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I have the following method for doing a check digit on a tracking number, but it just feels lengthy/sloppy. Can it be refactored and just generally cleaned up?

I'm running Ruby 1.8.7.

def is_fedex(number)
  n = number.reverse[0..14]

  check_digit = n.first.to_i

  even_numbers = n[1..1].to_i + n[3..3].to_i + n[5..5].to_i + n[7..7].to_i + n[9..9].to_i + n[11..11].to_i + n[13..13].to_i

  even_numbers = even_numbers * 3

  odd_numbers = n[2..2].to_i + n[4..4].to_i + n[6..6].to_i + n[8..8].to_i + n[10..10].to_i + n[12..12].to_i + n[14..14].to_i

  total = even_numbers + odd_numbers

  multiple_of_ten = total + 10 - (total % 10)

  remainder = multiple_of_ten - total

  if remainder == check_digit
    true
  else
    false
  end
end

EDIT: Here are valid and invalid numbers.

Valid: 9612019950078574025848

Invalid: 9612019950078574025847

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1  
Boolean expressions already evaluate to true or false, so instead of the if at the end, you can just do remainder == check_digit. – Michael Kohl Aug 29 '11 at 15:37
    
Do you have an example of a valid and an invalid number? That allows people that answer to test their code before posting. – Martijn Aug 29 '11 at 15:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted
def is_fedex(number)
  total = (7..20).inject(0) {|sum, i| sum + number[i..i].to_i * ( i.odd? ? 1 : 3 ) }
  number[-1].to_i == (total / 10.0).ceil * 10 - total
end

I believe you should keep your code. While it's not idiomatic or clever, it's the one you will have the least trouble to understand a few months from now.

share|improve this answer

I'm not a ruby programmer, so if any of the syntax is off, I apologize but you should get the general idea. A few things I see: First, you don't need to slice the array, a single index should be sufficient. Second, Instead of splitting even and odd, you could do something like this:

total = 0
for i in (1..14)
  total += n[i].to_i * ( i % 2 == 1 ? 1 : 3 )
end

Third, remainder could be simplified to 10 - (total % 10).

share|improve this answer
    
You could use i.odd? instead of i % 2 == 1 – Benoit Garret Aug 29 '11 at 15:53

I realize you're running 1.8.7, but here's my attempt using each_slice and inject in conjunction, a 1.9.2 feature:

def is_fedex(number)
  total = number.reverse[1..14].split(//).map(&:to_i).each_slice(2).inject(0) do |t, (e,o)|
    t += e*3 + o 
  end
  10 - (total % 10) == number[-1].to_i 
end

It passes both tests

share|improve this answer
    
Oh nice, I didn't know you could use each_with_index along with inject – Benoit Garret Aug 29 '11 at 16:40
    
With each_slice(2) instead of each_with_index you can handle pairs of odd and even indexed numbers., eliminating the need for repeated testing for evenness. – steenslag Aug 30 '11 at 20:47

Give this a try:

#assuming number comes in as a string
def is_fedex(number)
  n = number.reverse[0..14].scan(/./)
  check_digit = n[0].to_i
  total = 0
  n[1..14].each_with_index {|d,i| total += d.to_i * (i.even? ? 3 : 1) }
  check_digit == 10 - (total % 10)
end

> is_fedex("12345678901231")  => true

edit incorporating simplified remainder logic as Kevin suggested

share|improve this answer

Something like this?

def is_fedex(number)
  even_arr, odd_arr = number.to_s[1..13].split(//).map(&:to_i).partition.with_index { |n, i| i.even? }
  total = even_arr.inject(:+) * 3 + odd_arr.inject(:+)

  number.to_s.reverse[0..0].to_i == (total + 10 - (total % 10)) - total
end

If you can give me a valid and invalid number I can test if it works and maybe tweak it further :)

share|improve this answer
    
God, I love Enumerable :D – Martijn Aug 29 '11 at 16:05
    
Valid: 9612019950078574025848 and Invalid: 9612019950078574025847 – Shpigford Aug 29 '11 at 16:06
    
yes enumerable has all sorts of fun tricks... though I think you may have outsmarted yourself trying to separate the even and odd numbers out... when instead you could just loop through and do the math in one pass. :) – DGM Aug 29 '11 at 16:14
    
@DGM yeah definately.. I should have looked at the whole original example first instead of refactoring it line by line. – Martijn Aug 29 '11 at 16:16

This function should to:

def is_fedex(number)
  # sanity check
  return false unless number.length == 15

  data = number[0..13].reverse
  check_digit = number[14..14].to_i

  total = (0..data.length-1).inject(0) do |total, i|
    total += data[i..i].to_i * 3**((i+1)%2)
  end

  (10 - total % 10) == check_digit
end

The arithmetic expression 3**((i+1)%2) might look a bit complex, but is essentially the same as (i.odd? ? 1 : 3). Both variants are correct, which you use is up to you (and might affect speed...)

Also note, that if you use Ruby 1.9, you can use data[i] instead of data[i..i] which is required for for Ruby 1.8.

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