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I am facing an error on my SQL script:

Arithmetic overflow error converting numeric to data type numeric

select x.MemberName,x.DOB,x.FilePath,x.Medication,x.NDC,x.Directions,x.Name,x.Strength,x.GenericName,x.QtyOrdered,x.DaysSupply,x.DateFilled, 
CASE
    WHEN x.test = 0  THEN 'N/A'
    WHEN compliance > 100.0   THEN '100.0'
    ELSE CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), CAST(FLOOR(compliance *10)/10.0 AS DECIMAL(3,1)))
END as [Compliance]

I am facing the error on just above syntax line.

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and what values does column compliance hold? –  Mitch Wheat Aug 29 '11 at 14:46
    
it has values like 'N/A','100.0' or '99.1' ... i.e) it has both float and nvarchar –  goofyui Aug 29 '11 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's your problem:

declare @compliance decimal(10,5)

set @compliance = 100.0  --  <----------------

select CAST(FLOOR(@compliance *10)/10.0 AS DECIMAL(3,1))

Throws "Arithmetic overflow error converting numeric to data type numeric" error. Changing to DECIMAL(4,1) works, or as @paola suggests, change your condition to >= 100.0

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@Compliance has to accept both NVARCHAR and FLOAT. i.e) If there is no Compliance .. we need to set it as N/A –  goofyui Aug 29 '11 at 14:50
    
I'm not suggesting otherwise. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 29 '11 at 14:51
1  
@Chok, I think Mitch is right, you probably need to change your second case to WHEN compliance >= 100.0 (note the >= ) –  Paolo Falabella Aug 29 '11 at 14:53
    
@Mitch is right !! I changed my datatype to DECIMAL(4,1) –  goofyui Aug 29 '11 at 15:00

This questions has already been answered, but the why is important.

Numeric defines the TOTAL number of digits, and then the number after the decimal.

So DECIMAL(4,1) shows 123.4 DECIMAL(4,3) shows 1.234

In both cases you have a total of 4 digits. In one case you have 1 after the decimal, leaving 3 in front of the decimal. And vice versa.

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