Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Someone knows an algorithm that gets temperatue in Kelvin/Celsius and returns RGB?

Like in thermal cameras.

I found some links :

http://www.brucelindbloom.com/index.html?Eqn_XYZ_to_T.html

http://www.fourmilab.ch/documents/specrend/specrend.c

enter image description here

But i cant figure what XYZ color is ?

enter image description here

I only have temperature in Celsius..

i can convert it to any temperature Temperature Conversion Formulas

UPDATE: Blackbody Color Datafile I have found this.. but those Kelvin degrees are impossible.. i mean red suppose to be hot.. so why 8000k is blue and 1000k is red...

share|improve this question
6  
The second link contains a complete implementation. Reading the code should be all that's necessary. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 29 '11 at 12:16
2  
Please forgive my ignorance: But isn't temperature a single value which can be mapped directly to a single point on a simple pre-defined gradient? –  Bobby Aug 29 '11 at 12:38
    
@Bobby thats exectly what i'm trying to do.. But where can i get ot how can i make a pre-defined gradient ? –  Danpe Aug 29 '11 at 13:13
1  
8000K -> blue and 1000K -> red are color temperatures. And blue is indeed higher energy than red. –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 29 '11 at 13:44
1  
I think it may be worth pointing out that the colors shown by thermal cameras are not in fact "real colors". They are are chosen somewhat arbitrarily and are only intended to visualize, not measure. –  carlpett Aug 29 '11 at 13:52
add comment

4 Answers

If get you right you are looking for a theoretical background on XYZ color space

share|improve this answer
add comment

Color temperature is based on the actual color of light emitted from something (theoretically, an "ideal black body") that emits light based solely on its temperature.

Some examples of this kind of light source: if you have an electric stove element that is glowing red, it might be around 1000K. A regular incandescent bulb filament is around 2700K, and the sun is roughly 5700K. All three are fair approximations of a "black body"; they emit a particular spectrum of light based on their actual temperature.

Many artificial light sources are not actually the "temperature" of the light they emit (and their spectra are generally not black-body spectra, either...). Instead, their "temperature" rating is the temperature a theoretical black body would have to be in order to emit light of that color. There are also colors that cannot be generated by a black body: light which is greenish or purplish compared to a more "natural"-looking black body illumination.

As mentioned in one of the comments, the kind of thermal camera displays you are probably thinking about are all false-color. In a false-color display, the colors are chosen for convenience only: so, for a thermal camera they might choose a "hot"-looking red for warm, and "cold"-looking blue for cold. But, they could just as easily choose a range from black to white, or fuschia to green.

Because false-color displays are arbitrary, you really need to check the color key to a particular image or system if you want to estimate the temperature (scientific images should generally have some kind of color key for this purpose). If you have no color key, and no documentation on how the image was generated, you are out of luck.

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best option is to use an image with GetPixel:

Temperature Gradient

private void UpdateTemp()
{
    Bitmap temps = (Bitmap)Properties.Resources.temp;
    if (curTemp >= 0)
    {
        int i = curTemp;
        if (i < 0)
            i = 0;
        if (i > temps.Width-1)
            i = temps.Width-1;
        this.BackColor = temps.GetPixel(i, 10);
    }
}

Or building an array. Source

    private static Color[] colors = 
    {
        Color.FromArgb(155, 188, 255), //    40000
        Color.FromArgb(155, 188, 255), //    39500
        Color.FromArgb(155, 188, 255), //    39000
        Color.FromArgb(155, 188, 255), //    38500
        Color.FromArgb(156, 188, 255), //    38000
        Color.FromArgb(156, 188, 255), //    37500
        Color.FromArgb(156, 189, 255), //    37000
        Color.FromArgb(156, 189, 255), //    36500
        Color.FromArgb(156, 189, 255), //    36000
        Color.FromArgb(157, 189, 255), //    35500
        Color.FromArgb(157, 189, 255), //    35000
        Color.FromArgb(157, 189, 255), //    34500
        Color.FromArgb(157, 189, 255), //    34000
        Color.FromArgb(157, 189, 255), //    33500
        Color.FromArgb(158, 190, 255), //    33000
        Color.FromArgb(158, 190, 255), //    32500
        Color.FromArgb(158, 190, 255), //    32000
        Color.FromArgb(158, 190, 255), //    31500
        Color.FromArgb(159, 190, 255), //    31000
        Color.FromArgb(159, 190, 255), //    30500
        Color.FromArgb(159, 191, 255), //    30000
        Color.FromArgb(159, 191, 255), //    29500
        Color.FromArgb(160, 191, 255), //    29000
        Color.FromArgb(160, 191, 255), //    28500
        Color.FromArgb(160, 191, 255), //    28000
        Color.FromArgb(161, 192, 255), //    27500
        Color.FromArgb(161, 192, 255), //    27000
        Color.FromArgb(161, 192, 255), //    26500
        Color.FromArgb(162, 192, 255), //    26000
        Color.FromArgb(162, 193, 255), //    25500
        Color.FromArgb(163, 193, 255), //    25000
        Color.FromArgb(163, 193, 255), //    24500
        Color.FromArgb(163, 194, 255), //    24000
        Color.FromArgb(164, 194, 255), //    23500
        Color.FromArgb(164, 194, 255), //    23000
        Color.FromArgb(165, 195, 255), //    22500
        Color.FromArgb(166, 195, 255), //    22000
        Color.FromArgb(166, 195, 255), //    21500
        Color.FromArgb(167, 196, 255), //    21000
        Color.FromArgb(168, 196, 255), //    20500
        Color.FromArgb(168, 197, 255), //    20000
        Color.FromArgb(169, 197, 255), //    19500
        Color.FromArgb(170, 198, 255), //    19000
        Color.FromArgb(171, 198, 255), //    18500
        Color.FromArgb(172, 199, 255), //    18000
        Color.FromArgb(173, 200, 255), //    17500
        Color.FromArgb(174, 200, 255), //    17000
        Color.FromArgb(175, 201, 255), //    16500
        Color.FromArgb(176, 202, 255), //    16000
        Color.FromArgb(177, 203, 255), //    15500
        Color.FromArgb(179, 204, 255), //    15000
        Color.FromArgb(180, 205, 255), //    14500
        Color.FromArgb(182, 206, 255), //    14000
        Color.FromArgb(184, 207, 255), //    13500
        Color.FromArgb(186, 208, 255), //    13000
        Color.FromArgb(188, 210, 255), //    12500
        Color.FromArgb(191, 211, 255), //    12000
        Color.FromArgb(193, 213, 255), //    11500
        Color.FromArgb(196, 215, 255), //    11000
        Color.FromArgb(200, 217, 255), //    10500  
        Color.FromArgb(204, 219, 255), //    10000
        Color.FromArgb(208, 222, 255), //    9500
        Color.FromArgb(214, 225, 255), //    9000
        Color.FromArgb(220, 229, 255), //    8500
        Color.FromArgb(227, 233, 255), //    8000
        Color.FromArgb(235, 238, 255), //    7500
        Color.FromArgb(245, 243, 255), //    7000
        Color.FromArgb(255, 249, 253), //    6500
        Color.FromArgb(255, 243, 239), //    6000
        Color.FromArgb(255, 236, 224), //    5500
        Color.FromArgb(255, 228, 206), //    5000
        Color.FromArgb(255, 219, 186), //    4500
        Color.FromArgb(255, 209, 163), //    4000
        Color.FromArgb(255, 196, 137), //    3500
        Color.FromArgb(255, 180, 107), //    3000
        Color.FromArgb(255, 161,  72), //    2500
        Color.FromArgb(255, 137,  18), //    2000
        Color.FromArgb(255, 109,   0), //    1500 
        Color.FromArgb(255,  51,   0), //    1000
    };
share|improve this answer
add comment

I realize this is a two-year old thread, but I had the same predicament.

I took the data from the color table and did applied piece-wise 5th order polynomial fitting using Numpy.polyfit in Python. From those coefficients I was able to come up with the C# function below. R-squared values for the fits are close to or exceed 0.999. It has less than .01% error through most of its domain, but it does have a couple of points where it is closer to 3%. Should be good enough for most situations though.

private Color blackBodyColor(double temp)
{
    float x = (float)(temp / 1000.0);
    float x2 = x * x;
    float x3 = x2 * x;
    float x4 = x3 * x;
    float x5 = x4 * x;

    float R, G, B = 0f;

    // red
    if (temp <= 6600)
        R = 1f;
    else
        R = 0.0002889f * x5 - 0.01258f * x4 + 0.2148f * x3 - 1.776f * x2 + 6.907f * x - 8.723f;

    // green
    if (temp <= 6600)
        G = -4.593e-05f * x5 + 0.001424f * x4 - 0.01489f * x3 + 0.0498f * x2 + 0.1669f * x - 0.1653f;
    else
        G = -1.308e-07f * x5 + 1.745e-05f * x4 - 0.0009116f * x3 + 0.02348f * x2 - 0.3048f * x + 2.159f;

    // blue
    if (temp <= 2000f)
        B = 0f;
    else if (temp < 6600f)
        B = 1.764e-05f * x5 + 0.0003575f * x4 - 0.01554f * x3 + 0.1549f * x2 - 0.3682f * x + 0.2386f;
    else
        B = 1f;

    return Color.FromScRgb(1f, R, G, B);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.