Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems like wherever I call ReportProgress on my BackgroundWorker, the processing of that method stops so my work never finishes. Example:

int numQuals = this.Model.Names.Count();
int currentQual = 0;
int fivePercent = (int)(numQuals * .05);
foreach (var qualName in this.Model.Names)
{
    if ((worker != null) && ((currentQual % fivePercent == 0)))
    {
        worker.ReportProgress((int) (((float)++currentQual / numQuals) * 100));
    }

    // This next line never processes. I can debug and it will 
    // break at the ReportProgress line but won't ever break here
    this.myContainer.Add(...
}

Does anyone have any idea why this is?

share|improve this question
2  
Debug + Exceptions, tick the Thrown checkbox. And add code to do something with e.Error in your RunWorkerCompleted event handler. –  Hans Passant Aug 29 '11 at 17:02
1  
What you have posted tells us nothing. How about posting the code for ReportProgress –  Ramhound Aug 29 '11 at 17:41
1  
@Ramhound: He can't. BackgroundWorker.ReportProgress(int) is part of the .NET Framework. –  Allon Guralnek Aug 29 '11 at 18:02
1  
All ReportProgress does is raise the ProgressChanged event. If that's blocking then his event handler is blocking. We need to see his event handler. –  Dour High Arch Aug 29 '11 at 19:11
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you set worker.WorkerReportsProgress=true ? Otherwise, the background worker will terminate with an exception and the work will not be fullfilled.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, that is set. –  KrisTrip Aug 29 '11 at 17:04
1  
@KrisTrip: Then you have to check with the debuger. Be aware that if you have in the ReportProgress-event any faulty code, this will break the execution of the background worker. THis means that the error is either in the line where you call ReportProgress (division by zero or something like this) or the error is in the ReportProgress eventhandler. –  Chris Valentine Aug 29 '11 at 17:08
    
Yup, turns out a had a silly error in the eventhandler causing an exception. This is why I shouldn't be lazy and always make sure I check e.Error as @Hans Passant said. –  KrisTrip Aug 29 '11 at 19:54
add comment

I would recommend separating out your calculating logic to a different line. I hate seeing inline stuff like this from other developers. It's harder to read and harder to debug (as your question points out).

Your worker should never be null if you are inside the do work method. Although I do recommend performing null checks - if a null existed here something else is majorly wrong.

 if ((worker != null) && ((currentQual % fivePercent == 0)))
 {
        object result =  ((float)++currentQual / (float)numQuals) * 100;
        int resultint = 0;
        if(Int32.TryParse(result.ToString(), out resultint))
        {
            worker.ReportProgress(Convert.ToInt32(result));
        }
 }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.