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My application is working as client application for Bank server. Application is sending request and getting response from bank. This application is normally working fine, but sometimes

The I/O operation has been aborted because of either a thread exit or an application request

error with error code as 995 is coming.

public void OnDataReceived(IAsyncResult asyn)
{
    BLCommonFunctions.WriteLogger(0, "In :- OnDataReceived", 
                                        ref swReceivedLogWriter, strLogPath, 0);
    try
    {
        SocketPacket theSockId = (SocketPacket)asyn.AsyncState;

        int iRx = theSockId.thisSocket.EndReceive(asyn); //Here error is coming
        string strHEX = BLCommonFunctions.ByteArrToHex(theSockId.dataBuffer);                    

    }
}

Once this error start to come for all transactions after that same error begin to appear, so please help me to sort out this problem. If possible then with some sample code

Regards, Ashish Khandelwal

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There are few Windows errors that are as descriptive and reliable as that one. We can't help you find the thread that is terminating too early. Add some tracing to your code if you can't find it. –  Hans Passant Aug 29 '11 at 10:37

2 Answers 2

995 is an error reported by the IO Completion Port. The error comes since you try to continue read from the socket when it has most likely been closed.

Receiving 0 bytes from EndRecieve means that the socket has been closed, as does most exceptions that EndRecieve will throw.

You need to start dealing with those situations.

Never ever ignore exceptions, they are thrown for a reason.

Update

There is nothing that says that the server does anything wrong. A connection can be lost for a lot of reasons since as idle connection being closed by switch/router/firewall etc. Network failures to happen too.

What I'm saying is that you MUST handle disconnections. The proper way of doing so is to dispose the socket and try to connect a new one at certain intervals.

As for the receive callback a more proper way of handling it is something like this (semi pseudo code):

public void OnDataReceived(IAsyncResult asyn)
{
    BLCommonFunctions.WriteLogger(0, "In :- OnDataReceived", ref swReceivedLogWriter, strLogPath, 0);

    try
    {
        SocketPacket client = (SocketPacket)asyn.AsyncState;

        int bytesReceived = client.thisSocket.EndReceive(asyn); //Here error is coming
        if (bytesReceived == 0)
        {
          HandleDisconnect(client);
          return;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception err)
    {
       HandleDisconnect(client);
    }

    try
    {
        string strHEX = BLCommonFunctions.ByteArrToHex(theSockId.dataBuffer);                    

        //do your handling here
    }
    catch (Exception err)
    {
        // Your logic threw an exception. handle it accordinhly
    }

    try
    {
       client.thisSocket.BeginRecieve(.. all parameters ..);
    }
    catch (Exception err)
    {
       HandleDisconnect(client);
    }
}

the reason to why I'm using three catch blocks is simply because the logic for the middle one is different from the other two. Exceptions from BeginReceive/EndReceive usually indicates socket disconnection while exceptions from your logic should not stop the socket receiving.

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Dear jgauffin, Thanks for your response, but issue is that only client application is from our company and server is from some bank, so if socket closed from their side then how to express them that this problem is from their side also how can we handle this without exception i.e. as it throws exception in endreceive can we write any command which will tell us that receiving data is 0 –  Ashish Khandelwal Aug 30 '11 at 10:34
    
read my update. –  jgauffin Aug 30 '11 at 12:33
    
@AshishKhandelwal: did my answer help you? –  jgauffin May 3 '13 at 14:25

Put breakpoints on every line where you close the socket, or where the thread exits. If you have some universal silent try-catch block put a breakpoint there too (or better yet remove all silent try-catch blocks. They cause more problems than they solve).

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