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I prefer working with CSS based design, but as more of a back end coder my CSS skills are a bit weak. When I get involved with layout, I tend to fall back on table based formatting because my mind has been warped by years of table based abuse. There's one particular problem that I always trip over. What is the best CSS alternative to:

<table width="100%">
    <tr>
        <td align="center">
            content goes here
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

I sometimes use:

<div style="width:100%; text-align:center">content</div>

But this doesn't seem quite right. I'm not trying to align text, I'm trying to align content. Also, this seems to have an effect on the text alignment of enclosed elements, which requires tweaking to fix. One thing I don't get is: why isn't there a float:center style? It seems like that would be the best solution. Hopefully, I'm missing something and there is a perfect CSS way to do this.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are right that text-align is intended for aligning text. It's actually only Internet Explorer that lets you center anything other than text with it. Any other browser handles this correctly and doesn't let block elements be affected by text-align.

To center block elements using css you use margin: 0 auto; just as d03boy suggested. Although you don't need to keep the table at all.

The reason that there is no float: center; is that floating is intended to place elements (typically images) either to the left or the right and have text flow around them. Floating something in the center doesn't make sense in this context as that would mean that the text would have to flow on both sides of the element.

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Nice catch with the table. I didn't look closely enough at that. –  Joe Philllips Apr 6 '09 at 19:17
    
Hi thanks the answer, it helps. But how margin: 0 auto; does the magic, I don't understand why zero and auto value will center the table? –  GMsoF Dec 14 '12 at 1:44
1  
@GMsoF: The zero is the vertical margin and the auto is the horisontal margin. margin: 0 auto; is the short form of margin: 0 auto 0 auto;, which is the short form of margin-top: 0; margin-right: auto; margin-bottom: 0; margin-left: auto;. –  Guffa Dec 14 '12 at 2:56

I would recommend putting a <div> into your <td> and setting the style attribute to style="width: 200px; margin: 0 auto;"

The catch is that you must set a fixed width.

Edit: After looking at the question again, I would recommend scrapping the table entirely. Just use a <div style="width: 200px; margin: 0 auto;> as I suggested and no need for a table.

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Hi thanks the answer, it helps. But how margin: 0 auto; does the magic, I don't understand why zero and auto value will center the table? –  GMsoF Dec 14 '12 at 1:45

Here is a good resource for centering using CSS.
http://www.w3.org/Style/Examples/007/center
This demonstrates how to center text, blocks, images and how to center them vertically.

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Where do you find yourself commonly doing this? For me - I am most often trying to center the entire design of the site, so I usually do this:

<html>
  <body>
  <div id="wrapper">
    <div id="header">
    </div>
    <div id="content">
    </div>
    <div id="footer">
    </div>
  </div>
  </body>
</html>


body {text-align:center;}
#wrapper {margin:0 auto; text-align:left; width:980px;}

This will center the entire design on the page at 980px width, while still leaving all of your text left aligned (as long as that text is within the #wrapper element).

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Use display:inline-block to enable text-align:center and center content without a fixed width:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <title>Centering</title>

  <style type="text/css">
  .container { text-align:center; }

  /* Percentage width */
  .wrapper { width: 99%; }

  /* Use inline-block for wrapper */
  .wrapper { display: inline-block; }

  /* Use inline for content */
  .content { display:inline; }
  </style> 

</head>
<body>
  <div class="container">
    <div class="content">
        <div class="wrapper">
            <div>abc</div>
            <div>xyz</div>
        </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>
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This is a nice trick! –  Paul Keister Oct 21 '12 at 22:54

d03boy's answer is correct for the right way to center things.

To answer your other comment, "Also, this seems to have an effect on the text alignment of enclosed elements, which requires tweaking to fix." That's the nature of how CSS works, setting a property on an element affects all of its children, unless the property is overridden by one of them (assuming the property is one that is inherited, of course).

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