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If I have The code:

function RandomObjectThatIsntNamedObjectWhichIOriginallyNamedObjectOnAccident() {
    this.foo = 0;
    this.bar = function () {
        this.naba = function () {
            //How do I reference foo here?
        }
    }
}
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5  
On a side note, Object is a terrible function name. You can override javascript's Object –  Joe Aug 29 '11 at 19:50
1  
It depends on what you are going to do with naba. How are you calling it? What are you doing with Object? What this refers to eventually depends on how you are calling the functions. As long as we don't know this, we can only guess what would be the best solution. –  Felix Kling Aug 29 '11 at 20:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You need a self reference:

function RandomObjectThatIsntNamedObjectWhichIOriginallyNamedObjectOnAccident() {
    var self = this;
    this.foo = 0;
    this.bar = function () {
        this.naba = function () {
            self.foo; //foo!
        }
    }
}
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I thought about using that, but was concerned that it might actually create a copy of the object instead of just creating a reference. Thanks a lot everyone! –  Conner Ruhl Aug 29 '11 at 19:51
1  
Of course, you could never create an "Object" since it overrides Object –  Joe Aug 29 '11 at 19:52
    
@ConnerRuhl -- no problem ^_^ –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 19:52
    
@IAbstractDownvoteFactory -- I know that, i was just going off the OP's post. did not really think abt the object's name. –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 19:52

Interestingly enough, you don't need to do anything special.

The this reference works:

function SomeObject() {
  this.foo = 0;
  this.bar = function () {
    this.naba = function () {
      alert(this.foo); // this works!
    }
  }
}

Since you're assigning "methods" always to the same reference, this will still point to it inside bar, and later inside naba.

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That is when you Object is a function and NOT an object. try it with new. then it does not work. –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:07
    
I think this is what you meant to show: jsfiddle.net/t2Qha/1 (which suprisingly works) –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:08
    
@Neal: When you call var obj = new Object(); obj.bar(); obj.naba(); then it will work, because this always references obj. –  Felix Kling Aug 29 '11 at 20:08
    
@Felix : jsfiddle.net/t2Qha/1 i just said that. –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:09
    
@Neal: Come on, there have been like 25 seconds between our comments. Do you inspect me to refresh the page every 10 seconds? ;) –  Felix Kling Aug 29 '11 at 20:13

Try the following

function SomeObject() {
    var self = this;
    this.foo = 0;
    this.bar = function () {
        this.naba = function () {
            //How do I reference foo here?
            self.foo
        }
    }
}
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You should really use var self, because this.self will make self publicly accessible. –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 29 '11 at 19:49
1  
@Rocket, well, no, it will just have the same issue as before... where you cannot access it, i do not see how this works. –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 19:51
    
@Rocket, doh, stupid miss. Fixed. –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 19:52
    
@JaredPar -- good fix, and it makes me all warm and fuzzy inside that users with >150K rep can still make mistakes :-P –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 19:54
1  
@Neal I make tons of mistakes, especially if I post before I finish the morning coffee :) –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 19:55
function SomeObject() {
    var self = this;
    this.foo = 0;
    this.bar = function () {
        this.naba = function () {
            self.foo;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for getting in 2 seconds after me ^_^ –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 19:47
    
I blame the captchas, I would have been 20 seconds earlier ;) –  Halcyon Aug 29 '11 at 19:47
    
ha. sorry about that :-P –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 19:48

First: Don't name your function Object, it will shadow the global Object constructor.

I don't see a reason why you have to assign naba inside bar to the instance. Why are you doing this? You can assign both bar and naba to the functions prototype:

function MyConstructor() {
    this.foo = 0;
}

MyConstructor.prototype.bar = function () {

};

MyConstructor.prototype.naba = function () {
    // this.foo
};

Eventually it depends on how you are calling the naba function. The fact that you are assigning it to this suggests you want to call it with

var obj = new MyConstructor();
obj.naba();

If you want to add naba only after bar was called, you can still access foo via this.foo:

MyConstructor.prototype.bar = function () {
    if(!this.naba) {
        this.naba = function() {
            // this.foo
        };
    }
};

var obj = new MyConstructor();
obj.bar();
obj.naba();

If you want a proper/better answer, you have to show how you are going to use naba.

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What you're suggesting is not equivalent. naba gets assigned to bar, not the object. I general I would suggest you don't use this or prototype at all because it's very error prone. Most people seem to completely misunderstand how JavaScript works (and that it works without prototype). If you'd like I could post an equivalent solution that doesn't use this or prototype. –  Halcyon Aug 29 '11 at 20:01
1  
@Frits: I think I understand how it works. naba never gets assigned to bar, it gets assigned to whatever this refers to. Most likely it is an instance of the constructor function, but it could as well be window. But this is never bar. And if you have a constructor function, then using a prototype is the preferred way to attach instance methods (saves memory). And I don't see what is error prone with this or prototype. It might be difficult to understand at first, but there is nothing overall mystical about it. –  Felix Kling Aug 29 '11 at 20:03
    
It seems you are correct, and it's exactly what I mean, this is confusing. Here's an example: jsfiddle.net/JZ7c2 –  Halcyon Aug 29 '11 at 20:08
2  
@Fritz: What this refers to depends on how the function is called. There are four different ways, see my answer here. Which means that in order to give a proper answer, we would have to know how the OP is calling all these functions. –  Felix Kling Aug 29 '11 at 20:11

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