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I have this type:

type Vector3<[<Measure>]'u> =
    struct
        val x:float32<'u>
        val y:float32<'u>
        val z:float32<'u>
    end

    new(x, y, z) = { x = x; y = y; z = z }

When I try to make a default instance, it gives me a strange error that I couldn't find any information on Google about:

Error 5 The default, zero-initializing constructor of a struct type may only be used if all the fields of the struct type admit default initialization

So okay, I can just use the default constructor to set everything to 0 with. Or not.

let f = Vector3(0.f<N>, 0.f<N>, 0.f<N>)

Gives me an error:

Error 1 This expression was expected to have type float32 but here has type float32

This only seems to happen when I use this instance in a subsequent calculation; otherwise, it correctly resolves the type of f as being Vector3<N>. Giving the constructor the type, as in Vector3<N>(...) seems to also solve the problem, which is really strange.

Is there something I'm doing wrong?

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2  
How did you define N? Because what you have above (setting everything to 0) works fine for me - or maybe the problem is in your subsequent calculation? –  David_001 Aug 29 '11 at 10:24
    
@David N is under Microsoft.FSharp.Math.SI, which I believe is in the PowerPack. The calculation works fine with a record format. –  Rei Miyasaka Aug 29 '11 at 10:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There must be something wrong elsewhere in your code. If you reset F# Interactive, open a new empty F# Script file and paste the following code (and then run it in FSI), then everything works just fine for me:

type Vector3<[<Measure>]'u> =
    struct
        val x:float32<'u>
        val y:float32<'u>
        val z:float32<'u>
    end
    new(x, y, z) = { x = x; y = y; z = z }

[<Measure>] type N    
let f = Vector3(0.f<N>, 0.f<N>, 0.f<N>) 

I would recommend writing the code using implicit constructor syntax which is more succinct and more idiomatic F# (the struct .. end declaration is still allowed, but it has been used mainly in old versions of F#). Default constructor doesn't seem to work in this scenario, but you can use static member:

[<Struct>]
type Vector3<[<Measure>]'u>(x:float32<'u>, y:float32<'u>, z:float32<'u>) =
    member this.X = x    
    member this.Y = y
    member this.Z = z
    static member Empty : Vector3<'u> = Vector3(0.f<_>, 0.f<_>, 0.f<_>)

[<Measure>] type N

let f1 = Vector3<N>.Empty
let f2 = Vector3(0.f<N>, 0.f<N>, 0.f<N>) 
f1.X + f2.X
share|improve this answer
1  
Could you expand on the performance discussion Tomas. I kinda stand on Ankur's side of the story. I'm pretty sure if the benchmark was run with 5-8 fields the structs approach would suffer. The point about the XBox/Compact GC holds if that is indeed the target platform. –  David Grenier Aug 29 '11 at 18:09
1  
@David - I didn't read the entire discussion under Ankur's answer. Performance always depends on the specific scenario - adding and removing the Struct attribute is the easiest way to find out :-). In general, structs are probably better for few fields if you need to create lots of them (especially if they are stored e.g. in an array). –  Tomas Petricek Aug 29 '11 at 20:33
2  
Regarding the link that Ankur posted (stack-allocation is an implemetnation detail) - if the type is immutable, then it doesn't matter whether it is allocated on the heap or the stack. This is great, because you can write your code and then add/remov Struct attribute and see what works better - it doesn't affect the behavior, just performance. Especially with arrays, it does matter though, because array of structs can be allocated as single continuous block of memory. –  Tomas Petricek Aug 29 '11 at 20:36
1  
@David The main rule is that if a struct ever needs to be boxed (i.e. cast to object), then it's converted to something that behaves like a class -- so it's in fact slower than a reference type. This doesn't happen as often anymore, as generics alleviate that need. Also, structs are said to perform best at under 32bytes -- but my experience has been that they can be quite a bit larger and still be faster than classes in the big picture even on PC, because they don't stress the garbage collector as much. –  Rei Miyasaka Aug 30 '11 at 1:23

You need to specify the Default Value attribute for val fields:

type Vector3<[<Measure>]'u> =
    struct
        [<DefaultValue(false)>] val mutable x:float32<'u>
        [<DefaultValue(false)>] val mutable y:float32<'u>
        [<DefaultValue(false)>] val mutable z:float32<'u>
    end
    member X.Init(x,y,z) = 
        X.x <- x
        X.y <- y
        X.z <- z

Or use record types:

type Vector3<[<Measure>]'u> = { x : float32<'u>; y : float32<'u> ; z : float32<'u> }
[<Measure>] type N
let v = { x = 10.0F<N>; y = 10.0F<N>; z = 10.0F<N> }

UPDATE:

type Vector3<[<Measure>]'u> =
    struct
        val x:float32<'u>
        val y:float32<'u>
        val z:float32<'u>
        new(X, Y, Z) = { x = X; y = Y; z = Z }
    end
share|improve this answer
    
Bleh, now it says "Extraneous fields have been given values" in the constructor. –  Rei Miyasaka Aug 29 '11 at 10:05
    
Updated my answer –  Ankur Aug 29 '11 at 10:20
    
But now it's mutable... hrm.... –  Rei Miyasaka Aug 29 '11 at 10:22
1  
@Ankur Conceptually, yeah, it's better to think of structs as being "pass-by-value" and classes as being "pass-by-reference", but when performance comes into question, the memory allocation details are rather important. –  Rei Miyasaka Aug 29 '11 at 10:44
1  
@Ankur I did -- with records, I can manage about 1,500,000 particles per second (each particle has a bunch of vector operations). With structs, I can get about 2,100,000. Also, the performance implications of using reference types as opposed to value types is a well-known issue. I don't think it's very subjective. –  Rei Miyasaka Aug 29 '11 at 10:47

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