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Is this C code:

/* LERP(a,b,c) = linear interpolation macro, is 'a' when c == 0.0 and 'b' when c == 1.0 */
#define LERP(a,b,c)     (((b) - (a)) * (c) + (a))

http://www.brucelindbloom.com/index.html?Eqn_XYZ_to_T.html

Equals this C# code?

private static double LERP(double a, double b, double c) { return (((b) - (a)) * (c) + (a)); }

?

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2  
A bit too heavy on parenthesis there, but looks legit. –  Gleno Aug 29 '11 at 12:11
2  
@bobobobo: What if an answer appears that you with your godlike opinion do not consider "nonsense", but your "nonsense-comment" is still there? Will you check this question's thread daily? This alone is enough proof to me that your opinion is nonsense as for your non-defensive style of speaking, which prolly also reflects your style of programming. This holds doubly true with the fact that you don't know and/or respect the common justification for downvoting here on StackOverflow. Please never work in my company. At least not in IT. –  phresnel Aug 29 '11 at 14:00
    
Fine. Your answer is good, but the ones mentioning only the ++ corner case or the fact this would require conversion from integral types are not very useful. –  bobobobo Aug 29 '11 at 18:41
    
@bobobobo: The increment operators are well defined for floating types, too. –  phresnel Aug 31 '11 at 9:09
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6 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

no. consider the following:

LERP(x++,1,2);

The c code might also have a side effect of increasing x twice [it is undefined as mentioned by @phresnel], while the c# code is perfectly defined, and will increase x only once.

the result also might be different, since the first a and the second one [in the macro] might have a different value, since it might have increased in the first one.

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8  
+1, I.e. why one shouldn't use macros in the first place. But wanna bet a million bucks that the OP doesn't care about the corner case? :) –  Gleno Aug 29 '11 at 12:15
    
@Gleno: it smells like a homework question which is exactly looking for this corner case... anyway, one should also consider this thing –  amit Aug 29 '11 at 12:17
    
@amit Thx, didn't notice the corner case. anyway to fix it ? –  Danpe Aug 29 '11 at 12:22
    
@Danpe: use a function instead of the macro :) –  amit Aug 29 '11 at 12:23
4  
@bobobobo: the OP asks if the 2 code samples are EQUAL, definition of equal: same behavior for all input cases. My answer aims to show an example where the behavior is different for the same input, and thus the 'functions' are not equal. –  amit Aug 29 '11 at 13:52
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No. The C variant comes with all the deficiencies of #define-macros. Reminder:

#define LERP(a,b,c)     (((b) - (a)) * (c) + (a))


Potential Waste of Performance

Imagine a pure function call in an invokation of the #define-macro:

int fac (int x) {
    return x<=1 ? 1 : x*fac(x-1);
}

int main () {
    std::cout << LERP(fac(5), fac(2), 0);
}

That line expands to:

    std::cout << (((fac(2)) - (fac(5))) * (0) + (fac(5)))

Now you have potentially doubled the runtime for two invokations of your faculty function that was perviously just one.

This surely gets worse if you nest your lerping, as is for instance common in some graphics programming situations:

int main () {
    std::cout << LERP(
                     LERP(fac(5), fac(2), 0),
                     LERP(fac(5), fac(2), 0),
                     0
                 );
}

Expanding to:

int main () {
    std::cout << LERP(
                     (((fac(2)) - (fac(5))) * (0) + (fac(5))),
                     (((fac(2)) - (fac(5))) * (0) + (fac(5)))
                     0
                 );
}

Expanding to (formatting tweaked for readability):

int main () {
    std::cout << (  (((((fac(2)) - (fac(5))) * (0) + (fac(5))))
                  - ((((fac(2)) - (fac(5))) * (0) + (fac(5)))))
                  * (c)
                 + ((((fac(2)) - (fac(5))) * (0) + (fac(5)))))
}

Whereas the clean version does computationally not more than:

float a = LERP(fac(5), fac(2), 0);
float b = LERP(fac(5), fac(2), 0);
float c = LERP(a,b,0);

or

float fac_a = fac(5),
      fac_b = fac(2);
float a = (fac_b-fac_a)*0 + fac_a;
float fac_c = fac(5),
      fac_d = fac(2);
float a = (fac_d-fac_c)*0 + fac_c;

So in a two dimensional setup

  1. Proper version:
    1. 4 calls to fac()
    2. 4 additions
    3. 2 multiplications
  2. ´#define` version:
    1. 9 calls to fac()
    2. 8 additions
    3. 4 multiplications

It gets exponentially worse with every dimension you'd add. Even five-dimensional Perlin Noise is sometimes seen (3d volume + time + continous seed), for which some expressions are evaluated freaking 31 times, instead of just once!:

LERP( LERP(LERP(LERP(LERP(probe(),1,2), LERP(3,4,5), 6),
                LERP(LERP(7,8,9), LERP(10,11,12), 13),
                14),
           LERP(LERP(LERP(90,91,92), LERP(93,94,95), 96),
                LERP(LERP(97,98,99), LERP(910,911,912), 913),
                914),
           1014),
      LERP(LERP(LERP(LERP(0,1,2), LERP(3,4,5), 6),
                LERP(LERP(7,8,9), LERP(10,11,12), 13),
                14),
          LERP(LERP(LERP(90,91,92), LERP(93,94,95), 96),
               LERP(LERP(97,98,99), LERP(910,911,912), 913),
               914),
          1014),
      666)

You can also see the preprocessed code by invoking cpp (note the single appearance of probe() before).

foo@bar:~/ cpp heavy.cc

[snip] (((((((((((((((911) - (910)) * (912) + (910))) - ((((98) - (97)) * (99) + (97)))) * (913) + ((((98) - (97)) * (99) + (97))))) - (((((((94) - (93)) * (95) + (93))) - ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))) * (96) + ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))))) * (914) + (((((((94) - (93)) * (95) + (93))) - ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))) * (96) + ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90))))))) - ((((((((((11) - (10)) * (12) + (10))) - ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7)))) * (13) + ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7))))) - (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))) * (6) + ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))))) * (14) + (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))) * (6) + ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))))))) * (1014) + ((((((((((11) - (10)) * (12) + (10))) - ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7)))) * (13) + ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7))))) - (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))) * (6) + ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))))) * (14) + (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0)))) * (6) + ((((1) - (0)) * (2) + (0))))))))) - (((((((((((((911) - (910)) * (912) + (910))) - ((((98) - (97)) * (99) + (97)))) * (913) + ((((98) - (97)) * (99) + (97))))) - (((((((94) - (93)) * (95) + (93))) - ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))) * (96) + ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))))) * (914) + (((((((94) - (93)) * (95) + (93))) - ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))) * (96) + ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90))))))) - ((((((((((11) - (10)) * (12) + (10))) - ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7)))) * (13) + ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7))))) - (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))) * (14) + (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))))) * (1014) + ((((((((((11) - (10)) * (12) + (10))) - ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7)))) * (13) + ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7))))) - (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))) * (14) + (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))))))) * (666) + (((((((((((((911) - (910)) * (912) + (910))) - ((((98) - (97)) * (99) + (97)))) * (913) + ((((98) - (97)) * (99) + (97))))) - (((((((94) - (93)) * (95) + (93))) - ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))) * (96) + ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))))) * (914) + (((((((94) - (93)) * (95) + (93))) - ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90)))) * (96) + ((((91) - (90)) * (92) + (90))))))) - ((((((((((11) - (10)) * (12) + (10))) - ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7)))) * (13) + ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7))))) - (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))) * (14) + (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))))) * (1014) + ((((((((((11) - (10)) * (12) + (10))) - ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7)))) * (13) + ((((8) - (7)) * (9) + (7))))) - (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))))) * (14) + (((((((4) - (3)) * (5) + (3))) - ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe())))) * (6) + ((((1) - (probe())) * (2) + (probe()))))))))))

Again, full source is here.


Potential Undefined Behaviour

You can put evil stuff into it:

LERP(++a,b,c)

which expands to

(((b) - (++a)) * (c) + (++a))

which is undefined behaviour in C¹ (and in C++, btw). a might be increased twice, or it might be increased once, or an exception might be thrown that says Debug-Runtime-Exception: Invoked Undefined Behaviour, or the compiler is smart enough to reject that code, or whatever.

The undefined behaviour comes from the fact that the C99-standard (and C++2003, too) does not allow a value to be modified multiple times before reaching the next Sequence Point.


ID pollution and infection

(This is more relevant if you'd convert the C# into the macro variant.)

The #define-macro-name pollutes and infects the whole unit of translation from the point of definition to either the end-of-unit or its undefinition.

foo@bar:~/ cat main.cc
// Orbiter Physics Sim
#include "lerp.h"

int main () {
    const int LERP = 2; // Linear Extrasolar Resonance Potential.
}

foo@bar:~/ g++ main.cc
main.cc:5:15: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘=’ token

More ...

  • Macros are generic, but not typesafe. The macro-writer has no (clean) opportunity to put constraints on the types for which that macro should be valid.
  • Macros don't have scope, though this is already implied by the last section

¹: C99 (ISO/IEC 9899:TC2), J.2, "Undefined Behaviour": Between two sequence points, an object is modified more than once, or is modified and the prior value is read other than to determine the value to be stored (6.5).

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1  
I think the issue you are pointing at applies only to c++, isn't it perfectly defined in c? [the question is labled as 'c', not 'c++'] –  amit Aug 29 '11 at 12:48
1  
Also applies to C99. See section J2, a summary of "Undefined behaviour": Between two sequence points, an object is modified more than once, or is modified and the prior value is read other than to determine the value to be stored (6.5). –  phresnel Aug 29 '11 at 13:08
    
interesting. thanks for pointing that out. +1 –  amit Aug 29 '11 at 13:10
    
I edited my answer to reflect that, thx for point out my C/C++ confusion :) –  phresnel Aug 29 '11 at 13:29
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Technically, no they are not equal. The C macro can take any type: int, float, byte, etc.

Your C# version can only handle double, without explicit casts. You'd need to add overloads as needed for other types.

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LERP is very nearly useless on an integral type –  bobobobo Aug 29 '11 at 13:43
    
@bobobobo: So? It still can take any type for which those operators are defined. Apart, only this incarnation of linear interpolation is useless. But generally, lerping integers is perfectly valid. You just need some divisions or bitshifts. I've done so in metatrace, for example, a compile time ray tracer based on fixed point math (and integers can be considered a subset of fixed point numbers). –  phresnel Aug 29 '11 at 13:54
    
@bobobobo: Question: If you were the one to downvote this correct answer, then you must be really inexperienced w.r.t. programming and the stack overflow community. –  phresnel Aug 29 '11 at 13:56
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It's basically equivalent, yes. You can also get rid of some parentheses:

private static double LERP(double a, double b, double c) { return (b - a) * c + a; }
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1  
It is not basically equivalent. Macros are not type-safe. –  user195488 Aug 29 '11 at 12:16
    
I interpreted the question as "if I rewrite it this way, does it do the same calculation?". –  Andrea Bergia Aug 29 '11 at 12:25
    
I'm sorry, but that's not how it is written. –  user195488 Aug 29 '11 at 12:25
1  
Sometimes we just have to read minds and answer the question that should have been asked. OP needs a function in C# that is equivalent to macro in C, and this is that equivalent function. –  Dialecticus Aug 29 '11 at 12:30
    
@Dialecticus: I understand what you are saying, but an equivalent set of functions would have all the overloads. Macros take in anything. Also, this is not equivalent because there is a side-effect with macros as shown in the current highest upvoted answer. –  user195488 Aug 29 '11 at 12:38
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To get what you had in C you may use:

delegate double ValueGetter();
static double LERP(ValueGetter a, ValueGetter b, ValueGetter c) { return (b() - a()) * c() + a(); }

But I agree with amit. This might be the same you had in C (but solely for double not for other types) still it might not be what you really want.. (with delegate you could set 'i++' as a, not only result of i++)

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nice workaround. +1 –  amit Aug 29 '11 at 13:16
    
.____Awful____. –  bobobobo Aug 29 '11 at 13:41
    
But still, the result of the C version LERP(i++,... is simply not defined, so an exact duplicate can't be possible with regards to multiple assignments. –  phresnel Aug 29 '11 at 13:51
1  
That's true. My example is not even generic. But even if it was it wouldn't cover all possibilities of macros. –  rudolf_franek Aug 29 '11 at 14:02
2  
Macros are the devil :) –  phresnel Aug 30 '11 at 6:57
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Yes, but you can write it more simple:

return (b - a) * c + a; 
share|improve this answer
    
-1: actually they are not equal, as the other answers point out (which comes from deficiencies of #define-macros) –  phresnel Aug 30 '11 at 6:56
    
@phresnel - this C# code works like correctly used macro, and gives compilation error, when used incorrectly. Is it OK for you? With 40% of negative votes you are close to have the Troll badge. –  Alex Farber Aug 30 '11 at 10:00
    
the question was whether they are equivalent, and I am afraid they are not. What is "correctly used"? For example: centers[x] = lerp(++minsIter, ++maxsIter, 0.5);, that does not even look foul to me. And it's a possible use for the C# version, but not for the C-Macro version. Troll badge: You are right, I must up-vote more. –  phresnel Aug 31 '11 at 9:24
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