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I have faced the following interview question.

Consider this function declaration:

void quiz(int i)
{
    if (i > 1)
    {
        quiz(i / 2);
        quiz(i / 2);
    }
    writeOutput("*");
}

How many asterisks are printed by the function call quiz(5)?

My answer was:

Languages (Javascript, PHP, etc.) with integer division result type is float - seven asterisks. Function quiz get called:

  1. With i=5 – once, asterisk printed.
  2. With i=2.5 – twice, asterisks printed.
  3. With i=1.25 – four times, asterisks printed.
  4. With i=0.625 – eight times, no asterisks printed

Languages (C/C++, C#, Java, etc.) which division result type name is integer - three asterisks. Function quiz get called:

  1. With i=5 – once, asterisk printed.
  2. With i=2 – twice, asterisks printed.
  3. With i=1 – four times, asterisks not printed.

Question syntax is like C/C++, Java, so the answer would be three

The interview was a closed book exam - during the interview I was unable to run this code and check it. The interviewer told me that my answer is not absolutely correct (or at least, they didn't expect it to be like this). Hovewer, I've ran this code (with PHP, Javascript and C#) at home and the result was as I described.

So, are there some caveats I'm missing or my answer was just more detailed than they were expecting?

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I don't know off the top of my head how accurate or correct your answer is (though I'd consider it a good answer if I were giving the interview), but there's always the possibility where the interviewer is incorrect or just plain doesn't know any better, even if he thinks he does. I've been on a fair share of interviews where the guy behind the desk wasn't qualified for the job for which I was interviewing. –  David Aug 29 '11 at 18:19
    
Running that code does not give me the answer you described. –  Dour High Arch Aug 29 '11 at 18:56
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you change the code to this:

void quiz(int i)
{
    if (i > 1)
    {
        quiz(i / 2);
        quiz(i / 2);
    }
    printf("* for %d\n", i);
}

You'll see that the result for quiz(5) is:

* for 1
* for 1
* for 2
* for 1
* for 1
* for 2
* for 5

So, you got the correct number of calls per i, you just didn't notice that the writeOutput is outside the if, not inside it.

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Yes, absolutely right. I think I've answered what they really were asking for, but not the question itself. Thank you for the answer. –  J0HN Aug 30 '11 at 4:17
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writeOutput is going to be called when i <= 1, too.

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Well, just as usual, something pretty simple. Thanks for the answer. –  J0HN Aug 30 '11 at 4:15
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Given that the function takes an int as a parameter, it will (under usual circumstances) never get 2.5 as an argument. Unless of course one says #define double int, but in that case nothing is reliable anymore.

So your answer should probably just have been the second part of your answer.

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But the second part of his answer is wrong. –  Dour High Arch Aug 29 '11 at 18:57
    
Run it in PHP or Javascript - it certainly will. –  J0HN Aug 30 '11 at 4:14
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I get 7 in Java:

public class fun {



public void quiz(int i)
{

    if (i > 1)
    {
        quiz(i / 2);
        quiz(i / 2);
    }
    System.out.println("Value of i = " + i);
    System.out.println("*");
}

public static void main(String[] args){

    fun f = new fun();
    f.quiz(5);

}
}

output =

Value of i = 1
*
Value of i = 1
*
Value of i = 2
*
Value of i = 1
*
Value of i = 1
*
Value of i = 2
*
Value of i = 5
*

Two things make this simple function hard to trace manually.

First : Recursion. Recursive function use the call stack and it can be hard to keep trace of the state of i on paper.... especially in an interview ;-)

Second : like other said, the print(*) was outside the if... maybe a little catch!

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Yes, the writeOutput was outside the if. And I was running the code with writeOutput inside it. –  J0HN Aug 30 '11 at 4:15
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I think along with the answer, the interviewer would have been happy if you could provide the complexity analysis. The complexity is 2**ceil(lg(n))-1 (where ** is power operator) :

You can visualize this by writing a tree and what we get is a strict and complete binary tree (below is for n=5 and few nodes omitted for brevity)

           5
         /   \
        2     2
       / \   /  \
      1   1 1    1
     / \  ..........
    0   0 ..............

Also from the question, I don't think the interviewer was expecting an analysis for other languages such as python 3.x, where default behavior is floating point division and the * will be printed even more times. when floating point numbers are preset, the number of calls is : 2 ** (ceil(lg(n))+1) -1 , (the call tree will be even more larger than the one for integer division, lets as excercise :) )

You can run this python code:

nCalls = 0
def quiz(n):
    global nCalls
    nCalls += 1
    if n>1:
        quiz(n/2)
        quiz(n/2)

test = [5, 9, 15]
for n in test:
    nCalls = 0
    quiz(n)
    print("nCalls for %d : %d" % (n,nCalls) )

on python 2.x: (integer division)

nCalls for 5 : 7
nCalls for 9 : 15
nCalls for 15 : 15

on python 3.x: (floating point)

nCalls for 5 : 15
nCalls for 9 : 31
nCalls for 15 : 31

HTH.

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