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I'm trying to loop through an array of values contained within an object which is itself contained in another object.

The object looks like this:

var guitar = {
  high4high5: {
    name: 'high 4th, high 5th',
    tuning: [ [5,4], [-2,3], [2,3], [7,3] ]
  },
  high4low5: {
    name: 'high 4th, low 5th',
    tuning: [ [5,4], [-2,3], [2,3], [7,2] ]
  }
}

I know I can just keep looping with a jQuery each loop like so:

$.each(guitar, function(key, value) {
  console.log('1st loop: ' + key, value);
  $.each(value, function(key, value) {
    console.log('2nd : ' + key, value);
    $.each(value, function(key, value) {
      console.log('3rd : ' + key, value);
    });
  });
});

But obviously this end up looping through everything again and again.

The data I need to get is the 'name' (string) and the 'tuning' (array) of each object.

I assume there's a better way to get what I want than just endless loops!

Probably important to note is that I won't know the name of the object inside the object ('high4high5' etc), but I WILL know that values within this object will always be name: (string) and tuning: (array).

EDIT:

Ok, I figured it out.

$.each(guitar, function(key, value) {
  var tuningName = value.name;
  var tuningArray = value.tuning;
  console.log('name: ' + tuningName);
  $.each(tuningArray, function(key,value) {
    console.log(value);
  });
});

Phew!

share|improve this question
    
If you figured it out, you should post it as an answer rather than editing it into the question. You can earn rep that way, and people are more likely to post other answers if they think that their approach is better. – karim79 Aug 29 '11 at 8:51
    
Thanks Karim79. Will do. – Richard Sweeney Aug 29 '11 at 9:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You really don't need jQuery to do this. You can do it with good old fashioned Javascript:

for(g in guitar) {
    console.log(guitar[g].name);
    console.log(guitar[g].tuning);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I just seriously dig the each method! Very versatile. Thanks anyhoo. – Richard Sweeney Aug 29 '11 at 8:50
    
To each his own. I just find this way cleaner for what you are doing, but do whatever works best for you if its working. – Corey Sunwold Aug 29 '11 at 8:52

I'll say here that I've managed to answer my own question using a jQuery each loop. It's definitely a more verbose way to do it!

$.each(guitar, function(key, value) {
  var tuningName = value.name;
  var tuningArray = value.tuning;
  console.log('name: ' + tuningName);
  $.each(tuningArray, function(key,value) {
    console.log(value);
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
why in the world would you do this instead of normal javascript? – Dhaivat Pandya Aug 30 '11 at 7:56
    
Can't say it's a better answer than Corey's (it's clearly not!), but I'm just learning to walk. – Richard Sweeney Aug 30 '11 at 8:23
    
okay. I thought it might be better it some way. – Dhaivat Pandya Aug 30 '11 at 8:26

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