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Let's suppose I've got a text with morphological tags, and a similar one with no tags at all. Both texts are merged in an interlinear fashion, one line below the other. Thus (additional carriage returns added for clarity's sake):

The(Art) day(N) started(V) well(Adv), windy(Adj) and(C) humid(Adj), here(Adv) in(P) London(PN),

The day was windy and quite humid here in London,

but(P) we(Pr) did(AuxV) not(Adv) mind(V), because(P) we(Pr) had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) indoors(Adv)

but no problem at all, mate! We had planned to stay at home anyway!

Second line (i.e., the untagged text) is always preceded by a space and a tab.

Besides, punctuation and case-sensitivity can be safely ignored. Additionally, it could be the case that some words in the first line are not tagged.

So, from this kind of pseudo-code, and given that my knowledge of Perl is somewhat limited, I decide to build a series of regexes to extract the tags (always in parentheses) on line 1 and insert them on line 2, provided the words are the same.

My current code looks like this:

use strict;
use warnings;

while ( <DATA> )
{
s/(^\w+)(\(\w+\))?(.+\r)(\s\t)(\1)/$1$2$3$4$5$2/g; #Tag 1st word on line 2 (if it's the same one as the 1st on line 1).
s/(^\w+)(\(\w+\))?\s(\w+)(\(\w+\))?(.+\r)(\s\t)(\1\2)\s(\3)/$1$2 $3$4$5$6$7 $8$4/g; #Tag 2nd word on line 2 (if it's the same one as the 2nd on line 1).
# And so on...

print;
}


__DATA__
The(Art) day(N) started(V) well(Adv), windy(Adj) and(C) humid(Adj), here(Adv) in(P) London(PN),
    The day was windy and quite humid here in London, 
but(P) we(Pr) did(AuxV) not(Adv) mind(V), because(P) we(Pr) had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) indoors(Adv) 
   but no problem at all, mate! We had planned to stay at home anyway! 

Obviously, the output I'm trying to get would look as follows:

The(Art) day(N) started(V) well(Adv), windy(Adj) and(C) humid(Adj), here(Adv) in(P) London(PN), The(Art) day(N) was windy and quite humid(Adj) here(Adv) in(P) London(PN),

but(P) we(Pr) did(AV) not(Adv) mind(V), because(P) we(Pr) had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) indoors(Adv)

but(P) no problem at all, mate! We(Pr) had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) at home anyway!


My problem is twofold:

a) The script above (where currently I'm trying to substitute just the first and second words), does not work, although I think the regexes are ok (I've tested them as Search/Replace in BBEdit).

b) I'm not at all sure this would be the right approach to tackle the task at hand (i.e., adding a whole series of increasingly longer and more complex regexes).

Could someone please tell me what I should do to get it to work, or, alternatively, show me a better way to optimize the task? I'm all ears!

Thank you very much indeed.

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1  
Nice question... I expect there are at least half a dozen ways to approach this one –  Zaid Aug 29 '11 at 11:48
1  
There is, of course, the added complexity of words with multiple meanings ('strike' could be a verb or a noun). –  Zaid Aug 29 '11 at 11:53
    
@Zaid: Thanks. Yes, I'm fully aware that complete automation is not possible. But what I'm after is a first stab that would make my life easier. –  RGP Aug 29 '11 at 11:58
    
If you want to take it to the next level you may be interested in Lingua::LinkParser. It is pretty old but the source could be an interesting read. –  matthias krull Aug 29 '11 at 14:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like this?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %tag;

while (<DATA>)
{
    if (m/\((Adj|Art|AuxV|C|N|PN|V)\)/) # it's an example
    {
        # Loop over tagged words; memorize tag for each
        while (m/(\w+)\((\w+)\)/g)
        {
            # If there were already some tags, add to existing
            $tag{$1} = (defined $tag{$1} ? "$tag{$1}|" : "") . $2;
        }
        print;
        next;
    }
    # else
    # Loop over all words; tag the ones we have a tag for
    s/(\w+)/defined $tag{$1} ? "$1($tag{$1})" : $1 /eg;
    print;

    # Flush tags for next iteration
    %tag = ();
}

Note the support for multiple example lines before the untagged line; and the support for multiple tags for a word.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a special reason to use next instead of the else keyword ? Performance ? –  fbdcw Aug 29 '11 at 13:45
    
@kowalski : No, there's no performance benefit to using next instead of else –  Zaid Aug 29 '11 at 15:57
    
I just use it as a readability aid, at the expense of some code duplication in some cases (there's the print in both branches). While reading code, I like to know that there is nothing after the else that I might need to pay attention to -- next plainly stops the iteration. –  tripleee Aug 29 '11 at 19:31
    
Thank you @tripleee for your suggestion. It makes sense and it is nicely commented, which is a plus for those of us who still have a lot to learn. –  RGP Aug 30 '11 at 17:15

Read first line, build a hash that maps the words with their corresponding tags. Read second line, word by word, insert matching tags from the hash.

Regex could be as simple as:

line =~ / ([A-z]+)\(([A-z]+)\)/
share|improve this answer

I would do something like:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;

my %tags;
while (my $line = <DATA> ) {
    chomp $line;
    if($line =~ /^\S/) {
        while ($line =~ /(\w+)\((\w+)\)/g) {
            $tags{$1} = $2;
        }
    } else {
        my $res = '';
        for (split/(\W)/,$line) {
            $res .= $_ . (exists($tags{$_}) ? '('.$tags{$_}.')' : '');
        }
        print $res,"\n";
    }
}


__DATA__
The(Art) day(N) started(V) well(Adv), windy(Adj) and(C) humid(Adj), here(Adv) in(P) London(PN),
    The day was windy and quite humid here in London, 
but(P) we(Pr) did(AuxV) not(Adv) mind(V), because(P) we(Pr) had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) indoors(Adv) 
   but no problem at all, mate! We had planned to stay at home anyway! 

output:

Notice it keeps the punctuation.

    The(Art) day(N) was windy(Adj) and(C) quite humid(Adj) here(Adv) in(P) London(PN), 
   but(P) no problem at all, mate! We had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) at home anyway! 
share|improve this answer
while ( <DATA> )
{
    if (m/\(/) {
        while (m/(\w+)(\(\w+\))/g) {
            $hash{$1}=$2;
        }
    }
    elsif (m/^\s+/) {
        push(@empty,$_)
    }
}

foreach (@empty) {
    s/[.,]/ /g;
    for (split(/\W/)) {
        printf("%s%s ", $_, $hash{$_});
    }
    print "\n";
}

outputs:

The(Art) day(N) was windy(Adj) and(C) quite humid(Adj) here(Adv) in(P) London(PN)  
but(P) no problem at all  mate! We had(AuxV) planned(V) to(P) stay(V) at home anyway! 
share|improve this answer

Well, here's another try. I don't use space and tab as delimiter, instead I test for odd and even lines. This also keeps punctuation.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use diagnostics;

my %words;

my $c = 0;
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    my @w = split(/\s+/, $line);
    foreach my $w (@w) {
        if (!($c % 2)) {
            $words{lc $1} = $2 if $w =~ /(\w+)\((\w+)\)/;
        } else {
            my $w2 = $w;
            $w2 =~ s/\W//g;
            if (exists $words{$w2}) {
                print $w, "($words{$w2}) ";
            } else {
                print "$w ";
            }
        }
    }
    $c++;
    print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

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