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I'd like to pass a fixed seed (string) to a function, and then have it randomly select one item from a list. However, it should be the same item from the same list if the same seed it used! Obviously this isn't random at all, but it should more or less appear to be random and be about equally distributed. It must be quite fast too.

To demonstrate, this is how random works.

>>> random.seed('Python')
>>> random.choice([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0])
3
>>> random.choice([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0])
6
>>> random.choice([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0])
2

What I'd like is this.

>>> notrandom([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0],seed='Python')
4
>>> notrandom([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0],seed='Python')
4
>>> notrandom([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0],seed='Python')
4

It only needs to be reproducible if the same list is used with the same seed string.

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1  
This works so long as you re-seed random before every choice, which you aren't doing here. –  agf Aug 29 '11 at 6:46
5  
4. chosen by fair dice roll. guaranteed to be random. –  wim Aug 29 '11 at 6:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the Python doc for random, I think this is what you are looking for:

The functions supplied by this module are actually bound methods of a hidden instance of the random.Random class. You can instantiate your own instances of Random to get generators that don’t share state.

Like,

> r = random.Random()

> r.seed('Hi')
> r.random()
0.3787897089299177

> r.seed('Hi')
> r.random()
0.3787897089299177
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This will result in the same index being chosen for different lists of the same length (and generally the index being predictable for all lists if you know which was chosen for any list for a given seed) so you need to do something extra with the seed if you want different picks for different lists. –  agf Aug 29 '11 at 6:50

First time, pick a random number from list, then hash the seed and save the pair in an array.

Afterwards, Hash seed and use it as a key in your array.

It's obviously a crappy solution but I think here it could do the trick.

Edit: just saw it's for same input list too. So hash the list and save that hash as well.

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