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Not how to insert a newline before a line. This is asking how to insert a newline before a pattern within a line.

For example,

sed 's/regexp/&\n/g'

will insert a newline behind the regexp pattern.

How can I do the same but in front of the pattern?

Here is an example input file

somevariable (012)345-6789

Should become

somevariable

(012)345-6789

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This is a bad question (the answer is “just switch the order”), but fortuitously elicited a good discussion of newlines in sed! –  Nils von Barth Nov 10 at 0:04
    
@NilsvonBarth the question is a lot more general and complicated than it seems on the surface. The answer in some cases is not as simple as switching the order, as you can see from the many answers. –  Dennis Nov 10 at 13:09
    
No, the literal question is straightforward: you ask: "sed 's/regexp/&\n/g' will insert a newline behind the regexp pattern. How can I do the same but in front of the pattern?" to which the answer, which you give yourself, is "switch the order". If &\n works for after, then \n& works for before. The general question of how to handle newlines in sed is complicated and good, but the specific question is straightforward and bad. –  Nils von Barth Nov 11 at 6:05
    
The answer I gave is a answer, not the answer as it doesn't work in every case meaning that for many it's not the answer (and SO is meant to be useful for every programmer, not just the person who asked the question). What seems to bother you is that one of the answers is to simply switch the &\n to \n&. Since you keep mentioning that the order switch makes the question a bad one, then by that logic it would better if it didn't include the example for inserting a newline behind the pattern because then one answer is no longer to "switch the order". –  Dennis Nov 11 at 8:52

13 Answers 13

This works on Linux and OS X:

sed 's/regexp/\'$'\n/g'

In general, for $ followed by a string literal with a backslash bash performs C-style backslash substitution, e.g. $'\t' is translated to a literal tab. Plus, sed wants your newline literal be escaped with a backslash, hence the \ before $. And finally, the dollar sign itself shouldn't be quoted so that it's interpreted by the shell, therefore we close the quote before the $ and immediately open it again.

Update: the method above can be used for any C-style "escapable" char. If you just need a new line, then perhaps this is easier to remember:

sed "s/regexp/`echo`/g"

Note the double quotes in this case; it's because the echo command in backticks `echo` should be interpreted by the shell.

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This gives me "unescaped newline inside substitute pattern" on OSX. –  Matt Gibson Jul 29 '13 at 9:44
    
@Matt Gibson that's very strange because "unescaped newline" is given only when you have a real newline without a backslash within the substitution pattern. My code above works, in fact, in some other shells too, e.g. zsh, ksh. –  mojuba Jul 29 '13 at 13:01
    
@Matt Gibson ... or if you forget the backslash before '$'\n in my code. –  mojuba Jul 29 '13 at 13:03
    
+1 this is fantastic, works in both OSX and Linux too –  janos Dec 22 '13 at 15:29
1  
As written, these expressions replace the regex completely with a newline, rather than inserting a newline in the middle of an existing line as requested. Here's how I used a modified form of this answer to insert a newline between two matched patterns: sed '\(first match\)\(second match\)/\1\'$'\n''\2/g'. Note the two single quotes after the \n. The first closes off the "$" section so that the remainder of the line is not affected by it. Without those quotes, the \2 was ignored. –  David Ravetti Jul 28 at 15:46

On my mac, the following inserts a single 'n' instead of newline:

sed 's/regexp/\n&/g'

This replaces with newline:

sed "s/regexp/\\`echo -e '\n\r'`/g"
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I was doing inline edit sed -i '' -e ... and was having problems with a ^M caret M (ctrl+m) getting written to the file. I ended up using perl with the same params. –  Steve Tauber May 25 '13 at 1:11
1  
Please be aware of the fact that the second code inserts a special newline code LF CR (reverse of the MS-DOS CR LF)! Both Unix-like OSes and Mac OS X use just LF (\n). –  pabouk Dec 3 '13 at 13:07
    
Something else in my sed expression was causing so much unhappiness (despite it working fine without the echo... and newline) that I just did this in vim. –  Ahmed Fasih Jan 17 at 18:02
    
Or simply: sed "s/regexp/`echo`/g" - this will produce a single LF instead of LF-CR –  mojuba Apr 29 at 12:10
up vote 14 down vote accepted

I tried some of the examples but they didn't seem to work. However, I found a solution. I simply had to switch the position of & and \n.

sed 's/regexp/\n&/g' 

edit: This doesn't work on a Mac apparently. See the answer further below that works for Mac.

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2  
I'm not sure this works in all versions of sed. I tried this on my Mac and the \n just gets output as 'n' –  tgamblin Apr 6 '09 at 21:13

In sed, you can't add newlines in the output stream easily. You need to use a continuation line, which is awkward, but it works:

$ sed 's/regexp/\
&/'

Example:

$ echo foo | sed 's/.*/\
&/'

foo

See here for details. If you want something slightly less awkward you could try using perl -pe with match groups instead of sed:

$ echo foo | perl -pe 's/(.*)/\n$1/'

foo

$1 refers to the first matched group in the regular expression, where groups are in parentheses.

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Why do you say you can't add newlines? You can just do sed 's/regexp/&\n/g' That's it –  Andres Nov 9 '12 at 1:25
echo one,two,three | sed 's/,/\
/g'
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+1 worked perfectly and pretty stright-forward/easy-to-remember –  gmale Jun 26 '13 at 19:34

In this case, I do not use sed. I use tr.

cat Somefile |tr ',' '\012' 

This takes the comma and replaces it with the carriage return.

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To insert a newline to output stream on Linux, I used:

sed -i "s/def/abc\\\ndef/" file1

Where file1 was:

def

Before the sed in-place replacement, and:

abc
def

After the sed in-place replacement. Please note the use of \\\n. If the patterns have a " inside it, escape using \".

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for me (Bash inside Linux) \\n works just as well. –  mark.kedzierski Jul 25 '13 at 20:54
    
For me the code above does not work. sed inserts \n instead of LF because it gets \\n in the parameter from the shell. --- This code works: sed -i "s/def/abc\ndef/" file1. --- GNU sed version 4.2.1, GNU bash, version 4.1.2(1) / 4.2.25(1) (CentOS release 6.4 / Ubuntu 12.04.3). –  pabouk Dec 3 '13 at 12:50

Hmm, just escaped newlines seem to work in more recent versions of sed (I have GNU sed 4.2.1),

dev:~/pg/services/places> echo 'foobar' | sed -r 's/(bar)/\n\1/;'
foo
bar
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in sed you can reference groups in your pattern with "\1", "\2", .... so if the pattern you're looking for is "PATTERN", and you want to insert "BEFORE" in front of it, you can use, sans escaping

sed 's/(PATTERN)/BEFORE\1/g'

i.e.

  sed 's/\(PATTERN\)/BEFORE\1/g'
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Actually this doesn't work for inserting a newline. Try it. –  tgamblin Apr 6 '09 at 20:58
    
Just did: testfile contents="ABC ABC ABC". Ran "sed 's/\(ABC\)/\n\1/g' testfile, got the newlines. Experiment with the escapes, try to add 1 thing at a time to your pattern, e.g. make sure you're matching the pattern, then check the group matching, then add the newline checking. –  Steve B. Apr 6 '09 at 21:02
    
I just tried exactly that and got "nABC nABC nABC'. Are you using some other version of sed? –  tgamblin Apr 6 '09 at 21:08
    
shell escaping is probably getting in the way of tgamblin's attempts. putting the full sed arguments in single quotes like Steve B did should fix that. Possible though that different versions of sed don't understand the \n for newline. –  Dan Pritts May 21 at 18:06
sed -e 's/regexp/\0\n/g'

\0 is the null, so your expression is replaced with null (nothing) and then...
\n is the new line

On some flavors of Unix doesn't work, but I think it's the solution at your problem.

echo "Hello" | sed -e 's/Hello/\0\ntmow/g'
Hello
tmow
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Does not work on Mac OS –  Alexander Guiness Jul 21 '13 at 15:10

In vi on Red Hat, I was able to insert carriage returns using just the \r character. I believe this internally executes 'ex' instead of 'sed', but it's similar, and vi can be another way to do bulk edits such as code patches. For example. I am surrounding a search term with an if statement that insists on carriage returns after the braces:

:.,$s/\(my_function(.*)\)/if(!skip_option){\r\t\1\r\t}/

Note that I also had it insert some tabs to make things align better.

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This works in MAC for me

sed -i.bak -e 's/regex/xregex/g' input.txt sed -i.bak -e 's/qregex/\'$'\nregex/g' input.txt

Dono whether its perfect one...

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You can use perl one-liners much like you do with sed, with the advantage of full perl regular expression support.

In this case, you can do

perl -pe 's/(regex)/\n$1/'

-pe puts perl into a "execute and print" loop, much like sed's normal mode of operation.

' quotes everything else so the shell won't interfere

() surrounding the regex is a grouping operator. $1 on the right side of the substitution prints out whatever was matched inside these parens.

Finally, \n is a newline.

Regardless of whether you are using parentheses as a grouping operator, you have to escape any parentheses in your regex. So a regex to match the pattern you list above would be something like

\(\d\d\d\)\d\d\d-\d\d\d\d

\( or \) matches a literal paren, and \d matches a digit.

Better:

\(\d{3}\)\d{3}-\d{4}

I imagine you can figure out what the numbers in braces are doing.

Bonus tip - if you have the pcre package installed, it comes with pcregrep, which uses full perl-compatible regexes.

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