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Several times I've been criticized for having suggested the use of the following methods:

  1. setPreferredSize
  2. setMinimumSize
  3. setMaximumSize

on Swing components. I don't see any alternative to their use when I want to define proportions between displayed components. I have been told this:

With layouts the answer is always the same: use a suitable LayoutManager

I have searched the web a little bit, but I haven't found any comprehensive analysis of the subject. So I have the following questions:

  1. Should I completely avoid the use of those methods?
  2. The methods have been defined for a reason. So when should I use them? In which context? For what purposes?
  3. What exactly are the negative consequences of using those methods? (I can only think adding portability between systems with different screen resolution).
  4. I don't think any LayoutManager can exactly satisfy all desired layout needs. Do I really need to implement a new LayoutManager for every little variation on my layout ?
  5. If the answer to 4 is "yes", won't this lead to a proliferation of LayoutManager classes which will become difficult to maintain?
  6. In a situation where I need to define proportions between children of a Component (eg, child1 should use 10% of space, child2 40% ,child3 50%), is it possible to achieve that without implementing a custom LayoutManager?

I hope to have been clear.

share|improve this question
8  
"I received a lot of critics" (polite cough) Did you not mean, 'one critic - a lot of times'? ;) –  Andrew Thompson Aug 30 '11 at 0:22
1  
@Andrew could well be :-) –  kleopatra Aug 30 '11 at 22:55
3  
@kleopatra Somebody has to maintain the standards. :) –  Andrew Thompson Aug 30 '11 at 22:58
    
@Roger: read carefully kleopatra's answer. I think I have no better words to explain it. –  Heisenbug May 10 '13 at 20:53
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7 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted
  1. Should I completely avoid the use of those methods?

    Yes for application code

  2. The methods have been defined for a reason. So when should I use them? In which context? For what purposes?

    I don't know, personally I think of it as an api design accident. Slightly forced by compound components having special ideas about child sizes. "Slightly", because they should have implemented their needs with a custom LayoutManager

  3. What exactly are the negative consequences of using those methods? (I can only think adding portability between systems with different screen resolution).

    Some (incomplete, and unfortunately the links are broken due to migration of SwingLabs to java.net) technical reasons are f.i. mentioned in the Rules (hehe) or in the link @bendicott found in his/her comment to my answer. Socially, posing tons of work onto your unfortunate fellow who has to maintain the code and has to track down a broken layout.

  4. I don't think any LayoutManager can exactly satisfy all desired layout needs. Do I really need to implement a new LayoutManager for every little variation on my layout ?

    Yes, there are LayoutManagers powerful enough to satisfy a very good approximation to "all layout needs". The big three are JGoodies FormLayout, MigLayout, DesignGridLayout. So no, in practice, you rarely write LayoutManagers except for simple highly specialized environments.

  5. If the answer to 4 is "yes", won't this lead to a proliferation of LayoutManager classes which will become difficult to maintain?

    -

  6. In a situation where I need to define proportions between children of a Component (eg, child1 should use 10% of space, child2 40% ,child3 50%), is it possible to achieve that without implementing a custom LayoutManager?

    Any of the Big-Three can, can't even GridBag (never bothered to really master, too much trouble for too little power.

share|improve this answer
4  
thank you very much :) . sorry for the insistence, but I think certain subject should be fully understood. –  Heisenbug Aug 29 '11 at 11:50
5  
the answer to 4 ("need to write loads of LayoutManagers") is no. So no need to answer 5 due to precondition ("if answer to 4 is yes") not met :-) –  kleopatra Aug 29 '11 at 12:14
2  
I'm not entirely sure I agree with this advice in at least two situations. 1) Custom rendered components 2) Using a JEditorPane with HTML that does not itself suggest a width. OTOH I am not sure if I've missed something. I'll carefully review the replies on the thread, but was interested if you had any comments, particularly on the latter case. –  Andrew Thompson Aug 30 '11 at 0:18
18  
Hope you don't mind, but I edited your answer to include the original questions. Makes life much easier as a passing reader. +1 –  Duncan Mar 21 '13 at 15:28
6  
Unsubstantiated. The poster doesn't cite a single reason. If your answers include "don't know", why bother posting at all. And this is an answer? Buark! –  TT. Jun 6 '13 at 12:26
show 10 more comments

A few heuristics:

  • Don't use set[Preferred|Maximum|Minimum]Size() when you really mean to override get[Preferred|Maximum|Minimum]Size(), as might be done in creating your own component, shown here.

  • Don't use set[Preferred|Maximum|Minimum]Size() when you could rely on a component's carefully overridden getPreferred|Maximum|Minimum]Size, as shown here and below.

  • Do use set[Preferred|Maximum|Minimum]Size() to derive post-validate() geometry, as shown below and here.

  • If a component has no preferred size, e.g. JDesktopPane, you may have to size the container, but any such choice is arbitrary. A comment may help clarify the intent.

  • Consider alternate or custom layouts when you find that you would have to loop through many components to obtain derived sizes, as mentioned in these comments.

enter image description here

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.KeyboardFocusManager;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeListener;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JDesktopPane;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JInternalFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
import javax.swing.JTextField;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

/**
 * @see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7229226
 * @see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7228843
 */
public class DesignTest {

    private List<JTextField> list = new ArrayList<JTextField>();
    private JPanel panel = new JPanel();
    private JScrollPane sp = new JScrollPane(panel);

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                DesignTest id = new DesignTest();
                id.create("My Project");
            }
        });
    }

    private void addField(String name) {
        JTextField jtf = new JTextField(16);
        panel.add(new JLabel(name, JLabel.LEFT));
        panel.add(jtf);
        list.add(jtf);
    }

    private void create(String strProjectName) {
        panel.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 1));
        addField("First Name:");
        addField("Last Name:");
        addField("Address:");
        addField("City:");
        addField("Zip Code:");
        addField("Phone:");
        addField("Email Id:");
        KeyboardFocusManager.getCurrentKeyboardFocusManager()
            .addPropertyChangeListener("permanentFocusOwner",
            new FocusDrivenScroller(panel));
        // Show half the fields
        sp.setVerticalScrollBarPolicy(JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS);
        sp.validate();
        Dimension d = sp.getPreferredSize();
        d.setSize(d.width, d.height / 2);
        sp.setPreferredSize(d);

        JInternalFrame internaFrame = new JInternalFrame();
        internaFrame.add(sp);
        internaFrame.pack();
        internaFrame.setVisible(true);

        JDesktopPane desktopPane = new JDesktopPane();
        desktopPane.add(internaFrame);

        JFrame frmtest = new JFrame();
        frmtest.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frmtest.add(desktopPane);
        frmtest.pack();
        // User's preference should be read from java.util.prefs.Preferences
        frmtest.setSize(400, 300);
        frmtest.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        frmtest.setVisible(true);
        list.get(0).requestFocusInWindow();
    }

    private static class FocusDrivenScroller implements PropertyChangeListener {

        private JComponent parent;

        public FocusDrivenScroller(JComponent parent) {
            this.parent = parent;
        }

        @Override
        public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {
            Component focused = (Component) evt.getNewValue();
            if (focused != null
                && SwingUtilities.isDescendingFrom(focused, parent)) {
                parent.scrollRectToVisible(focused.getBounds());
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
disagree (as you might have guessed :-) with reasoning by "external factors": the XXSize properties is meant to express internal only needs. Tweaking those from the outside is mis-using, aka hacking. If you want a (Internal- or J-) frame with a a specifc size relative to it's preferred ... size the frame, not the content –  kleopatra Aug 29 '11 at 12:07
1  
@kleopatra: just to be a little bit insistent: if setXXSize methods should never been used from outside, why haven't been declared private or protected? Isn't this a lack of design? Doesn't the public modifier implicitly tell the user that can use those methods? –  Heisenbug Aug 29 '11 at 12:12
1  
I have to agree with @kleopatra: setPreferredSize() always replaces the component's calculation with an arbitrary choice. –  trashgod Aug 29 '11 at 15:29
1  
@trashgod +100 to you I think there is no problem with overriding these methods, even calling them (but of course this would mean you have a custom component thus overriding would be better) –  David Kroukamp Oct 4 '12 at 12:43
5  
@DavidKroukamp: Thank you. I defer to kleopatra's greater experience, but I see the value in examining the contrary view critically. –  trashgod Oct 4 '12 at 15:42
show 4 more comments

Should I completely avoid the use of those methods?

No, there is no formal evidence to suggest calling or overriding these methods is not allowed. In fact Oracle says these methods are used for giving size hints: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/layout/using.html#sizealignment.

They may also be overriden (which is the best practice for Swing) when extending a Swing component (rather then calling the method on the custom component instance)

Most importatly no matter how you specify your component's size, be sure that your component's container uses a layout manager that respects the requested size of the component.

The methods have been defined for a reason. So when should I use them? In which context? For what purposes?

When you need to provide customized size hints to the containers Layout manager, so that the component will be laid out well

What exactly are the negative consequences of using those methods? (I can only think adding portability between systems with different screen resolution).

  • Many layout managers do not pay attention to a component's requested maximum size. However, BoxLayout and SpringLayout do. Furthermore, GroupLayout provides the ability to set the minimum, preferred or maximum size explicitly, without touching the component.

  • Make sure that you really need to set the component's exact size. Each Swing component has a different preferred size, depending on the font it uses and the look and feel. Thus having a set size might produce varied looks of the UI on different Systems

  • sometimes problems can be encountered with GridBagLayout and text fields, wherein if the size of the container is smaller than the preferred size, the minimum size gets used, which can cause text fields to shrink quite substantially.

  • JFrame does not enforce overriden getMinimumSize() only calling setMinimumSize(..) on its works

I don't think any LayoutManager can exactly satisfy all desired layout needs. Do I really need to implement a new LayoutManager for every little variation on my layout ?

If by implementing you mean using then yes. Not one LayoutManger can handle everything, each LayoutManager has its pros and cons thus each can be used together to produce the final layout.

Reference:

share|improve this answer
2  
provide customized size hints that's a contradiction in itself: providing sizing hints (in px!) is the exclusive task of the component. It calculates them based on internal state details that no other party except itself can know (nor can keep track of). From client perspective, the means of customization can be a suitable LayoutManager and/or specialize api on the component that allows configuring size requirements in terms of "semantic" size-relevant properties, f.i. number of rows/columns in a text component –  kleopatra Oct 1 '12 at 8:00
    
@kleopatra I would still love to know why Oracle then tells us how to use these methods and the correct way to use them. We might have our own preferences but we cant say the designers ment it to not be used when there is no evidence to suggest this. But thats why I put up the bounty see maybe if it would attract others that could give a information from a credible source where oracle states to not use these methods at all (thus making it bad practice if you do, for example setMinimumSize has to be called on things like JSplitPane etc this can be seen in the Oracle tutorial of split panes. –  David Kroukamp Oct 1 '12 at 8:06
3  
@David: I've come to see the setXxxSize methods as a red flag that I'm may wind up here, even when the docs suggest it. I almost always should have overridden getXxxSize, where one has access to the required geometry; and even short examples get recycled more than I want to think about. +1 for mentioning variation among layout managers and citing the tutorial. –  trashgod Oct 1 '12 at 20:58
    
D'oh, in my comment above, I meant to cite the answer here. –  trashgod Oct 4 '12 at 15:28
5  
+1 "No, there is no formal evidence to suggest calling or overriding these methods is not allowed." Spot on. The post tagged as answer is plain BS. –  TT. Jun 6 '13 at 12:31
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In a situation where I need to define proportions between children of a Component (child 1 should use 10% of space, child2 40% ,child3 50%), is it possible to achieve that without implementing a custom layout manager?

Maybe GridBagLayout would satisfy your needs. Besides that, there's a ton of layout managers on the web, and I bet there's one that fits your requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer. I have to assume that you meant also: "do not use setPreferredSize at all", right? –  Heisenbug Aug 29 '11 at 11:11
    
GridBagLayout uses constraints, where you can specify the "weight" both in X and Y for a given component, so the LayoutManager can decide what to do with the extra space on a resize. BUT you still need/can use setPreferredSize to determine the preferred size of each component, note that "preferred" doesn't mean it's going to be honored always. For special cases you may also need setMinimumSize and setMaximumSize anyway. They are not evil, don't buy into that. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/layout/gridbag.html –  マルちゃん だよ May 28 '13 at 3:41
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If you are having trouble with layouts in Java Swing, then I can highly recommend the JGoodies FormLayout provided freely as part of the Forms freeware library by Karsten Lentzsch here.

This very popular layout manager is extremely flexible, allowing for very polished Java UIs to be developed.

You'll find Karsten's documentation in this pdf, and some rather good documentation from google here.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the link. I dint' know that. I haven't so much trouble anyway, I just want to understand what exactly is wrong with setpreferredsize. +1 . –  Heisenbug Aug 29 '11 at 11:24
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These methods are poorly understood by most people. You should absolutely not ignore these methods. It is up to the layout manager if they honor these methods. This page has a table that shows which layout managers honor which of those methods:

http://thebadprogrammer.com/swing-layout-manager-sizing/

I have been writing Swing code for 8+ years and the layout managers included in the JDK have always served my needs. I have never needed a 3rd party layout manager to achieve my layouts.

I will say that you shouldn't try to give the layout manager hints with these methods until you are sure you need them. Do your layout without giving any sizing hints (i.e. let the layout manager do its job) and then you can make minor corrections if you need to.

share|improve this answer
    
either there's a slight misconception (on your part) or misunderstanding (on my part), take your choice :-) You keep repeating (here, in your blog, in your answer related to BoxLayout) the set XXSize as being important - actually the LayoutManager is (or not) interested in the XXSize, that is the sizing hint independent on how it came about (internal calculation by the component or manually forced by application code) –  kleopatra Jul 9 '13 at 16:48
    
I am not sure I understand what you are getting at here. I mention above that the XXSize() methods are just hints. I really see nothing wrong with giving a layout manager a little hint, if needed. In my swing code, you will find an occasional setXXSize() method. Not many, but every once in a while I find they are needed. JComboBox and JSpinner frequently need hints. Especially a JComboBox that is populated after it is realized. You seem to be against any and all usage of these methods and I don't know why. (maybe I am the one missing the boat on this I guess). –  Michael Jul 9 '13 at 22:07
2  
not the methods are the hints, the properties are: the components should report something reasonable for all hints, some (as f.i. JComboBox) don't - in returning maxInteger or so. That's a bug and should be fixed by the combo. As to your habit: be sure to be far away when the maintainer collegue has to clean that up :) Hard-coded hints tend to wreck the layout at the slightest change and are hard to detect as the reason for a broken layout. –  kleopatra Jul 10 '13 at 8:02
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There are a lot of good answers here but I want to add a little more about the reasons why you should normally avoid these (the question just came up again in a duplicate topic):

With few exceptions, if you are using these methods you are probably fine-tuning your GUI to look good on a specific look-and-feel (and with your system-specific settings, e.g. your preferred desktop font, etc.). The methods themselves aren't inherently evil, but the typical reasons for using them are. As soon as you start tuning pixel positions and sizes in a layout you run the risk of your GUI breaking (or at minimum, looking bad), on other platforms.

As an example of this, try changing your application's default look-and-feel. Even just with the options available on your platform, you may be surprised at how poorly the results can be rendered.

So, in the name of keeping your GUI functional and nice-looking on all platforms (remember, one of the major benefits of Java is its cross-platformness), you should rely on layout managers, etc., to automatically adjust the sizes of your components so that it renders correctly outside of your specific development environment.

All that said, you can certainly conceive of situations where these methods are justified. Again, they aren't inherently evil, but their usage is normally a big red flag indicating potential GUI issues. Just make sure you are aware of the high potential for complications if/when you use them, and always try and think if there is another look-and-feel-independent solution to your problems -- more often than not you will find that these methods are not necessary.

By the way, if you find yourself getting frustrated with standard layout managers, there are a lot of good free, open-source third-party ones, for example JGoodies' FormLayout, or MigLayout. Some GUI builders even have built-in support for third-party layout managers -- Eclipse's WindowBuilder GUI editor, for example, ships with support for FormLayout and MigLayout.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 a considerate answer - just disagree with they aren't inherently evil simply because they are :-) Typically, outside clients have no chance whatsoever to guess - and mere assumptions are as close as outsiders can get - halfway correct layout hints: only the components themselves do have all the info at all times to return anything useful. And since the moment outsiders interfere it's their responsiblity to keep those hints up-to-date which they can't. –  kleopatra Mar 10 at 22:15
    
Well, you know, I have a more "guns don't kill people, people kill people" kind of view of these sorts of things. :) If somebody uses these methods, they need to be aware of things like the good points you raise about unpredictable usage of layout hints (which is why situations where these methods are appropriate are rare indeed). –  Jason C Mar 10 at 22:22
    
agreed, but it helps if people don't have easy means to actually kill people - no guns, please :-) –  kleopatra Mar 10 at 22:25
    
By harnessing the power of bold text, I have increased the size of the mentioned red flag. –  Jason C Mar 10 at 22:27
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