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Is simple assignement of the member vectors enough?

class WidgetNames
{
    WidgetNames(int sz)
    {
        unsigned char* c = new unsigned char[ sz ];
        memset(c,0,sz);
        m_names.push_back( c );
            m_len.push_back(sz);
    }
    ~WidgetNames()
    {
        for ( size_t i = 0 ; i < m_names.size() ; ++i )
        {
            if( m_names[i] != NULL )
            {
                delete [] m_names[i];
            }
        }   
    }
    WidgetNames(const WidgetNames &other)
    {
        m_names = other.m_names;
    }
    std::vector<unsigned char*> m_names;
    std::vector<int> m_len;
};

I am getting a crach in my destructor which makes me suspicious that the copy constructor might be the culprit. Or may be my problem is elsewhere

EDIT
Added length of the buffers. This is not the complete class def I just wanted to provide sufficient info to solicit help.
No, I can't use std:: string because I want to share the member vector with a c functions that can write to the buffers

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a really good reason why you can't use a vector of std::strings? –  Kerrek SB Aug 29 '11 at 18:29
    
@Kerrek SB The reason I can't use std::string is because I want to pass this to a database stored procedure as IN/OUT parameter i.e. the database driver will return the result into my string. May be there is a way to make std::string accomplish this; if there is I would be very happy to know how –  gonzales Aug 29 '11 at 18:48
2  
of course: take either a string or vector, resize() it to the requisite size, and pass &x[0] or .data() to the API. –  Kerrek SB Aug 29 '11 at 18:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As you don't store the size of the char array you allocate there isn't any way to do the copy constructor

Try using:

std::vector< std::vector< unsigned char > > m_names;

Your constructor would then look like this.

WidgetNames(int sz)
{
    std::vector< unsigned char > c;
    c.resize( sz );
    m_names.push_back( c );
}

instead. Or, even easier, as it looks like strings you are storing just use

std::vector< std::string > m_names;

Edit: The above not withstanding you would need to do the following in your copy constructor.

WidgetNames(const WidgetNames &other)
{
    int i = 0;
    while( i < m_names.size() )
    {
        delete[] m_names[i];
        i++;
    }

    m_names.resize( other.m_names.size() );
    m_len.resize( other.m_len.size() );
    i = 0;
    while( i < m_names.size() )
    {
        m_len[i]   = other.m_len[i];
        m_names[i] = new unsigned char[m_len[i]] );
        memcpy( m_names[i], other.m_names[i], m_len[i] );
        i++;
    }
}

You REALLY are massively better off using one of my original suggestions instead though. Far less open to errors.

share|improve this answer
    
Pls see my edit. I do store the size –  gonzales Aug 29 '11 at 18:49
    
@Gonzales: Edited. But still listen to the original advice. –  Goz Aug 29 '11 at 18:55
    
What happens to the memory allocated before the assignment. If you look at dario_ramos 's answer below he is releasing memory before doing the assignment. I didn't this this was necessary but it made me re think. I see you are simply resizing the old vector –  gonzales Aug 29 '11 at 19:00
    
@Gonzales: Hes right .. my error. Fixed. Still though .. is there any reason you can't use the std::vector< std::vector <> > construction? You do know you can get a pointer to the unsigned char array by doing &m_names[x].front()? Same would work for a std::vector< std::string > >. You then get the bonus that you don't need to faff about doing the above and potentially introducing orphaned memory bugs like I just did ... RAII FTW. –  Goz Aug 29 '11 at 19:03
    
A nested vector will not give me contigous memory. I want to be able to pass the entire array of strings as a void * –  gonzales Aug 29 '11 at 19:07

Your vector contains pointers to heap memory. Suppose you do widgetNamesA=widgetNamesB, and one of them goes out of scope. The destructor is invoked, and the memory is deleted. Since the other object pointed to the same addresses, it now points to garbage and any access will produce a crash.

You'd be better off using std::string() like the other answers suggest.

EDIT: If you can't use std::string, then do something like this:

WidgetNames(const WidgetNames &other){
   //Release owned memory
   for(int i=0; i<m_names.size(); i++ ){
      delete m_names[i];
   }
   m_names.clear();
   //Allocate new memory and copy right side's contents
   for(int i=0; i<other.m_names.size(); i++ ){
      m_names.push_back( new unsigned char[other.m_len[i]] );
      memcpy( m_names[i], other.m_names[i], other.m_len[i] );
   }
}

If you use smart pointers (like std::tr1::shared_ptr), you can forget about delete.

share|improve this answer

Then standard library vector is indeed copiable via simple assignment. Unfortunately, a unsigned char* is not, and the vector doesn't know that. Since you are manually handling the pointers construction and destruction, that means you have to manually handle the copy too.

Better practice would be to use an vector of std::string (or maybe std::basic_string), so that the construction/copy/move/destruction is all handled automatically.

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