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Looking at similar questions, I actually want the exact opposite of this: SQL query for getting data in two fields from one column

I have a table meetings with paired users:

A_user_id | B_user_id
1               2
3               4

There is a user table as well.

Is there a simple mysql query that lists all the user_ids into one long list?

query result
1
2
3
4

I was thinking something like this but it doesn't work:

select *
from user 
where user.id in (
    (select A_user_id from meeting)
    or 
    (select B_user_id from meeting)
)

Thanks!

UPDATE (UNION solved this, but let's make this a bit more challenging):

I want to get a list of usernames and location names (both are reference tables) so I need to join this union query to them. Here's what I tried:

select u1.fname, l1.name
 from meeting m1
 join user u1 on m1.A_user_id=u1.id 
 join locations l1 on m1.location_id=l1.id
union
select u2.fname, l2.name
 from meeting m2
 join user u2 on m2.A_user_id=u2.id 
 join locations l2 on m2.location_id=l2.id
order by location_id asc

I'm getting two errors:

1- Not sure what kind of joins I need on these. (without the last 'order by' line) I'm getting a list of only 2 (there should be 4, as there are 2 pairs of people meeting). It seems to be pulling only the first item from each part of the union. I believe this relates to the type of join I'm doing for each, but not sure. So, users are distinct (there is only 1 user in the meeting table and it matches only 1 user in the user table), but locations are not (2 users are meeting at 1 location, and I think when I join on locations it is messing things up).

2- How do I use the "order by" at the end to order by the resulting list of "location_id"s, since now I have two named tables to deal with.

Thanks!

UPDATE 2:

Ok I put the two selects into parenthesis and UNIONed them and now I can order by the location_id... but I still have no idea how to join on the location table. Mysql doesn't like what I tried

(select u1.fname, m1.location_id
from meeting m1
join user u1 on m1.A_user_id=u1.id)
union
(select u2.fname, m2.location_id
from meeting m2
join user u2 on m2.B_user_id=u2.id)
#join locations l on l.id = location_id // this line messes things up *
order by location_id asc
  • Doesn't there need to be an all encompassing select around this whole thing? How do I join the locations.id field on the "location_id" field that gets kicked off of the union query? Since the "location_id" field is technically in two different tables? THe join above throws an error.

UPDATE 3: SOLVED

Here's my final query:

select tb1.fname, l.name
from (
    (select u1.fname, m1.location_id
    from meeting m1
    join user u1 on m1.A_user_id=u1.id)
    union
    (select u2.fname, m2.location_id
    from meeting m2
    join user u2 on m2.B_user_id=u2.id)
) tb1
join locations l on l.id = tb1.location_id
order by location_id asc
share|improve this question
    
Not following you. You want to get all the ids from the user table and all the ids from the meeting table... The meeting table id? or the meetings.userId? – Donnie Aug 29 '11 at 7:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted
select A_user_id as id from meetings
union
select B_user_id as id from meetings

in your example code, you could use an 'or', but the 'or' has to join two 'in' statements, if you get what I mean.

select *
from user 
where 
(
      (user.id in (select A_user_id from meeting))
   or 
      (user.id in ((select B_user_id from meeting))
)

And to answer you second update, you want something like

select locations.* from
(
   (select A_user_id as id from meeting)
   union
   (select B_user_id as id from meeting)
) as UIDS
join
locations on locations.id = UIDS.id
share|improve this answer
    
wow that was fast - thanks! this must be the example usage for union :-) – Jeff Aug 29 '11 at 7:05
    
it's not far off :) – Burleigh Bear Aug 29 '11 at 7:05
    
mind taking a stab at my updated attempt? – Jeff Aug 29 '11 at 7:34
    
The 'or' operator is a logical connective. That is, it operates on parameters of true and false. Your example tries to combine two sets of results using 'or'. – Burleigh Bear Aug 29 '11 at 7:38
    
sorry, meant up top (i added an update to my original question) – Jeff Aug 29 '11 at 7:47
select A_user_id as user_id from meetings
union all
select B_user_id as user_idfrom meetings
order by user_id

Notes:

  • UNION ALL keeps duplicates, UNION doesn't
  • Any ORDER BY goes at the end of the UNION
share|improve this answer

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