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If you don't use Java Generics, I believe it's not possible to have two methods in the same class that differ only in their return type.

In other words, this would be illegal:

public HappyEmotion foo(T emotion) {
    // do something
}   

public SadEmotion foo(T emotion) {
    // do something else
}   

Is the same true when overloading methods that return a generic type that may implement different interfaces, such as if the following two methods were present in the same class definition:

public <T extends Happy> T foo(T emotion) {
    // do something
}   

public <T extends Sad> T foo(T emotion) {
    // do something else
}   

Would this be illegal?

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2  
Did you try to compile it? A (conforming) compiler will promptly tell you what is legal and what is illegal. A better question would be 'why is ... illegal?' if you don't understand the reasons. –  Bruno Reis Aug 29 '11 at 4:33

4 Answers 4

This is legal since the input parameter too differs based on the type..

For this reason, following is legal,

public <T extends Happy> T foo(T emotion) {
    // do something
}   

public <T extends Sad> T foo(T emotion) {
    // do something else
}

But following is not,

public <T extends Happy> String foo(T emotion) {
    // do something
}   

public <T extends Happy> T foo(T emotion) {
    // do something else
} 

Thanks...

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This ran just fine.

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Main main = new Main();
        main.foo("hello");
        main.foo(new Integer(5));
    }

    public <T extends String> T foo(T emotion) {
        return (T) "test";
    }

    public <T extends Integer> T foo(T emotion) {
        Integer integer = 5;
        return (T) integer;
    } 
}
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You can use generic to distinguish the method in Java. The JVM doesn't see this type however provided the argument or return type is different it will still compile in the Sun/Oracle compiler. This doesn't compile for the IBM/eclipse compiler.

This shows you want is happening at the byte code level. http://vanillajava.blogspot.com/2011/02/with-generics-return-type-is-part-of.html

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It will compile, but where you get into problems is if either Happy or Sad is a superclass of the other.

For instance, the following compiles:

public <T extends Number> T sayHi() {
    System.out.println("number");
    return null;
}

public <T extends Integer> T sayHi() {
    System.out.println("integer");
    return null;
}

However, you run into problems when you try to compile the following:

Integer test = sayHi();

In this case, you simply cannot add <Integer> to the front because Integer is still both a Number and an Integer.

However the following compiles

Double test2 = <Double>sayHi();

so basically as long as a Sad object cannot be an instance of a Happy object and visa versa, your code should work as long as you call it with the or in front of the method name.

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