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I am back with a simple question (or related question).

The question is simple however I have not received an answer yet. I have asked many people with different experience in PHP. But the response I get is: "I don't have any idea. I've never thought about that." Using Google I have not been able to find any article on this. I hope that I will get a satisfying answer here.

So the question is:

What is the difference between $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] and $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] ?

Are there any advantages of one over the other?

Where should we use HTTP_HOST & where to use DOCUMENT_ROOT?

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5  
Did you try the documentation for $_SERVER? –  outis Aug 29 '11 at 12:04
    
I dont need to do that...I know what each thing means, but if one using document_root & other using http_host while defining paths, so wat will be the difference between the paths? Which is more used/reliable/where to use what?? as application runs using both. But still there should b sumthng that both are present. –  Aakash Sahai Aug 29 '11 at 12:57
2  
Your questions show you don't seem to know what each means. Each holds different information. You're asking for a comparison between apples and oranges. Would you ask "What's the difference between a street address and a phone number?", or where you would use each? –  outis Aug 29 '11 at 13:04
    
k i got u. but if these things are different then y it works similar for Case 1 : header('Location: '. $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/abc.php') Case 2: header('Location: '. $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . '/abc.php')....as u ol trying to say these are different, i know these are different by definition, but there r working same... –  Aakash Sahai Aug 29 '11 at 13:09
2  
No, no they don't. Neither should work in that context, as neither is a valid absolute URI. The document root is a local path and doesn't have any meaning in URIs. The latter is missing the URI scheme and '//'. –  outis Aug 29 '11 at 13:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

DOCUMENT_ROOT

The root directory of this site defined by the 'DocumentRoot' directive in the General Section or a section e.g.

DOCUMENT_ROOT=/var/www/example 

HTTP_HOST

The base URL of the host e.g.

HTTP_HOST=www.example.com 

The document root is the local path to your website, on your server; The http host is the hostname of the server. They are rather different; perhaps you can clarify your question?

Edit: You said:

Case 1 : header('Location: '. $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/abc.php')

Case 2: header('Location: '. $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . '/abc.php')

I suspect the first is only going to work if you run your browser on the same machine that's serving the pages.

Imagine if someone else visits your website, using their Windows machine. And your webserver tells them in the HTTP headers, "hey, actually, redirect this location: /var/www/example/abc.php." What do you expect the user's machine to do?

Now, if you're talking about something like

<?php include($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/include/abc.php') ?>

vs

<?php include($_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . '/include/abc.php') ?>

That might make sense. I suspect in this case the former is probably preferred, although I am not a PHP Guru.

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I think u all didn't get my point. I know what is document root and what http_host do...but i have used HTTP_HOST in all my project, but my senior said that u should use Document_root, it is more reliable. I asked him, so he told me search for it. Now I had only asked that y should I go for document root, instead of HTTP_HOST when defining path. –  Aakash Sahai Aug 29 '11 at 12:49
1  
LOL, former is not "probably preferred", but the only sensible method. HTTP_HOST should never be used for includes –  Your Common Sense Aug 29 '11 at 15:23

Eh, what's the question? DOCUMENT_ROOT contains the path to current web, in my case /home/www. HTTP_HOST contains testing.local, as it runs on local domain. The difference is obvious, isn't it?

I cannot figure out where you could interchange those two, so why should you consider advantages?

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I think u all didn't get my point. I know what is document root and what http_host do...but i have used HTTP_HOST in all my project, but my senior said that u should use Document_root, it is more reliable. I asked him, so he told me search for it. Now I had only asked that y should I go for document root, instead of HTTP_HOST when defining path. –  Aakash Sahai Aug 29 '11 at 12:50
2  
So tell your senior he is an idiot. –  Yossarian Sep 8 '11 at 15:01

HTTP_HOST will give you URL of the host, e.g. domain.com

DOCUMENT_ROOT will give you absolute path to document root of the website in server's file system, e.g. /var/www/domain/

Btw, have you tried looking at PHP's manual, specifically $_SERVER? Everything is explanied there.

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HTTP_HOST isn't a URL, it's just a (wait for it) host name. There's no 'http:' scheme. –  outis Aug 29 '11 at 12:09
    
@outis right, thank you, amended –  J0HN Aug 29 '11 at 12:10
    
I think u all didn't get my point. I know what is document root and what http_host do...but i have used HTTP_HOST in all my project, but my senior said that u should use Document_root, it is more reliable. I asked him, so he told me search for it. Now I had only asked that y should I go for document root, instead of HTTP_HOST when defining path. –  Aakash Sahai Aug 29 '11 at 12:51
1  
This means that you or your senior does not understand what's the difference between them. Could you provide some code samples where you use HTTP_HOST? –  J0HN Aug 29 '11 at 12:53
    
Case 1 : header('Location: '. $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/abc.php') Case 2: header('Location: '. $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . '/abc.php') –  Aakash Sahai Aug 29 '11 at 13:01
header('Location: '. $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/abc.php')

should be used for including the files in another file.

<?php include($_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . '/include/abc.php') ?>

should be used for hyperlinking

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