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I'll have more than one of these small boxes on my site, and each will start counting down at different times.

How can I decrease the numerical value of the timer per second, giving the simulation of a countdown timer?

enter image description here

<p class="countdown">15</p>

Using this javascript it correctly countsdown, but every single auctionbox is affected. How would you suggest I isolate the timer to act on only one item?

<script>
var sec = 15
var timer = setInterval(function() {
   $('.auctiondiv .countdown').text(sec--);
   if (sec == -1) {
      $('.auctiondiv .countdown').fadeOut('slow');
      clearInterval(timer);
   }
}, 1000);
</script>

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
The reason it affects all of them is because you're working on the CLASS, not the ID. Create a unique ID for your element. –  Sosukodo Aug 29 '11 at 21:11
    
@Sosukodo: Aha! That was it. :) Now the other question would be what ID to assign to each "auctionbox". Would I generate one according to their product name? How would you a veteran webdev, assign an ID to this? What algorithm would you use? –  Only Bolivian Here Aug 29 '11 at 21:16
    
Btw maybe you would like to take a look at this wonderful countdown plugin; keith-wood.name/countdown.html –  Burak Erdem Aug 29 '11 at 21:42
    
I have no idea what your backend looks like or what language you're using to drive it so I have no idea :-) It can be anything you like! –  Sosukodo Aug 29 '11 at 22:44
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try the following which will properly issue the count down for the selected values.

$(document).ready(function() {

  // Function to update counters on all elements with class counter
  var doUpdate = function() {
    $('.countdown').each(function() {
      var count = parseInt($(this).html());
      if (count !== 0) {
        $(this).html(count - 1);
      }
    });
  };

  // Schedule the update to happen once every second
  setInterval(doUpdate, 1000);
});

JSFiddle Example

Note: This will run the count down sequence on every element which has the countdown class. If you'd like to make it more restrictive to a single element you'll need to alter the selector from .countdown to something more restrictive. The easiest way is to add an id and reference the item directly.

<p id='theTarget'>15</p>

The JavaScript is a little more complex here because you'll want the timer to eventually shut off since there's not much chance, or use, of element with a duplicate id being added

$(document).ready(function() {

  var timer = setInterval(function() {

    var count = parseInt($('#theTarget').html());
    if (count !== 0) {
      $('#theTarget').html(count - 1);
    } else {
      clearInterval(timer);
    }
  }, 1000);
});

JSFiddle Example

share|improve this answer
    
@Malvolio, long day. Fixed –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 20:57
3  
@Malvolio: You're a rude person. –  Only Bolivian Here Aug 29 '11 at 20:57
    
I'm just sleepy. It's four in the morning where I am. @JaradPar -- as the risk of further annoying Sr. Tapia, it's still wrong. The display is no longer updated (a huge improvement), but the timer continues to run ad infinitum. –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 21:04
1  
@Malvolio my answer is written assuming that other DOM elements with the class countdown can be added at any time. The counter running forever is by design to handle this case –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 21:06
    
@JaredPar -- that's either a good explanation or a clever backfill. If you can tell me that was your intent, I'll upvote. –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 21:15
show 2 more comments

HTML:

<p id="countdown">15</p>

JS:

var count = document.getElementById('countdown');
timeoutfn = function(){
       count.innerHTML = parseInt(count.innerHTML) - 1;
       setTimeout(timeoutfn, 1000);
};
setTimeout(timeoutfn, 1000);

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/wwvEn/

share|improve this answer
    
as written, that goes from 15 to 14 and then stops. –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 20:52
    
Good answer. However, what happens once the value is below zero? (wink). Also, should be setInterval() not setTimeout –  Kris Krause Aug 29 '11 at 20:52
    
crap one sec... –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:54
    
@Kris i fixed it –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:55
    
@Malvolio -- i fixed it, it should work now :-) –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:56
show 2 more comments

You don't need jQuery for this (though it will help in setting the text).

setInterval is what you want.

$.each(
    $('.countdown'), function(el) { 
         setInterval( function() { 
             $(this).text($(this).text()*1 - 1);
         }, 1000); 
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
this never stops. It goes to zero, then -1, then -2... –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 20:55
    
@Mavolio -- when did the OP say they wanted it to stop counting down? –  Neal Aug 29 '11 at 20:56
2  
Wow, why the hate? It was my understanding that SO is not code machine but a helper - and that is what I did. I gave the OP a basis to work off of. And as @Neal said, it was never technically specified that it should stop. –  josh.trow Aug 29 '11 at 21:03
    
@Neal -- that's kind of the point of a countdown. Fritz Lang, who invented the countdown for his 1929 film Woman In The Moon, explained that if you counted up, the audience wouldn't know when the rocket would launch; with a count down, everybody knows when you get to zero, boom. –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 21:09
    
@Malvolio: While I understand that you feel it should stop at zero (and I do agree), I don't feel that writing full, complete, and error-proof code for anyone who asks for it is correct. Also, I suspect people used countdowns a bit before 1929 :) –  josh.trow Aug 29 '11 at 21:14
show 2 more comments
var countDown = function() {
    var ct = 15;
    var $elem = $(this);
    var display = function() {
       $elem.text(ct--);
    }
    var iv = setInterval(function() {
        display();
        if (ct === 0) {
          clearInterval(iv);
        }
    }, 1000);
    display();
};
$("#countdown").each(countDown);
share|improve this answer
1  
Why are you using each to iterate over an id selector (should only return 1 element)? Seems odd especially since the OP specified a style in the question? Also you're re-populating the HTML element with 15 instead of using the value put into the HTML. –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 21:08
    
Good questions, to which I have only lame answers. As I was originally writing it, I looked at Neal's answer, which had the ID. It wasn't (and isn't) clear to me what the OP needs. A countdown from 15? A countdown from the current value whatever it is? –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 21:14
    
The OP is ambiguous on a couple of these elements. They both explicitly set the HTML element to 15 and then reset it to 15 their self (a bit odd). Mainly I was distracted by the each on the id selector. I don't believe that has any functional value but not good enough with js to say for sure (experiments say no). Note: I'm not the downvoter. –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 21:25
    
About each: you have to do something. All jQuery elements consist of "some number" of DOM elements. Even if you as the programmer knows that that "some number" is 1, the code doesn't. $.each is as good a way as any to get to it. "Functional value" is exactly what it does have, in the "functional programming" sense of "functional". –  Malvolio Aug 29 '11 at 21:29
    
By functional I meant did it have a functional difference between using each and just calling the method on $('#countdown') directly. I don't believe this will ever produce a diff but can certainly be convinced –  JaredPar Aug 29 '11 at 21:30
show 2 more comments

Try this in your inspector to get the idea how a countdown timer should work:

var count = 15; setInterval("if(count>0)console.log(count--)", 1000)

And here is full code for your case(no jquery)

var counter = document.getElementsByClassName('countdown')[0],
    count = parseInt(counter);
setInterval("if(count>0)counter.innerHTML(count--)", 1000)
share|improve this answer
    
Now, I know this may work, but why do it? You are forcing the machine to use eval when you could just send it a clean, anonymous function ready to execute. –  josh.trow Aug 29 '11 at 21:16
    
You're right... –  Mohsen Aug 29 '11 at 21:17
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