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I have a WPF application like this.

namespace WpfApplication1
{
 /// <summary>
/// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
 /// </summary>
 public partial class MainWindow : Window
 {
public delegate void NextPrimeDelegate();
int i = 0;

public MainWindow()
{
  InitializeComponent();
}

 public void CheckNextNumber()
{
  i++;
  textBox1.Text= i.ToString();
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(
      System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.SystemIdle,
      new NextPrimeDelegate(this.CheckNextNumber));

 }

private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(
      DispatcherPriority.Normal,
      new NextPrimeDelegate(CheckNextNumber));
  }
 }

Above code is working without problem.My question is:I want to call more than a function that is called CheckNextNumber. For example:I have to make something like this.

tr[0].Start();
tr[0].Stop(); 
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For C# version prior to 3.0 you can use anonymous delegates:

 Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, (NextPrimeDelegate)delegate()
 { 
    tr[0].Start();
    tr[0].Stop(); 
 });

Beginning with C# 3.0 you can use lambdas (which is basically syntactic sugar on top of anonymous delegates). Additionally you don't need your NextPrimeDelegate because .NET 3.5 introduced the generic parameterless Action delegate.

 Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, new Action(() =>
 { 
    tr[0].Start();
    tr[0].Stop(); 
 });
share|improve this answer
    
@bitbonk-First of all,thanks for your interesting.I want to ask a question.How can I use parallel programming to call more than one function at a time by using Parallel Invoke?(for same application) –  Selo Aug 29 '11 at 16:02
1  
You should put that as a new separate question. –  bitbonk Aug 29 '11 at 20:04
    
OKAY,thanks again. –  Selo Aug 30 '11 at 8:17

Instead of using a delegate, you can use an Action with a codeblock with whatever code you like, e.g:

   Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(
      DispatcherPriority.Normal,
      new Action(() =>
      {
          tr[0].Start();
          tr[0].Stop();
      }));
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