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I was looking at the C++11 new features and one of them confuses me, because I can't figure out a way to use it in Real World.

It's Deleted and Defaulted Functions, does anyone have real world examples of it's usage or is it just one of those features that just adds some sugar?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
struct A
{
  A(const A& arg) : data(arg.data)
  {
    do_something_special();
  }

  // by writing copy constructor, we suppress the generation of
  // implicit default constructor A::A()

  int data;
};

void foo1()
{
  A a; // does not work, since there's no default constructor
}

Let's say that our default constructor does not do anything special and is (more or less) equal to the compiler generated one. We can fix it by either writing our own default constructor (which can get tedious if our class has many non-static members), or by using the = default syntax:

struct A
{
  A() = default;
  A(const A& arg) : data(arg.data)
  {
    do_something_special();
  }

  int data;
};

Deleting functions is useful when we want to forbid using specific overloads or template specializations, or just for forbidding copying (or moving) objects.

void foo(char c) {}
void foo(int i) = delete; // do not allow implicit int -> char conversion

When you want to forbid copying (i.e. thread objects), the usual idiomatic way is to declare private copy constructor without implementation (yeah, or use boost::noncopyable). While this works for most cases, you can get into some obscure linker errors sometimes. Consider:

struct A
{
  A() = default;

  friend void foo();

private:
  A(const A&);
};

void foo()
{
  A a;
  A b(a); // results in linker error in gcc
}

Making A(const A&) deleted, we avoid potential linker errors and make our intent (disallow copying) very clear.

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A user-declared special member function is not trivial. If a class has any nontrivial special member functions, the class is not POD. Therefore, this type is POD:

struct S {
    S() = default;
    S(int) { }
};

but this type is not POD:

struct S {
    S() { }
    S(int) { }
};
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@Christian: If we simply had struct S { S(int) { } };, the presence of S(int) would suppress the implicitly declared default constructor. –  James McNellis Aug 29 '11 at 20:44
    
The rules for POD have been relaxed in C++0x/11 so your second example would also be a POD in C++0x/11. You can also use the new traits<T>::is_pod to check yourself with a static assert for example. –  David Aug 30 '11 at 11:48
    
@David: The rules for POD have indeed been relaxed, but the second S is still not POD. A POD struct must be a trivial class. A trivial class must have a trivial default constructor. A user-provided default constructor is not trivial. The second S has a user-provided default constructor and is therefore not POD. –  James McNellis Aug 30 '11 at 15:27
    
@James: I thought for sure you were wrong. It looks like you're right. But, if you add a constexpr to the second example it becomes a POD class again. –  deft_code Aug 30 '11 at 16:28
    
James please read this - www2.research.att.com/~bs/C++0xFAQ.html#PODs - from what I see there your second example is a POD. Constructors are irrelevant to PODs in C++0x/11. –  David Aug 30 '11 at 19:32

You would use the deleted functions for classes where you want to prevent copying or direct instantiation for example (a la singleton where you want to do a get_instance() function instead). You cold also use delete to prevent certain variations of your constructor.

The default is useful if you want the compiler generated constructor for any of the ones implicitly generated. For example if you create a custom argument constructor, the default no argument one would not be generated by the compiler so you could ask that it be generated for you with the default keyword.

See here for examples of the above

http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/C++0xFAQ.html#default

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