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I am trying to make a bash script which will tar all folders individually recursively.

However, I have a problem because some folder names have spaces, etc. So it does not work correctly.

What I have:

#!/bin/bash
SAVEIFS=$IFS
IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b")
for i in $(ls ./2011)
do
    tar -zcvf "$i".tar.gz "$i"
done
IFS=$SAVEIFS

However problems arise for example:

tar -zcvf St Patricks Day Bar Night.tar.gz St Patricks Day Bar Night

The spaces cause problems, what's a good way around this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
ls ./2011 | while read i
do
    echo tar -zcvf "$i.tar.gz" "$i"
done
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Thanks, this works. Care to explain why the loop has to be in that format? –  Neutralise Aug 29 '11 at 12:34
    
for ... in always splits things at spaces, and you can't get around that (not even with IFS). But read splits things at the \n character, which works almost perfectly (unless you really do have \n in your filenames, in which case you probably deserve no pity). –  Kilian Foth Aug 29 '11 at 13:35

Use double quotes around the file name and bash filename expansion instead of ls.

#!/bin/bash
for i in ./*
do
    echo tar -zcvf "$i.tar.gz" "$i"
done
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+1 this method is more reliable than read -- it doesn't get confused by linefeeds in the name, spaces at beginning/end of name, etc. –  Gordon Davisson Aug 29 '11 at 15:17

What against

#!/bin/bash
ls ./2011 | while read i; do
do
    printf "%s***" tar -zcvf "$i.tar.gz" "$i"
done

? Be aware that the printf stuff serves to see the boundaries between arguments.

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The problem is not with your script (although there might be problems with that too -- if nothing else, it is two magnitudes more complex than it needs to be). The problem is that you need to quote the file name with spaces when you invoke the script.

yourscript "St. Patrick's Day Bar Night"

For what it's worth, the ls in backticks is superfluous; just do for i in ./2011/* instead. As far as I can tell, the fidgeting with IFS is merely unnecessary, but it might also be causing problems.

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