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I would like to parse the named anchor from the href of a link when it is clicked. How can this be done?

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.my-links').click(function(e){
        var href = this.href; // http://example.com#myNamedAnchor
        // now parse out just 'myNamedAnchor'
    });
});
share|improve this question
1  
var s = "example.com#myNamedAnchor";; var parts = s.split('#'); var hash; if (parts.length > 1) { hash = parts[1]; } hash ; //# => myNamedAnchor – James Kyburz Aug 29 '11 at 16:42
    
I don't think any of your answers so far (except for the one in the comment above I think) account for URLs that don't happen to have an anchor suffix. You may want to clarify whether that's important. – Pointy Aug 29 '11 at 16:47
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can get the anchor with this.hash. To strip out the #, use this.hash.substr(1).

$('.my-links').click(function(e){
    var hash = this.hash.substr(1); // myNamedAnchor
});

See the MDN docs.

share|improve this answer
    
perfect. thank you! – Andrew Aug 29 '11 at 17:01
$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.my-links').click(function(e){
        var href = this.href; // http://example.com#myNamedAnchor
        var hash = href.substr(href.indexOf('#'));
        alert(hash);
        return false;
    });
});

JS Fiddle demo.

If you don't want to include the # character, then amend the above to:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.my-links').click(function(e){
        var href = this.href; // http://example.com#myNamedAnchor
        var hash = href.substr(href.indexOf('#') + 1);
        alert(hash);
        return false;
    });
});

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

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Will print it out along with the # use +1 to get rid of it :) – Madara Uchiha Aug 29 '11 at 16:46
1  
I know, I was editing that in as you added the comment (it was within the grace period, at least...). But thank you for the catch! =D – David Thomas Aug 29 '11 at 16:48
$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.my-links').click(function(e){
        var href = this.href; // http://example.com#myNamedAnchor
        var myNamedAnchor = href.match(/[^#]*$/);
    });
});

That'll do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the regex? substr and indexOf are 100% sufficient. – Madara Uchiha Aug 29 '11 at 16:46
    
Well, I guess it's a valid, albeit complicated, alternative...and it expands the options at least. – David Thomas Aug 29 '11 at 16:49
    
I like it because it's non-complicated O_o what's simpler than /[^#]*$/? (!) – Joseph Marikle Aug 29 '11 at 17:35

I think you could do:

$('.my-links').click(function(e){
     //if  http://example.com#myNamedAnchor hash = myNamedAnchor 
     var hash=this.hash;        
});
share|improve this answer
    
-1. He want's the link's hash, not the location's. – Madara Uchiha Aug 29 '11 at 16:45
    
it has to load first though. This is in the click event so the poster is trying to catch it before the request is sent. – Joseph Marikle Aug 29 '11 at 16:45

Use

parsedHref = href.substr(href.indexOf("#")+1);

To find whatever is after the hash.

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