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I have the name of the "sort by property" in a string. I will need to use Lambda/Linq to sort the list of objects.

Ex:

public class Employee
{
  public string FirstName {set; get;}
  public string LastName {set; get;}
  public DateTime DOB {set; get;}
}


public void Sort(ref List<Employee> list, string sortBy, string sortDirection)
{
  //Example data:
  //sortBy = "FirstName"
  //sortDirection = "ASC" or "DESC"

  var sort = list.

  if (sortBy == "FirstName")
  {
    list = list.OrderBy(x => x.FirstName).toList();    
  }

}
  1. Instead of using a bunch of ifs to check the fieldname (sortBy), is there a cleaner way of doing the sorting
  2. Is sort aware of datatype?
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2  
Dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/606997/… –  LeakyCode Apr 6 '09 at 19:50
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10 Answers

This can be done as

list.Sort( (emp1,emp2)=>emp1.FirstName.CompareTo(emp2.FirstName) );

The .NET framework is casting the lambda (emp1,emp2)=>int as a Comparer<Employee>.

This has the advantage of being strongly typed.

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2  
Exactly what I needed. Thank you! –  pbarranis Jan 16 '13 at 15:20
2  
+1, should be at the top of the list. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 29 '13 at 21:23
    
+1, someone should give you a silver dollar, kind sir. –  Pinch May 30 '13 at 14:38
3  
I am sorry but i dont see how this answers the question, since as mentioned by Quinn, the property is "in a string" i have the same situation but i ended up with a huge switch case to do the trick. –  Eduardo Dec 17 '13 at 18:26
2  
yeah i dont see it either something like this? list.Sort( (emp1,emp2)=>emp1.GetType().GetProperty(sortBy).GetValue(emp1,null).CompareTo(em‌​p2.GetType().GetProperty(sortBy).GetValue(emp2,null)) ); –  Sat Jan 2 at 7:38
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One thing you could do is change Sort so it makes better use of lambdas.

public enum SortDirection { Ascending, Descending }
public void Sort<TKey>(ref List<Employee> list,
                       Func<Employee, TKey> sorter, SortDirection direction)
{
  if (direction == SortDirection.Ascending)
    list = list.OrderBy(sorter);
  else
    list = list.OrderByDescending(sorter);
}

Now you can specify the field to sort when calling the Sort method.

Sort(ref employees, e => e.DOB, SortDirection.Descending);
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3  
Since the sort column is in a string you'd still need a switch/if-else blocks to determine which function to pass it. –  tvanfosson Apr 6 '09 at 19:49
    
You can't make that assumption. Who knows how his code calls it. –  Samuel Apr 6 '09 at 19:51
2  
He stated in the question that the "sort by property" is in a string. I'm just going by his question. –  tvanfosson Apr 6 '09 at 19:53
4  
I think it's more likely because it's coming from a sort control on a web page that passes the sort column back as a string parameter. That would be my use case, anyway. –  tvanfosson Apr 6 '09 at 20:31
1  
@tvanfosson - You are right, I have a custom control that has the order and the field name as a string –  DotnetDude Apr 6 '09 at 21:08
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You could use Reflection to get the value of the property.

list = list.OrderBy( x => TypeHelper.GetPropertyValue( x, sortBy ) )
           .ToList();

Where TypeHelper has a static method like:

public static class TypeHelper
{
    public static object GetPropertyValue( object obj, string name )
    {
        return obj == null ? null : obj.GetType()
                                       .GetProperty( name )
                                       .GetValue( obj, null );
    }
}

You might also want to look at Dynamic LINQ from the VS2008 Samples library. You could use the IEnumerable extension to cast the List as an IQueryable and then use the Dynamic link OrderBy extension.

 list = list.AsQueryable().OrderBy( sortBy + " " + sortDirection );
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1  
While this does solve his problem, we might want to steer him away from using a string to sort it. Good answer none-the-less. –  Samuel Apr 6 '09 at 19:49
    
You can use Dynamic linq without Linq to Sql to do what he needs...I love it –  JoshBerke Apr 6 '09 at 19:54
    
Sure. You can convert it to IQueryable. Didn't think about that. Updating my answer. –  tvanfosson Apr 6 '09 at 19:59
    
@Samuel If the sort is coming in as a route variable there is no other way to sort it. –  Alex Ford Feb 8 '12 at 17:14
    
@AlexFord Yes there is. If the sort is coming in as a route variable you will get it as a string. You can generate a lambda expression for the property using this string. –  Jerry Joseph May 16 '13 at 13:58
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Building the order by expression can be read here

Shamelessly stolen from the page in link:

// First we define the parameter that we are going to use
// in our OrderBy clause. This is the same as "(person =>"
// in the example above.
var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Person), "person");

// Now we'll make our lambda function that returns the
// "DateOfBirth" property by it's name.
var mySortExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<Person, object>>(Expression.Property(param, "DateOfBirth"), param);

// Now I can sort my people list.
Person[] sortedPeople = people.OrderBy(mySortExpression).ToArray();
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There are problems associated with this: DateTime sort. –  CrazyEnigma Jul 26 '10 at 16:46
    
Also how about composite classes, ie Person.Employer.CompanyName? –  davewilliams459 Oct 18 '11 at 14:21
    
I was essentially doing the same thing and this answer solved it. –  Jason.Net Mar 13 '12 at 16:22
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This is how I solved my problem:

List<User> list = GetAllUsers();  //Private Method

if (!sortAscending)
{
    list = list
           .OrderBy(r => r.GetType().GetProperty(sortBy).GetValue(r,null))
           .ToList();
}
else
{
    list = list
           .OrderByDescending(r => r.GetType().GetProperty(sortBy).GetValue(r,null))
           .ToList();
}
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You could use reflection to access the property.

public List<Employee> Sort(List<Employee> list, String sortBy, String sortDirection)
{
   PropertyInfo property = list.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0].
                                GetType().GetProperty(sortBy);

   if (sortDirection == "ASC")
   {
      return list.OrderBy(e => property.GetValue(e, null));
   }
   if (sortDirection == "DESC")
   {
      return list.OrderByDescending(e => property.GetValue(e, null));
   }
   else
   {
      throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
   }
}

Notes

  1. Why do you pass the list by reference?
  2. You should use a enum for the sort direction.
  3. You could get a much cleaner solution if you would pass a lambda expression specifying the property to sort by instead of the property name as a string.
  4. In my example list == null will cause a NullReferenceException, you should catch this case.
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Has anyone else ever noticed that this is a return type void but returns lists? –  emd Jun 14 '13 at 18:53
    
At least no one cared to fix it and I did not noticed it because I did not write the code using an IDE. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Daniel Brückner Jun 15 '13 at 1:43
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Sort uses the IComparable interface, if the type implements it. And you can avoid the ifs by implementing a custom IComparer:

class EmpComp : IComparer<Employee>
{
    string fieldName;
    public EmpComp(string fieldName)
    {
        this.fieldName = fieldName;
    }

    public int Compare(Employee x, Employee y)
    {
        // compare x.fieldName and y.fieldName
    }
}

and then

list.Sort(new EmpComp(sortBy));
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FYI: Sort is a method of List<T> and is not a Linq extension. –  Serguei Apr 6 '09 at 19:53
    
+1 for a clean answer. –  Byron Whitlock Nov 28 '11 at 17:55
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Answer for 1.:

You should be able to manually build an expression tree that can be passed into OrderBy using the name as a string. Or you could use reflection as suggested in another answer, which might be less work.

Edit: Here is a working example of building an expression tree manually. (Sorting on X.Value, when only knowing the name "Value" of the property). You could (should) build a generic method for doing it.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

class Program
{
    private static readonly Random rand = new Random();
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var randX = from n in Enumerable.Range(0, 100)
                    select new X { Value = rand.Next(1000) };

        ParameterExpression pe = Expression.Parameter(typeof(X), "value");
        var expression = Expression.Property(pe, "Value");
        var exp = Expression.Lambda<Func<X, int>>(expression, pe).Compile();

        foreach (var n in randX.OrderBy(exp))
            Console.WriteLine(n.Value);
    }

    public class X
    {
        public int Value { get; set; }
    }
}

Building an expression tree requires you to know the particpating types, however. That might or might not be a problem in your usage scenario. If you don't know what type you should be sorting on, it will propably be easier using reflection.

Answer for 2.:

Yes, since Comparer<T>.Default will be used for the comparison, if you do not explicitly define the comparer.

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Do you have an example of building an expression tree to be passed into OrderBy? –  DotnetDude Apr 6 '09 at 19:48
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The solution provided by Rashack does not work for reference types (int, enums, etc.) unfortunately.

For it to work with any type of property, this is the solution I found:

public static Expression<Func<T, object>> GetLambdaExpressionFor<T>(this string sortColumn)
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        var parameterExpression = Expression.Parameter(type, "x");
        var body = Expression.PropertyOrField(parameterExpression, sortColumn);
        var convertedBody = Expression.MakeUnary(ExpressionType.Convert, body, typeof(object));

        var expression = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, object>>(convertedBody, new[] { parameterExpression });

        return expression;
    }
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using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

public static class EnumerableHelper
{

    static MethodInfo orderBy = typeof(Enumerable).GetMethods(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public).Where(x => x.Name == "OrderBy" && x.GetParameters().Length == 2).First();

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, string propertyName)
    {
        var pi = typeof(TSource).GetProperty(propertyName, BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy | BindingFlags.Instance);
        var selectorParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "keySelector");
        var sourceParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(IEnumerable<TSource>), "source");
        return 
            Expression.Lambda<Func<IEnumerable<TSource>, IOrderedEnumerable<TSource>>>
            (
                Expression.Call
                (
                    orderBy.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(TSource), pi.PropertyType), 
                    sourceParam, 
                    Expression.Lambda
                    (
                        typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(typeof(TSource), pi.PropertyType), 
                        Expression.Property(selectorParam, pi), 
                        selectorParam
                    )
                ), 
                sourceParam
            )
            .Compile()(source);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, string propertyName, bool ascending)
    {
        return ascending ? source.OrderBy(propertyName) : source.OrderBy(propertyName).Reverse();
    }

}

Another one, this time for any IQueryable:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Reflection;

public static class IQueryableHelper
{

    static MethodInfo orderBy = typeof(Queryable).GetMethods(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public).Where(x => x.Name == "OrderBy" && x.GetParameters().Length == 2).First();
    static MethodInfo orderByDescending = typeof(Queryable).GetMethods(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public).Where(x => x.Name == "OrderByDescending" && x.GetParameters().Length == 2).First();

    public static IQueryable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, params string[] sortDescriptors)
    {
        return sortDescriptors.Length > 0 ? source.OrderBy(sortDescriptors, 0) : source;
    }

    static IQueryable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, string[] sortDescriptors, int index)
    {
        if (index < sortDescriptors.Length - 1) source = source.OrderBy(sortDescriptors, index + 1);
        string[] splitted = sortDescriptors[index].Split(' ');
        var pi = typeof(TSource).GetProperty(splitted[0], BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.IgnoreCase);
        var selectorParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "keySelector");
        return source.Provider.CreateQuery<TSource>(Expression.Call((splitted.Length > 1 && string.Compare(splitted[1], "desc", StringComparison.Ordinal) == 0 ? orderByDescending : orderBy).MakeGenericMethod(typeof(TSource), pi.PropertyType), source.Expression, Expression.Lambda(typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(typeof(TSource), pi.PropertyType), Expression.Property(selectorParam, pi), selectorParam)));
    }

}

You can pass multiple sort criteria, like this:

var q = dc.Felhasznalos.OrderBy(new string[] { "Email", "FelhasznaloID desc" });
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