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{%{$self->param}}

It does hash expand, and then create another hash reference.

But isn't {%{$self->param}} the same as $self->param? Why does the code bother doing the trick?

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1  
Does the code work both ways in your app? If not, then they are not the same. Sadly, the converse isn't always true –  EnabrenTane Aug 29 '11 at 7:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It copies the hash. Consider the following snippet:

use Data::Dumper;

my $foo = { a => 1, ar => [1] };
my $bar = {%$foo};

$bar->{b} = 2;
push @{$bar->{ar}}, 4;

print Dumper $foo;
print Dumper $bar;

It prints

$VAR1 = {
          'a' => 1,
          'ar' => [
                    1,
                    4
                  ]
        };
$VAR1 = {
          'a' => 1,
          'b' => 2,
          'ar' => [
                    1,
                    4
                  ]
        };

So you can see that the copy is shallow: Scalars are copied over, even if they are references. The referenced objects are the same (in this example the array referenced by ar).

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1  
It does a shallow copy; if some of the values are themselves references, the data referenced by those will stay shared between the two hashes. –  ysth Aug 29 '11 at 7:18
2  
Don't forget to mention that this makes a shallow (not deep) copy - e.g. the values of the hash that are references themselves will keep to the original locations in your new copy, and not be copied as well as the original hash –  DVK Aug 29 '11 at 7:22
    
@ysth: Yes, good point. I added this. –  musiKk Aug 29 '11 at 7:23

Although both {%{$self->param}} and $self->param are references to a hash, they do not refer to a hash stored in the same location.

The first expression dereferences $self->param to a hash, and returns a reference to an anonymous hash. Within the outer braces, %{$self->param} is actually expanded and copied temporarily, and then a reference to this temporary copy is returned, not to the old hash.

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This code actually creates a copy hash (shallow copy of keys and values, but not deep copy), reference to which is returned and returns reference to it.

If some sub returns reference to a hash and you change something in it, you actually are changing values in original hash. To avoid this we sometimes need to copy whole hash (or array) before making any changes.

Here's example:

sub get_hashref {
    my $hashref = shift;
    return $hashref;
}

my %hash = (foo => 'bar');

my $ref = get_hashref(\%hash);
$ref->{foo} = 'baz'; # Changes 'foo' value in %hash
print "Original 'foo' now is: $hash{foo}\n"; # 'baz'
print "Ref's 'foo' now is: $ref->{foo}\n";   # 'baz'

# But!

$ref = {%{ get_hashref(\%hash) }};
$ref->{foo} = 42; # No changes in %hash
print "Original 'foo' now is: $hash{foo}\n"; # 'baz'
print "Ref's 'foo' now is: $ref->{foo}\n";   # '42'

To be understood better, {%{ $self->param }} may be expanded to:

my $ref = $self->param; # Ref to original hash
my %copy = %{$ref}; # Copies keys and values to new hash
my $ref_to_copy = {%copy}; # get ref to it

You also may omit last step if you need hash but not reference to it.

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Don't forget to mention that this makes a shallow (not deep) copy - e.g. the values of the hash that are references themselves will keep to the original locations in your new copy, and not be copied as well as the original hash –  DVK Aug 29 '11 at 7:22
    
Thanks. I was wondering how to say it in a right way. –  yko Aug 29 '11 at 7:30

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