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I am reading on tail recursion as below

Tail recursion refers to a recursive call at the last line. Tail recursion can be mechanically eliminated by enclosing the body in a while loop and replacing the recursive call with one assignment per function argument.

For example

void print(Iterator start, Iterator end, ostream& out=cout) {
  if(start == end)
      return;
  out << *start++ << endl;
  print(start, end, out);
}

is converted to iterative by above specification as

void print(Iterator start, Iterator end, ostream& out=cout) {
   while(true) {
      if(start == end)
          return;
      out << *start++ << endl;
    }
}

In above passage it is mentioned that "replacing recursive call with one assignment per function argument, but in given example we didn't have any assignment?

Can any one explain and provide example for above explanation about how to translate recursive to iterative function?

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I think they were speaking imprecisely and that what they really meant was that you could do some operation once per loop instead of once per function call. In this case the output statement (out <<) –  mydogisbox Aug 29 '11 at 13:05
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The general conversion of recursive to iterative would look like this.

Original code:

void print(Iterator start, Iterator end, ostream& out=cout) {
  if(start == end)
      return;
  out << *start++ << endl;
  print(start, end, out);
}

Converted code:

void print(Iterator start, Iterator end, ostream& out=cout) {
  while(true) {
     if(start == end)
        return;
     out << *start << endl;

     // One assignment per function argument for 'general' tail recursion
     start = start + 1;       // (1)
     end = end;               // (2)
     out = out;               // (3)
  }
}

The three assignments as in the explanation are included. Assignment (1) is embedded in the start++, assignments (2) and (3) are optimized away.

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1  
Well, if you want to be really strict about the conversion, the second code should increment start in the output expression (like the first one), and simply do start = start at the end of the loop. This is why the example is badly chosen, it does not modify the arguments while passing them in the recursive call... –  Luc Touraille Aug 29 '11 at 13:49
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The assignment is hidden in the increment operator:

start++;

is in fact an assignment:

start = start+1;

Actually, the example (part one) is not very good.

out << *start++ << endl;
print(start, end, out);

should be

out << *start << endl;
print( start+1, end, out);
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2  
Not true. That assignment is in both examples. –  mydogisbox Aug 29 '11 at 13:03
1  
@mydogisbox: I edited my answer to show a "typical" recursive call. –  ur. Aug 29 '11 at 13:08
    
Nice clarification - the original example's "replacing" one assignment with exactly the same assignment was very confusing. –  molbdnilo Aug 29 '11 at 14:48
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I don't think, whatever passage you are referring is important; just focus on the main problem, where you want to convert a recursive function to a normal iterative function, which can be done (effortlessly) as,

void print(Iterator start, Iterator end, ostream& out=cout) {
   while(start != end) {
      out << *start++ << endl;
    }
}
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1  
+1. Correct and Concise. :-) –  Nawaz Aug 29 '11 at 13:21
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It is hidden a little in C++, but start++ is assigning a new value to each time in the loop.

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2  
Not true. That assignment is in both examples. –  mydogisbox Aug 29 '11 at 13:02
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What they are talking about is, that you assign the arguments of the tail function call to the parameter variables of this function invocation, but in this case it is not neccessary, as you are calling the function with the exact same arguments (because like others said, the change to the first argument start happened before the function call).

Actually, if done precisely, the iterative function should look like

void print(Iterator start, Iterator end, ostream& out=cout) {
    while(true) {
        if(start == end)
            return;
        out << *start++ << endl;

        start = start;
        end = end;
        out = out;
    }
}

But these assignments are completely unneccessary, even if conpectually correct.

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