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I have to do an exercise and I´m pretty lost... I need to do an instance for Ord with polynomials. This is my try:

data Pol = P [(Float,Int)] deriving Show

instance Ord Pol where
  (Pol a) > (Pol b)  = (maxGrado a) > (maxGrado b) || ((maxGrado a) == (maxGrado b) && (maxCoe a) > (maxCoe b))
  (Pol a) < (Pol b)  = (maxGrado a) < (maxGrado b) || ((maxGrado a) == (maxGrado b) && (maxCoe a) < (maxCoe b))

maxGrado :: [(Float,Int)] -> Int
maxGrado [] = 0
maxGrado ((c,g):xs) = g  

maxCoe :: [(Float,Int)] -> Int
maxCoe [] = 0
maxcoe ((c,g):xs) = c

--error:

ERROR file:.\Febrero 2011.hs:32 - Undefined data constructor "Pol"

The error is very dumb but it´s been an hour trying to solve it... Could anyone help me?.

Thank you!!

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1  
Please don't downvote - this question is absolutely legit. –  FUZxxl Aug 29 '11 at 18:54
    
in the original form the question was not answerable without knowing the older posts which got me a downvote too - but I removed it allready –  Carsten König Aug 29 '11 at 18:59
1  
Since you said you "have to do an exercise" I added the "homework" tag. –  Michael Kohl Aug 29 '11 at 22:41

2 Answers 2

data Pol = P [(Int, Int)]

In this declaration, Pol is the type constructor, and P is the only data constructor for this data type. In general, a data type can have multiple data constructors so that's why we have this distinction.

A simple rule is that you should use the type constructor whenever you're talking about types, and the data constructor whenever you're talking about values.

In this case, you should use Pol in the instance head, but P in the patterns for your functions.

instance Ord Pol where
  (P a) > (P b)  = ...
  (P a) < (P b)  = ...

Also note that type constructors and data constructors live in different namespaces, and are never used in the same context. This means that it's ok for them to have the same name.

data Pol = Pol [(Int, Int)]

This would also work.

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Yes, you´re right but now it´s giving me this error: ERROR file:.\Febrero 2011.hs:30 - Cannot build superclass instance *** Instance : Ord Pol *** Context supplied : () *** Required superclass : Eq Pol –  Sierra Aug 29 '11 at 18:56
    
@user918139: Eq is a superclass for Ord, so that means that you must also have an Eq instance. The easiest thing to do in this case is to tell the compiler to derive it for you, just like you've done with Show: data ... deriving (Eq, Show). –  hammar Aug 29 '11 at 18:58
    
Great!!, it works. Thank you so much!! –  Sierra Aug 29 '11 at 19:05

I think you want to use P instead of Pol in your instance functions. Pol is the type, P is the constructor.

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Yes, you´re right but now it´s giving me this error: ERROR file:.\Febrero 2011.hs:30 - Cannot build superclass instance *** Instance : Ord Pol *** Context supplied : () *** Required superclass : Eq Pol –  Sierra Aug 29 '11 at 18:58

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