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Some binary tree data structures (such as Splay trees) will re-balance on reads to move recently accessed items toward the root, such that the subsequent look-up time may be reduced.

Are the standard containers (std::map, std::set) allowed to do this?

At least one concern is thread safety. Previously, I'd thought that as long as you were only doing read-only operations on standard containers, it was safe to do this from multiple threads without introducing mutexes/locks etc. Maybe I need to re-think this?

I know that typically red-black trees are used for the standard tree containers, and that these data structures aren't usually modified on reads. But would a hypothetical implementation that did modify be conforming?

My c++-standards-foo needs improvement, but I'm not sure whether the current standard addresses thread-safety for containers. Is this different in c++0x?

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Isn't this implementation dependant? doesn't the standard merely define an interface and expected behaviour? –  Matt Aug 29 '11 at 4:07
    
@Matt H: My thinking is that this would be "observable behaviour" (or however the standard puts it...) - so potentially something that should be addressed in a standardised way. Part of my question is whether it is addressed or not? –  Darren Engwirda Aug 29 '11 at 4:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

From the c++0x draft:

§23.2.2/1:

For purposes of avoiding data races (17.6.5.9), implementations shall consider the following functions to be const: begin, end, rbegin, rend, front, back, data, find, lower_bound, upper_bound, equal_range, at and, except in associative or unordered associative containers, operator[].

Note that c++03 does not say anything about multi-threading, but as you say, most implementations use RB-trees, which will not rebalance on a read operation.

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So, if I have it right - since find is const there is no re-balancing allowed on reads. The fact that operator[] is not const is just because it's allowed to insert a default item if no match is found. But this is only for c++0x... –  Darren Engwirda Aug 29 '11 at 4:24
    
@Darren Engwirda- Not exactly. There could still be a rebalance on a read, as long as it was implemented with an atomic commit. It shouldn't make any difference to your code though. –  Mankarse Aug 29 '11 at 4:29
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@Darren: operator[] is not on that list because operator[] will insert an element into the tree if it is not found. It is a modifying operation. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 29 '11 at 5:15
    
@Mankarse: Sorry if I'm not getting it, but if we have find() const { // etc... } doesn't the const aspect prevent any modification of the underlying tree structure. How could this allow modifications - even if they were thread-safe?? –  Darren Engwirda Aug 29 '11 at 21:58
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@Darren - When I said that it could modify the structure I was being pedantic. It is possible that an implementation could use mutable members and perform thread-safe rebalancing, but if this did happen, it would have to be in a way that would not change the meaning of your coded. Honestly, I think that it is such an unlikely implementation that the possibility could just be ignored. –  Mankarse Aug 30 '11 at 1:03

Read functions on maps etc. are required to have a const function defined. Hence you get the guarantee that the object hasn't changed.

This is true both for C++11 ( 23.4.4.1 ) as well as C++03 ( 23.3.1 ).

23.2.2 of the new C++11 standard may be of special interest here:

  1. For purposes of avoiding data races (17.6.5.9), implementations shall consider the following functions to be const: begin, end, rbegin, rend, front, back, data, find, lower_bound, upper_bound, equal_range, at and, except in associative or unordered associative containers, operator[].

  2. Notwithstanding (17.6.5.9), implementations are required to avoid data races when the contents of the contained object in different elements in the same sequence, excepting vector<bool>, are modified concurrently.

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const does not mean what you think it does. See the other comments. –  curiousguy Oct 1 '11 at 2:04
    
@curiousguy, I know what it means. But for typical circumstances, the informal promise is all we need. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Oct 1 '11 at 10:40
    
A class can implement a cache, and keep its const member functions const (hide the internal state changes), and still be MT-safe (avoid the data races with concurrent calls of const member functions), although this can be tricky. –  curiousguy Oct 2 '11 at 5:30

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