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Does maven require a connection to the internet at some point to be able to use it? Meaning specifically getting the internal maven plugins for compiling, cleaning, packaging, etc?

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Do you have any machine with internet access? Maybe a server? –  Marcelo Aug 29 '11 at 17:14
    
We do, but to get things from there to the development environment is well, tedious. –  predhme Aug 29 '11 at 17:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You can run maven in offline mode mvn -o install. Of course any artifacts not available in your local repository will fail. Maven is not predicated on distributed repositories, but they certainly make things more seamless. Its for this reason that many shops use internal mirrors that are incrementally synced with the central repos.

In addition, the mvn dependency:go-offline can be used to ensure you have all of your dependencies installed locally before you begin to work offline.

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Inconjuntion with this answer, I discovered that mvn comes with its "core" plugins (i.e. compiler). So this with mvn install I can get what I need. –  predhme Aug 29 '11 at 20:48
3  
Also consider you can use "mvn dependency:go-offline" to ensure all the dependencies referred to in your pom.xml are present in your local repository. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 3 '14 at 16:01
    
Unfortunately mvn dependency:go-offline simply does not catch everything. Inside a fresh virtual machine, for example, my project still must download things even after running this goal. See also this issue. –  phs Aug 12 '14 at 21:01
    
This was literally answered years ago, as with any set of plugins, techniques, and tools YMMV. –  nsfyn55 Aug 14 '14 at 14:07

If you have a PC with internet access in your LAN, you should install a local Maven repository.

I recommend Artifactory Open Source. This is what we use in our organization, it is really easy to setup.

Artifactory acts as a proxy between your build tool (Maven, Ant, Ivy, Gradle etc.) and the outside world.

It caches remote artifacts so that you don’t have to download them over and over again.

It blocks unwanted (and sometimes security-sensitive) external requests for internal artifacts and controls how and where artifacts are deployed, and by whom.

After setting up Artifactory you just need to change Maven's settings.xml in the development machines:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<settings xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/SETTINGS/1.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/settings-1.0.0.xsd" xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/SETTINGS/1.0.0"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <mirrors>
    <mirror>
      <mirrorOf>*</mirrorOf>
      <name>repo</name>
      <url>http://maven.yourorganization.com:8081/artifactory/repo</url>
      <id>repo</id>
    </mirror>
  </mirrors>
  <profiles>
    <profile>
      <repositories>
        <repository>
          <snapshots>
            <enabled>false</enabled>
          </snapshots>
          <id>central</id>
          <name>libs-release</name>
          <url>http://maven.yourorganization.com:8081/artifactory/libs-release</url>
        </repository>
        <repository>
          <snapshots />
          <id>snapshots</id>
          <name>libs-snapshot</name>
          <url>http://maven.yourorganization.com:8081/artifactory/libs-snapshot</url>
        </repository>
      </repositories>
      <pluginRepositories>
        <pluginRepository>
          <snapshots>
            <enabled>false</enabled>
          </snapshots>
          <id>central</id>
          <name>plugins-release</name>
          <url>http://maven.yourorganization.com:8081/artifactory/plugins-release</url>
        </pluginRepository>
        <pluginRepository>
          <snapshots />
          <id>snapshots</id>
          <name>plugins-snapshot</name>
          <url>http://maven.yourorganization.com:8081/artifactory/plugins-snapshot</url>
        </pluginRepository>
      </pluginRepositories>
      <id>artifactory</id>
    </profile>
  </profiles>
  <activeProfiles>
    <activeProfile>artifactory</activeProfile>
  </activeProfiles>
</settings>

We used this solution because we had problems with internet access in our development machines and some artifacts downloaded corrupted files or didn't download at all. We haven't had problems since.

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There is not a machine with access that is connected to the LAN. –  predhme Aug 29 '11 at 17:46
1  
With artifactory you can backup your whole repository and then restore it in one of the PCs that is in the LAN. –  Marcelo Aug 29 '11 at 18:11

Maven needs the dependencies in your local repository. The easiest way to get them is with internet access (or harder using other solutions provided here).

So assumed that you can get temporarily internet access you can prepare to go offline using the maven-dependency-plugin with its dependency:go-offline goal. This will download all your project dependencies to your local repository (of course changes in the dependencies / plugins will require new internet / central repository access).

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You have two options for this:

1.) make changes in the settings.xml add this in first tag

<localRepository>C:/Users/admin/.m2/repository</localRepository>

2.) use the -o tag for offline command.

mvn -o clean install -DskipTests=true
mvn -o jetty:run
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In preparation before working offline just run mvn dependency:go-offline

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Does this work for you?

http://jojovedder.blogspot.com/2009/04/running-maven-offline-using-local.html

Don't forget to add it to your plugin repository and point the url to wherever your repository is.

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>local</id>
        <url>file://D:\mavenrepo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>
<pluginRepositories>
    <pluginRepository>
        <id>local</id>
        <url>file://D:\mavenrepo</url>
    </pluginRepository>
</pluginRepositories>

If not, you may need to run a local server, e.g. apache, on your machines.

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That seems to be more for dependencies and plugins like the jetty, tomcat, etc plugins. I am more concerned about the internal maven plugins like maven-compiler-plugin –  predhme Aug 29 '11 at 17:49
    
@predhme: This approach will work for all plugins, since all of these go into the maven repository on your local machine –  JoseK Oct 10 '11 at 11:26

Answering your question directly: it does not require an internet connection, but access to a repository, on LAN or local disk (use hints from other people who posted here).

If your project is not in a mature phase, that means when POMs are changed quite often, offline mode will be very impractical, as you'll have to update your repository quite often, too. Unless you can get a copy of a repository that has everything you need, but how would you know? Usually you start a repository from scratch and it gets cloned gradually during development (on a computer connected to another repository). A copy of the repo1.maven.org public repository weighs hundreds of gigabytes, so I wouldn't recommend brute force, either.

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It is, but not as a maven project (ant). So I have all the libs I need but was wondering specifically about maven internal libs. Such as maven-plugin-compiler. –  predhme Aug 29 '11 at 20:49
    
If you have all the dependencies handled by Ant, you probably lack Maven metadata anyway, so Maven won't pick them up. As for "Maven internal libs", the only way to download them is to build your pom structure and run it on an internet-connected computer. By "run it" I mean executing every target that you think you'll be using, not necessarily only "mvn clean install". –  MaDa Aug 30 '11 at 7:15

Before going offline you have to make sure that everything is in your local repo, which is required while working offline. Running "mvn dependency:go-offline" for the project(s)/pom(s), you intend to work on, will reduce the efforts to achieve this.

But it´s usually not the whole story, because dependency:go-offline will only download the "bare build" plugins (go-offline / resolve-plugins does not resolve all plugin dependencies). So you have to find a way to download deploy / test / site plugins (and maybe others) and their dependencies into your repo.

Furthermore dependency:go-offline does not download the pom´s artifact itself, so you have to dependency:copy it if required.

Sometimes - as MaDa wrote - you do not know, what you will need, while being offline, which makes it pretty impossible to have a "sufficient" repo.

Anyway having a properly filled repo you only have to add "<offline>true</offline>" to Maven´s settings.xml to go offline.

Do not change the Maven profile (id) you used to fill your repo, while being offline. Maven recognizes the downloaded artifacts in its metadata with an "identity", which is bound to the profile id.

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