Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using MSBuild for our CI process and I'm trying to find a way to get the folder name of a folder higher up in the filesystem hierarchy. This folder would hold all the tools for the CI.

The folder I'm looking for can be located at various places on each PC.

Let's say that the MSBuild script is executing in the D:\Workdir\BlaBla\Project1 and the folder I'm interested in is D:\Workdir\CI

I would like the script to traverse the filesystem as follows:

  1. Look in current dir (D:\WorkDir\BlaBla\Project1), check for CI folder (not found)
  2. Go up in the hierarchy (D:\Workdir\BlaBla) and check for CI folder (not found)
  3. Go up again (D:\Workdir) and check for CI folder (Found!)

Is this feasible in MSBuild?


NOTES

Just to clarify, I want to get the result (the location of the folder) in a property.


Here's what I have so far and trying to better it ;)

<PropertyGroup>
    <CI_PathName Condition=" Exists ('..\CI') ">..\CI</CI_PathName >
    <CI_PathName Condition=" Exists ('..\..\CI') ">..\..\CI</CI_PathName >
    <CI_PathName Condition=" Exists ('..\..\..\CI') ">..\..\..\CI</CI_PathName >
</PropertyGroup>

This works but it is not optimal...

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do this using an inline task:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<Project DefaultTargets="Build" ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
<UsingTask
    TaskName="FindParentDirectory"
    TaskFactory="CodeTaskFactory"
    AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.Build.Tasks.v4.0.dll">

    <ParameterGroup>
        <BaseDirectory ParameterType="Microsoft.Build.Framework.ITaskItem" Required="true" />
        <TargetDirectoryName ParameterType="System.String" Required="true" />
        <TargetDirectory ParameterType="System.String" Output="true" />
    </ParameterGroup>
    <Task>
        <Using Namespace="System.IO" />
        <Code Type="Fragment" Language="cs">
            <![CDATA[
                string baseDirectoryPath = BaseDirectory.GetMetadata("FullPath");
                DirectoryInfo baseDirectory = new DirectoryInfo(baseDirectoryPath);
                DirectoryInfo[] childDirectories = baseDirectory.GetDirectories(TargetDirectoryName);
                if (childDirectories.Length == 1)
                {
                    TargetDirectory = childDirectories[0].FullName;

                    return true;
                }

                while (baseDirectory != baseDirectory.Root)
                {
                    baseDirectory = baseDirectory.Parent;
                    if (baseDirectory.Name == TargetDirectoryName)
                    {
                        TargetDirectory = baseDirectory.FullName;

                        return true;
                    }

                    childDirectories = baseDirectory.GetDirectories(TargetDirectoryName);
                    if (childDirectories.Length == 1)
                    {
                        TargetDirectory = childDirectories[0].FullName;

                        return true;
                    }
                }

                Log.LogError("Unable to find recursively find a directory called '{0}' in a parent of '{1}'.", TargetDirectoryName, baseDirectoryPath);

                return false;

            ]]>
        </Code>
    </Task>
</UsingTask>

<Target Name="Build">
    <FindParentDirectory
        BaseDirectory="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)"
        TargetDirectoryName="Development">

        <Output
            TaskParameter="TargetDirectory"
            PropertyName="TargetDir" />
    </FindParentDirectory>

    <Message
        Text="TargetDir = '$(TargetDir)'"
        Importance="high" />
</Target>

share|improve this answer
    
Great! Didn't know I could do that! –  Stécy Aug 31 '11 at 17:15

Yes, you can use the "Exec" tag and set its "Command" attribute in any Target of MS Build. Open the project file in text mode and you can add your command inside the Target that you might want (for example, Target "BeforeBuild", if you want your script to be executed before the Build)

EDIT:

Open your project file in text mode, navigate to the section: <Target Name="BeforeBuild">. Add the Exec node within this Target Node. Once you are done your Target node might look like this:

<Target Name="BeforeBuild">
    <Exec Command="yourscript or any DOS command" />
    ... if you had anything before in this section leave them as is
</Target>
share|improve this answer
    
hmmm... Not sure I follow. Can you clarify? –  Stécy Aug 29 '11 at 18:14
    
I assume you want your script to get executed before the Build, is that correct? If yes, please read on to the edit (I am unable to format the code sections in this "Comment"). –  Arun Aug 29 '11 at 18:18
    
Well, I want to get the location of the folder ;) –  Stécy Aug 29 '11 at 18:20
    
Can you create a batch to handle this requirement of looking for the CI folder? –  Arun Aug 29 '11 at 18:23
    
Surely could but I wanted to know if there was a way with MSBuild only. –  Stécy Aug 29 '11 at 18:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.