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I'm just breaking into the ruby world and I could use a helping hand.

Suppose b is nil.

I'd like the following code to return nil instead of a "NoMethodError: undefined method"

a.b.c("d").e

The first thing I tried was to overload NilClass's missing_method to simply return a nil. This is the behaviour I want except I don't want to be this intrusive.

I'd love it if I could do something like this

SafeNils.a.b.c("d").e

So it's like a clean way to locally overload the NilClass's behaviour.

I'd love to hear some ideas or great resources for digging in on this. I'm also quite open to other approaches as long as it's fairly clean.

Thank you very much.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you can find a great solution in rails but that solution follows a different approach. Take a look at the try method. It's a clean approach.

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2  
You can find the code at github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/activesupport/lib/… –  Holger Just Aug 29 '11 at 20:15
1  
Thank you.. that'll work nicely :-) –  David Wright Aug 30 '11 at 3:57
    
Since the wording is somewhat ambiguous: Note that try is not a native Ruby solution, but a Rails-specific one; @HolgerJust's comment points to the relevant portion of Rails source code. Using try, the OP's code would have to be written as: a.b.try(:c, "d").try(:e). Compare that to @SonySantos' inline-rescue solution: stackoverflow.com/a/11544110/45375 –  mklement0 Aug 7 at 3:03

"try" is very clean, as lucapette said. More generally, you could also use a begin-rescue-end block too, depending on your situation.

begin
  a.b.c("d").e
rescue NoMethodError=>e
  return nil
end
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Check Ick's maybe:

a.b.maybe.c("d").maybe.e

or using a block:

a.b.maybe { |b| b.c("d").e }
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As of the time of this comment, the above link is dead; Looks like ick can it still be found at github.com/raganwald-deprecated/ick, but the word 'deprecated' doesn't bode well. –  mklement0 Aug 7 at 2:48

Remark in advance: b is a method, not a variable. So b 'is' not nil, it returns nil.

When 'b' is a method, why not modify b, so it returns something, what can handle nil.

See below for an example.


You may define the missing methods:

class A
  def b
    nil
  end
end
class NilClass
  def c(p);nil;end
  def e;nil;end
end
a = A.new

a.b.c("d").e

But I think, a rescue may fit your need better:

class A
  def b
    nil
  end
end
a = A.new
x = begin a.c.c("d").e 
rescue NoMethodError
  nil
end

An example, how you may define a nil-like example.

class A
  def b
    MyNil.new
  end
end

class MyNil
  def method_missing(m, *args, &block)
      if nil.respond_to?(m)
        nil.send(m)
    else
      self
    end
  end
  #Simulate nils bahaviour.
  def nil?;true;end
  def inspect;nil.inspect;end
  def to_s;nil;end
end

a = A.new
x = a.b.c("d").e 
p x
puts x
p x.nil?
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You can use the inline rescue:

x = a.b.c("d").e rescue nil

x will be nil if b is nil.

Or, as someone commented in that link, you can use the andand gem (see docs):

x = a.andand.b.andand.c("d").andand.e
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To use a safe_nils similar to that you wrote:

def safe_nils &blk
  return blk.call
rescue NoMethodError
  return nil
end

safe_nils { a.b.c("d").e }
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