true;

    if (other.key1 < key1)
        return false;

    // compare the second key item because the first ones were equal.
    if (key2 < other.key2) 
        return true;

    if (other.key2 < key2)
       return false;

    // repeat for as many keys as needed

    // for the last key item, we can skip the second comparison:
    if (keyN < other.keyN)
        return true;

    return false; // other.keyN >= keyN.
}
share|improve this answer

Along a slightly different vein, all of the solutions (including my first answer) tend to compare names twice, once for less than and again for equality. Since sort is at best an N*logN algorithm, efficiency can be quite important when sorting a big list of names, and these duplicative comparisons are rather inefficient. The string::compare method provides a mechanism for bypassing this problem:

bool Person::operator< (const Person& other) const {
  int cmp = last_name.compare (other.last_name);
  if (cmp < 0) {
     return true;
  } else if (cmp == 0) {
    cmp = first_name.compare (other.first_name);
    if (cmp < 0) {
      return true;
    } else if (cmp == 0) {
      cmp = middle_name.compare (other.middle_name);
      if (cmp < 0) {
        return true;
      }
    }
  }
  return false;
}

Edit, per request
Elided.

A boolean version of the above will either result in undefined behavior or will use multiple embedded uses of the ternary operator. It is ugly even given my penchant for hairy boolean expressions. Sorry, Mankarse.

share|improve this answer
    
Heh. No need to be sorry. ;) I think it can be done by defining a class to hold the intermediate state, but that is going far into the realms of absurd obfuscation. The problem is that you can't put statements in expressions in C++. – Mankarse Aug 29 '11 at 5:06
    
@David. Thanks, I ended up with a flavor similar to yours and Mankarse. I learned a lot from the logic used here. – user898058 Aug 29 '11 at 6:38

I like to reduce this to tuples, which already implement this kind of lexicographical ordering. For example, if you have boost, you can write:

bool Person::operator< (const Person& Rhs) const
{
  return boost::tie(m_Last, m_First, m_Middle) < boost::tie(Rhs.m_Last, Rhs.m_First, Rhs.m_Middle);
}
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